Customer Reviews


18 Reviews
5 star:
 (13)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent
Immensely readable, this book presents a very interesting discussion of the "art" of coaching from numerous different angles. Downey stresses that coaching is an "art" and explores the principles of, and issues in, business coaching from a variety of viewpoints. This makes the book a great introduction for the beginner, but also a brilliant refresher for experienced...
Published on 10 Aug 2005

versus
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Showing its age
Effective coaching by Myles Downey could be argued to have stood the test of time, it has been one of the most popular introductory books on coaching since its publication. For many years I've put off reading it, until recently. While its a reasonable introduction to the subject of coaching, it is also symptomatic of so many books on coaching that were published during...
Published on 14 Dec 2008 by PZE


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

35 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 10 Aug 2005
By A Customer
This review is from: Effective Coaching: Lessons from the Coach's Coach: Lessons from the Coaches' Coach (Paperback)
Immensely readable, this book presents a very interesting discussion of the "art" of coaching from numerous different angles. Downey stresses that coaching is an "art" and explores the principles of, and issues in, business coaching from a variety of viewpoints. This makes the book a great introduction for the beginner, but also a brilliant refresher for experienced coaches to dip into and reinvigorate ideas and principles. Be warned though, this is not a coaching manual. There is no attempt to theorise, no coverage of psychological aspects and little structured coverage of tools and techniques (though there are some inspiring ideas). If you want tools and techniques there are a number of books available (I like "Performance Coaching" by Angus McLeod). However, to establish first principles and set the scene for coaching in a very inspiring and readable manner I highly recommend this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


43 of 44 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent analysis of coaching and its ethos, 10 May 2005
By 
Budge Burgess (Troon, Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Effective Coaching: Lessons from the Coach's Coach: Lessons from the Coaches' Coach (Paperback)
An intelligent and thought-provoking exploration of the role of the coach, specifically the business coach, and an excellent read for anyone working in the newly emerging coaching profession. Introduced by Tim Gallwey (whose "Inner Game" precipitated a sea-change in sports coaching and helped trigger the emergence of life and business coaching - Downey's book makes regular reference to Gallwey.
Downey begins by pointing out that coaching is largely unregulated, has no core professional status or training/qualification requirements, and is, effectively, validated only by the person receiving the coaching. Coaching is results driven - it is predicated on empowering the client (or 'player'). The role of the coach is to encourage you to believe in yourself, to understand the complexities that are self, to help you discover the skills and momentum you need to transform self-belief into action, and then to motivate you towards achievement.
Downey writes of the need to bring humanity back to the workplace - and his book is largely directed at those working in business coaching. It's a very humanistic, compassionate approach - the role of the coach is not to mould automatons who will go to work unquestioningly, but to help people find their creative side, explore their imagination, recognise their intelligence, skills, passions, etc. The workplace benefits because the workers are fulfilled and achieve a balanced lifestyle which brings a fresh vitality to their work.
Gallwey's "Inner Game" identified the problem - what comes between you performing at your best and achieving your potential is that inner echo of doubt, that indecision refrain which repeats and repeats in your inner ear, "I can't", "I'll fail", "I'll miss", "they'll laugh at me", "what if ...", "what if ...", "what if ... ?" You have your own inner chorus of doubt and negative commentary. Gallwey argues that you have to switch this off and achieve "relaxed concentration" - often now described as "flow".
Downey sees the relevance of this to business coaching - if you are already plagued by this inner chorus of doubt and negativity, the sort of thing which prevents the player hitting the ball true, or taking the catch, or whatever, how much more battered must you feel if that chorus is orchestrated and conducted by a manager or work colleagues who routinely put you down? Downey's is a humanistic approach to coaching which emphasises listening, communication, creating a safe world where coach and client can achieve their own "flow" of understanding. Downey's vision of coaching is one of liberation and self-growth, is an exercise in the intimate trust and inspiration of rapport.
For Downey, effective coaching delivers fulfilment and achievement ... achievement which is sustainable. It doesn't just equip the individual to do the job better, it equips them with a confidence and self-assertiveness which they can transfer to their everyday life.
Coaching is an art - the art of interaction, of working together in harmony. Downey explores the practicalities - listening skills, the GROW model, the intricacies of business coaching - but it is his emphasis on creativity which I find most impressive and most stimulating. Creativity is at the core of the human condition - too many people learn not to be creative because it's safer to be the same. Too many learn to doubt their creative ability or potential. Too many learn to keep secret skills of innovation, problem solving, or imagination. It's safer to conform, it's safer not to take risks, it's best not to give others an excuse to laugh or condemn.
Downey emphasises the need to empower the individual, to extend to the client the liberation of being allowed to think, to imagine, to adventure, to take control.
It's a well-written book - it doesn't tell you how to go about becoming a coach, it doesn't provide you with a how-to guide to 'doing' coaching, but if you work in coaching, or psychology, counselling, social work, even medicine or teaching, it gives an invaluable perspective which will enable you to reassess your skills (and attitudes), and give greater depth to your practice. An excellent book, highly accessible, and deserving of a wide audience.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


