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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Curious Enquiry into Christianity and Paganism
"Pagan and Christian Creeds: Their Origin and Meaning" provides a holistic view on the religious and political environment that shaped christianity into what we know it as today. Carpenter draws upon the Mithras-mythos among others to show how the magic and miracles of Jesus was enducted also by other God-creatures and wonder-men before, during and after his time.
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Published on 9 Dec 2003 by Caroline Hoel

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting at first, a bit repetitive later on
The first 3-4 chapters of this book are, in my opinion, absolutely necessary if you want to understand how Christianity was formed on its first couple of centuries, what it took from the other (more popular, back then) religions spread in the Roman empire, and what all of these myths have in common. It also provides very good explanations on why these myths needed to...
Published 22 months ago by Drifter


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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Curious Enquiry into Christianity and Paganism, 9 Dec 2003
"Pagan and Christian Creeds: Their Origin and Meaning" provides a holistic view on the religious and political environment that shaped christianity into what we know it as today. Carpenter draws upon the Mithras-mythos among others to show how the magic and miracles of Jesus was enducted also by other God-creatures and wonder-men before, during and after his time.
A topic a little off the main track, "Pagan and Christian Creeds" makes a curious reading for both Christians who are not afraid to understand how their religion struggled to survive, pagans who lack a comparative source for investigation and simply anoyone interested in the religious currents in Europe the past 2500 years.
Anyone who ever claimed to be christian should read this book, as well as people who harass the church for its history.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Stimulating read, 16 Aug 2014
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This book is thought provoking and entices you to challenge your conceptions of the world and your experiences of it. This text is probably more relevant today then when it was written
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting at first, a bit repetitive later on, 1 Dec 2012
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The first 3-4 chapters of this book are, in my opinion, absolutely necessary if you want to understand how Christianity was formed on its first couple of centuries, what it took from the other (more popular, back then) religions spread in the Roman empire, and what all of these myths have in common. It also provides very good explanations on why these myths needed to share these dogmas and rituals.

However, as we go further in the reading, the book becomes a bit repetitive, and therefore less interesting.

I didn't like, either, the author's theory about the three stages in religion's evolution, or his "explanation" about why there's a common myth about an initial garden of Eden on so many religions, making up an initial human state of perfect balance with nature (I think a psychological explanation based on a first infant stage in life would make much more sense). And therefore I didn't share his conclusion towards a future new balance period that includes a "world religion". It looks like all of that is just an exercise of imagination from the author, and it doesn't have any grounds in the real world.

As expected, the Kindle edition is not good (at some point one just has to forget about trying to follow the footnotes), but being a free book this is not surprising.

My general thought is that, since it's free, it's worth downloading just because of the first part of the book. It gives a lot of very interesting information about the origins of Christianity.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic. Unbelievable that it was written almost a century ago., 5 Jan 2014
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I read this book as someone with a growing interest paganism and as a person seeking unity in old beliefs that connect to nature and to the turning of the seasons. The book was very inspirational in the sense that it really does tear apart Christianity and other religions and clearly demonstrates them as quite pathetic incarnations of human-beings inability to look inward and appreciate our place in evolution and within nature.

The language and intensity make the book at times difficult to read but I completely admired the author and to a time when intellect was fashionable writing.

What is.most incredible is that this was written in 1918 yet I found it incredibly pertinent to my time on the planet and my sense of being lost within a mad consumerist society.

I lost my way often when reading but I got a great deal of satisfaction and meditation from it too. I am happy that I read it and feel it has helped me redefine and strengthen my own path.

I would have given it five for the fact that as someone who is not a big reader it was intense and hard work but it is definitely a five for thought provoking.

As it is a free book at the moment you should get it and read chapter ten and the first appendix on free time. I'm sure you would enjoy it and perhaps be encouraged to read more.

Way back in 1918 and writing like this! Amazing! He must have been utterly despised by the church then for writing the home truths and about the falsifications. Well it's what they deserved then and still is today.
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Pagan and Christian Creeds
Pagan and Christian Creeds by Edward Carpenter (Paperback - 1 Jun 2001)
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