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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Open-minded, unbiased, enlightening, brilliant!
I believe that in years to come, this book will come to be regarded as a spiritual classic. Wayne Teasdale has a thorough knowledge of the spiritual traditions of the East and West, and also of the indiginous religions. He cleverly, without bias(Brother Teasdale is a Catholic Monk) brings together knowledge from these religions to do exactly what the title of his book...
Published on 1 Jan 2001

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars ... no stars or one star as this is 'I hate it' and certainly that is not what I would ...
I can't give the book no stars or one star as this is 'I hate it' and certainly that is not what I would wish to express. It is indeed informative and the author intelligent and very able in expressing his ideas. .. of a supposed universal spirituality, within which he recognises the conflict between theistic and non theistic 'spirituality' but believes that man will...
Published 2 months ago by John3v16


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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Open-minded, unbiased, enlightening, brilliant!, 1 Jan 2001
By A Customer
I believe that in years to come, this book will come to be regarded as a spiritual classic. Wayne Teasdale has a thorough knowledge of the spiritual traditions of the East and West, and also of the indiginous religions. He cleverly, without bias(Brother Teasdale is a Catholic Monk) brings together knowledge from these religions to do exactly what the title of his book says. He also gives us excellent guidance on the various spiritual processes that we may follow to discover the divine presence which lies both in the universe at large and in the depths of our hearts. This book is a must both for the religiously committed and for the casually interested observer.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars blessing, 21 July 2006
This review is from: The Mystic Heart: Discovering a Universal Spirituality in the World's Religions (Paperback)
This is without a doubt, the most well written, informative and inspiring texts i have ever read on mysticism. Its greatest strength lies in its beautiful sense of humanity, of love and of compassion. It takes the great traditions and presents them in a light which is so illuminating to the reader, it is impossible to not be swept away by their never changing truths. Please, please, please read this book, a work that was undoubtedly guided by grace, by a man who was (in past tense sadly, as Brother Wayne Teasdale is no longer with us) utterly human, yet transmitted the very divine with his words. Just utterly beautiful, it cannto be expressed enough
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading for the heart, mind . . and soul, 7 Jun 2009
By 
Keith Beasley (Bangor, Wales) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Mystic Heart: Discovering a Universal Spirituality in the World's Religions (Paperback)
This is undoubtedly a book of and for our time. In an extremely engaging, very readable and above all hopeful book, Brother Wayne Teasdale offers the basis for a `Universal Communal Spirituality' based on interspiritual and intermystic ideas and practices. Drawing significantly from his own mystical journey from traditional Roman Catholic to urban monk, Teasdale relates the ground-breaking work of Bede Griffiths and Thomas Keating (amongst others) as they helped bring together Christianity with, particularly, Hindu faith. With a foreword by the Dalai Lama and key reference from Sufi, Jain and a range of respected Christian authors, this is a book with breadth as well as depth.

Whilst emphasizing both the need for and possibility of finding common understanding between the world's faiths, Brother Teasdale also stresses that this in no way diminishes any of them. Each religion has its particular culture and focus which has, and continues to be of, huge benefit to many. By opening ourselves to the alternative perspectives of different faiths however, Teasdale argues that we enhance our appreciation and understanding of our own faith. I would have to agree that this has very much been my experience.

What enables us to transcend individual creeds and rituals however is not just an open mind, but a willingness to surrender into the mystical experience that lies at the heart of all religions. This book draws from the writings of mystics of all faiths, clearly illustrating how, in ineffable moments and numinous experience, whether obtained through communion with nature, total engagement with God through the arts, or in a religious practice, the words we use to describe our experiences cease to matter. Such experiences are essential to any path to the divine.

Furthermore we, as readers, are asked to accept that we are each of us a mystic. And, following a mystical path (whichever one we feel right for us) can and will enable us to transcend ego and thus find the divinity within. Each religion may have it's own words and practices to make this point (and Brother Teasdale includes many quotes from across all major religions to illustrate this) but the underlying process to unity is shared. By working together in interfaith, interspiritual, intermystic or other communities with this shared world view, so we can not just find our own God within, (or nirvana, enlightenment, or whatever our tradition may call it) but express it outwardly in an engaging and compassionate way of living.