67 of 71 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Intro, 10 April 2002
By A Customer
Having trailed along on the business sidelines for a number of years, coaching is suddenly enjoying a major surge of popularity. But what's it all about? Tennis in the Boardroom? Golf swings by the water cooler?
Myles Downey's book, despite its relative brevity, makes an excellent job of introducing some of the key considerations involved in training or hiring business coaches. At 135 pages (including the Introduction) you obviously aren't going to get an in-depth explanation of what coaching can do for you and/or your company. What I think you WILL get is a pretty good feeling for whether coaching can be of benefit to you.
If that makes the book sound a bit airy-fairy, I apologise. Mr Downey also does an excellent job of laying the groundwork for becoming an "effective coach" - if that's what you're after. There's actually plenty of very practical tips, including useful models, such as the "Spectrum of Coaching Skills" and the GROW (or TO GROW) outline of any coaching session.
One of the highlights of the book as far, as I was concerned, was the inclusion of snippets of dialogue (ranging from a few lines to several pages in length) used to actually demonstrate how to handle various elements of the coaching function.
The one element of the book I felt a little uneasy about was Mr Downey's hypothesis that a manager can also function as coach to one of his/her subordinates. As Mr Downey himself points out, facts and thoughts might emerge during a coaching session that could potentially be somewhat damaging when it comes to appraisal time. There seems to be an assumption that a "good" manager could somehow separate the two functions and ignore in 'manager mode' the things s/he has learnt whilst in 'coaching mode'.
I'd suggest that this is a piece of impractical idealism, which places an unrealistic and unfair burden upon the manager.
Rather than sweeping such considerations under the rug, it seems to me that coaching is likely to remain a fad until issues such as this have been fully addressed and resolved.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Showing its age, 14 Dec 2008
By 
This review is from: Effective Coaching: Lessons from the Coach's Coach: Lessons from the Coaches' Coach (Paperback)
Effective coaching by Myles Downey could be argued to have stood the test of time, it has been one of the most popular introductory books on coaching since its publication. For many years I've put off reading it, until recently. While its a reasonable introduction to the subject of coaching, it is also symptomatic of so many books on coaching that were published during the initial growth of this industry, based around the lessons from one person.

However, the last few years has seen a whole new cohort of authors with much more research rigour publishing in this field. Examples include Erik de Haan who has written widely on this subject, alternatively look at Fitzgerald and Berger's work on Executive Coaching. For those now looking for something beyond a basic introduction, Mary Beth O'Neill's work "Executive Coaching with Backbone and Heart" is worth reading to learn how coaching can be applied in an organisational context. If you are looking for something which is an introduction to psychology and coaching, then Bruce Peltier's The Psychology of Executive Coaching is still probably the most readable on this area.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Coaching how it should be, 25 Aug 2009
By 
Mr. J. N. Cobb (Oldham) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Effective Coaching: Lessons from the Coach's Coach: Lessons from the Coaches' Coach (Paperback)
An absolutely excellent summary of all forms of Coaching.

Whether you are a manager or a professional coach this book will bring method and clarity to your coaching of others. It covers individual and lightly team methods too. Obviously this man has taught and coached for some time. Highly recommmended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Expectations partly met, 16 Sep 2010
This review is from: Effective Coaching: Lessons from the Coach's Coach: Lessons from the Coaches' Coach (Paperback)
I have expected a bit more structure and especially more practice, good as intro for the newcomers to the coaching but not if you would like to get greater insight.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful book, 22 Dec 2003
This review is from: Effective Coaching: Lessons from the Coach's Coach: Lessons from the Coaches' Coach (Paperback)
Effective Coaching is one of the few books that genuinely captures both the power and simplicity of non-directive coaching. It is a wonderful place for anyone wanting to learn to coach effectively as well as a return to basics for those coaches who may have gotten mired in complexity.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A must have!, 11 Sep 2013
This review is from: Effective Coaching: Lessons from the Coach's Coach: Lessons from the Coaches' Coach (Paperback)
This is a very intersting book, especially for those who are new in the coaching business. I have put a foot into the coaching business not long ago and it has made me realize, that you can only gain real experience, by acutally coaching. The live coaching community [...] is therefore a wonderful opportunity for me, to gain even more experience in coaching apart from my day to day clients. The art of coaching is still very complex for me but this book in combination with your24hcoach helps me to actually discover it step by step.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The best approach!, 16 Aug 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Effective Coaching: Lessons from the Coach's Coach: Lessons from the Coaches' Coach (Paperback)
A very simple and effective book that should be compulsory reading for all coaches and would also benefit those in the health and education professions too.
Well, written, yet with enough depth to give full understanding of what is going on and why.
Myles Downey's coaching approach puts the person seeking coaching where they should be, firmly in the centre of the whole process,
The process recognises that all the learning and development takes place inside he head of the player. The role of the coach and how best for them to add value to the process are clearly explained.
The process is not complicated, the value of the coach is fully recognised and both the player and the business get exactly what they need to achieve their goals in life.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Very practical and well explained book., 12 May 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Effective Coaching: Lessons from the Coach's Coach: Lessons from the Coaches' Coach (Paperback)
Because from coaching point of view , I think that Myles is very practical and very Bussiness Coaching oriented, I think is a great book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Effective Coaching: Lessons from the Coach's Coach: Lessons from the Coaches' Coach
Used & New from: £32.03
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews