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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding presentation of the dharma
We are always alive. We do not die. We can only anticipate death (or not, as we see fit).

We can never die because the "we" that is real and conscious is never alive in the sense that our bodies are alive. Our bodies live and die, but we do not.

There never was a time we were not, and there never will be a time when we are not.

This...
Published on 28 Nov 2006 by Dennis Littrell

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars lots of messages are missing
I have read three version english translations of The Dhammapada, this translation although is easy to read, but many messages have been missing.

To be honest, for any serious readers, do try to read the versions of by Max Müller and Max Fausböll, [1881], or/and The Buddha's Way of Virtue, by W.D.C Wagiswara and K.J. Saunders, [1920]

In...
Published 10 months ago by Kate


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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding presentation of the dharma, 28 Nov 2006
By 
Dennis Littrell (SoCal/NorCal/Maui) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Dhammapada (Paperback)
We are always alive. We do not die. We can only anticipate death (or not, as we see fit).

We can never die because the "we" that is real and conscious is never alive in the sense that our bodies are alive. Our bodies live and die, but we do not.

There never was a time we were not, and there never will be a time when we are not.

This understanding comes from the Vedas and was known at the time of the Buddha's birth. But this is not something that somebody can tell you, and nobody told it to the Buddha. He realized this truth only after years of striving toward it. He saw what the problem was. He saw that the problem could be solved. He formulated a teaching so that others could understand, and then he went out into the world and for forty-some years taught others what he had discovered. The essence of what the Buddha learned is in the Dhammapada.

This translation by the eminent scholar Eknath Easwaran is elegant in its timeless simplicity. How like the original Pali it must be! Comparing this to the most venerable of the English translations, that of Max Muller from 1870, is like comparing poetry to prose, like comparing a holograph to a flat screen. This is not to denigrate Muller's translation, which is very good; it is only to emphasize the penetrating beauty and lucidity of Easwaran's work.

Additionally, Easwaran has written a 65-page Introduction in which he recalls the traditional life of the Buddha in some detail, although with perhaps a bit more flourish than most scholars would allow! He incorporates the Buddhist teachings and--like others such as David Darling and Fritjol Capra--finds a striking connection to modern physics which he explains very well. He also gives us his idea of the four stages of meditation, the first, second, third, and fourth dhyanas. He closes with a brief discussion of karma, death, birth and nirvana explained from what he sees as the Buddha's understanding.

Another excellent feature of this book are the chapter introductions by Stephen Ruppenthal. They are twenty little essays that illuminate what is to come. Ruppenthal compares the ideas of each chapter with those of other chapters as well as calling in ideas from other works. He even finds reasons to quote from the poets Robert Frost and John Keats. In this way the student is guided to a comprehensive understanding of the Dhammapada and an appreciation of its universal appeal. Ruppenthal's scholarship and deep understanding of Buddhism is obvious.

In short, this book is an outstanding introduction to Buddhism through its most beloved and practical work, the timeless Dhammapada.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A lifetime companion, 14 Jun 2006
By 
M. J. Buninga - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Dhammapada (Paperback)
It simply is my most used book. I started just reading it, beginning with the elaborate introduction written by Easwaran. It gives an extremely insightful picture of what sort of person Buddha was and how important and inspiring he was in his own days. The translation itself is more than just a modern and appealing translation. I think the spiritual wisdom of Easwaran gives this translation an extra value.

Every chapter has its own introduction, which enables the reader to understand the text a little better than he would without it.

I was so attracted and impressed by the by the superconcentrated wisdom of the dhammapada that I decided to learn the text by heart. A work, which is still in progress.

So there you got the reason why I use it so much.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Dhammapada, 18 Oct 2011
This review is from: The Dhammapada (Classics of Indian Spirituality) (Paperback)
A most inspiring book. Starting with the introduction of the Buddha's life,the spiritual unfolding of a great soul. The author is a wonderful storyteller and has made the Buddha come to life for me. The teachings of the Dharmapadda are so simple,but when applied diligently in our daily lives, a true path to peace and happiness within. Thank you Eknath Easwaran for giving me a great tool to transform my life!
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Dhammapada - Eknath Easwaran, 26 Nov 2010
By 
ShiDaDao Ph.D (London UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Dhammapada (Classics of Indian Spirituality) (Paperback)
The Dhammapada - 'The Path of Truth' - has been beautifully translated by Eknath Easwaran (1910-1999), an academic professor, and pioneer of 'Passage Meditation'. This translation is from the original Pali, but Eknath has kept certain key terms in phonetical Sanskrit, as he explains that in the West, due to the influence of Mahayana Buddhism in general, and Zen Buddhism inparticular, Sanskrit pronunciations are more commonly known. For instance, the Pali 'Nibbana' is rendered as the Sanskrit 'Nirvana', 'kamma' is rendered as 'kharma', and 'Dhamma' is rendered as 'Dharma', etc. Interestingly, Eknath does keep the Pali rendering of the title as 'Dhammapada', instead of the Sanskrit 'Dharmapada'. This Buddhist sutra is comprised of 26 chapters which collectively contain 426 aphorism, or short sayings of the Buddha. This sutra has been popular amongst Buddhist for many years. As a sutra, it covers a general over-view of the Buddha's path, and is unique in as much a its contained teaching appears to represent the three main philosophical traditions of worldwide Buddhism, namely the Theravada, Mahayana and Vajra/Tamtrayana. Rather than these schools being separate and distinct entities, Eknath's translation presents them - quite rightly - as distinct aspect of exactly the same Dhamma, or 'Teaching'. In effect, the Dhammpada is showing that an individual on the spiritual path will need access to all three notions as progression is made. In this respect, the Dhammapada serves to remind all that the apparently separate philosophical schools of Buddhism, have infact exactly the same spiritual basis - a point undoubtedly not lost on Eknath himself, as he always strove to present the 'holistic' nature of spiritual discourse.