Reading and contemplating on this book most definitely enabled profound shifts in my thinking. And it is this expansion of consciousness that all mystics seek and which Wayne Teasdale so powerfully yet humbly calls upon us all to commit to; for not just our personal fulfillment but for the benefit of our whole species and planet.
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2.0 out of 5 stars ... no stars or one star as this is 'I hate it' and certainly that is not what I would ..., 28 Jun 2014
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This review is from: The Mystic Heart: Discovering a Universal Spirituality in the World's Religions (Paperback)
I can't give the book no stars or one star as this is 'I hate it' and certainly that is not what I would wish to express. It is indeed informative and the author intelligent and very able in expressing his ideas. .. of a supposed universal spirituality, within which he recognises the conflict between theistic and non theistic 'spirituality' but believes that man will advance to a higher state to find the universal truth inherent in all spiritualities and hence interspirituality.The author and many from a contemplative/inner conscientiousness /inner light background (including Thich Nhat Hanh) fail to understand the God of biblical Christians and his offer of a much simpler way to find absolute truth ( a theme of the author)..... by His grace and entering into a personal relationship with us through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. A simple reading of the gospel of John would easily demonstrate the belief that Jesus had that He was the Way, the Truth and the Life and that no one comes to God except through Him. This is the essence of Christian belief as recorded in the bible rather than the philosophical ‘christian?’ murmurings and humanistic pseudo spirituality of those such as the author who regard the orthodox good news of life in Christ as exclusive and fundamentalist.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 4 Feb 2013
By 
Marsha Eger - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Mystic Heart: Discovering a Universal Spirituality in the World's Religions (Paperback)
This is one of those important books to pay attention to for anyone interested in spirituality and how we can come together in the world towards peace.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blessed interspiritual thought, 22 Nov 2010
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This review is from: The Mystic Heart: Discovering a Universal Spirituality in the World's Religions (Paperback)
Wayne Teasdale scans across many faith traditions extracting the mystical core of them all. Refreshing,well- researched and a tremendously powerful call to unity in a fragmented world.

There is no attempt to show any faith as the best to the exclusion of all others which I am afraid I often encounter. This book reflects on the opportunity for us to engage in 'interspirituality' i.e. a way of extending our arms and heart to embrace and understand other traditions. This doesn't mean we lose or lessen the strength and depth of our own. In fact by understanding the techniques and philosophy of other traditions we can only deepen and refresh our own. And if you think about it if God is in everything then the idea that any one tradition has it all is absurd. All mystical traditions whether Christian, Hindu, Buddhist, Sufi,the Kabbalah etc offer an openness and oneness to an all encompassing vision of the world.

The author, being a Catholic monk, of course makes many references to the Catholic faith and draws on the writings of that tradition quite extensively (St John of the Cross, Teresa of Avila, Thomas Merton, Thomas Keating to name a few) but he also writes knowledgeably about other traditions and shows how ultimately all spiritual practice is universally about inner development that reaches 'fruition in selfless love, compassion, mercy, and kindness'. True spiritual practice then is known by its fruits no matter what tradition it comes from.

The fruits of the spiritual journery include OPENNESS, PRESENCE, LISTENING, BEING, SEEING, SPONTANEITY, JOY AND PROFOUND PEACE.

In chapter 10 Teasdale suggests that we should open our hearts and consider the all encompassing idea of a universal mysticism where we commune and practice a spirituality as ONE. In so doing we will begin to heal our divisions through being contemplative, interspiritual, intermystical, socially engaged, environmentally responsible, holistic and integrating. Meditation and contemplation appear to be key to working on changing our inner world so that we can commune with others in action with more compassion and love.

This openess is the kind of attitude we need in our fragmented world. Excellent. A very hopeful vision of the future. Lots more I could say but don't want to spoil an enlightening and thought-provoking read that leaves one feeling quite buoyant.
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