The paperback (Penguin-Arkana) edition contains 208 numbered pages. Eknath supplies an ample Introduction to the main text that numbers 77 pages. This is a biography of the Buddha Himself, coupled with a braod historical narrative of the time. Enath, as well as explaining key Buddhist terms, also points out that the old East, and the old West formally met through the military expeditions of Alexander the Great (326BC) - such an event - Eknath states - invites comparison between these two civilisations. Ekath might have added the early travels of the Greek philosopher Pythagoras (c. 500BC), who is recorded as visiting India. Eknath, as very much a spiritual internationalist, mentions both the Hindu and Christian wisdom traditions, whilst building a general narrative. Within this narrative he includes the four stages of meditation - or four Dhyanas. Briefly stated, they are:

1) An initial 'quietening' of the Mind.
2) The workings of the Mind become apparent and thoughts are perceived as rising and passing away without end.
3) Gaps - or 'space' between thoughts are perceived. These gaps are in fact a doorway to the empty (sunyata) nature of the Mind.
4) Emptiness is fully realised, and through further study, the klesa, or troubles in the Mind are dissolved.

Eknath translates the first stanza thus:

'Our life is shaped by our mind; we become
what we think. Suffering follows an evil
thought as the wheels of a cart follow the oxen
thatdraw it.'

With each chapter, Eknath includes a contextual introduction that seeks to clarify specific points of interest. This is a very fine translation an presentation of ancient Asian wisdom. A perfect Dhammapada.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars lots of messages are missing, 18 Sep 2013
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This review is from: The Dhammapada (Classics of Indian Spirituality) (Paperback)
I have read three version english translations of The Dhammapada, this translation although is easy to read, but many messages have been missing.

To be honest, for any serious readers, do try to read the versions of by Max Müller and Max Fausböll, [1881], or/and The Buddha's Way of Virtue, by W.D.C Wagiswara and K.J. Saunders, [1920]

In addition, the author has put too much his own understandings into The Dhammpada....
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Dhammapada by Eknath Easwaran, 13 Jan 2013
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This review is from: The Dhammapada (Classics of Indian Spirituality) (Paperback)
Good summary of Buddhist teaching and philosophy. The introduction describing Siddhartha Gautama's world and how he came to become the Buddha was particularly lucid and dealt well with the background of how buddhism developed.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book for yoga teachers, 23 Jun 2011
By 
George A. Watts (Mid Wales, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Dhammapada (Classics of Indian Spirituality) (Paperback)
I'm a yoga teacher and am always looking for resources that can help improve my yoga classes. I purchased Eknath Easwaran's Gita book a few weeks back and loved it. The Dhammapada is another great book from Easwaran. Other great resources for yoga teachers include: Yoga Teacher Business Kit [CD] [DVD], Yoga Teacher Lesson Plan Kit [CD] [DVD], Quick Yoga Sites [DVD] and Yoga Studio Business Plan Kit on CD [DVD].
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5.0 out of 5 stars Love it!, 17 April 2014
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This review is from: The Dhammapada (Classics of Indian Spirituality) (Paperback)
I want to learn more of the ancient religions as in the Hindus etc. I find these books very informative and hopefully guide me to a better place.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic, 23 Mar 2014
By 
K. J. Stone - See all my reviews
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A beautiful work and a pleasure to read. As with most ebooks there are a few little errors in the transcribing but then doubtless Caxton got the same complaints in his early days. It is the content that matters and that is well worth the time. Kindle makes some otherwise difficult to get classics accessible.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Budhism, 2 Mar 2014
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This review is from: The Dhammapada (Classics of Indian Spirituality) (Paperback)
I like this book very much as my Interest is in learning as much as I can about other Faiths. I am very interested in Budhism.
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The Dhammapada (Classics of Indian Spirituality)
The Dhammapada (Classics of Indian Spirituality) by Eknath Easwaran (Paperback - 30 Sep 2007)
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