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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An Historical Tale of Perfidy & An Epic Romeo/Juliet Romance, 24 Oct. 2005
The perfidious Massacre of Glencoe occurred at the village of Glencoe, Glen Coe, Scotland, during the predawn hours of February 13, 1692, during the period of the Glorious Revolution and the Jacobite Risings. Thirty-eight MacDonalds, including the MacIain, clan chieftain, were slaughtered by government troops, led by Captain Robert Campbell of Glen Lyon who had accepted the MacDonald's hospitality. Campbell had been ordered by the King's Master of the Stair, through the Governor of Fort William, to turn on his hosts, (including his own niece and her husband). Although he defended his actions with the "I was just following orders" excuse, Campbell, as a highlander, was well aware of the strictly held laws of Highland hospitality. His offense was, and still is, thought to be unforgivable by many.
Kings William II and III's policy in Scotland was to force clan chieftains to subscribe an oath of loyalty to the crown. MacIain of Glencoe was slow in doing so and eventually missed the deadline by a matter of days, although he did swear the oath. For his tardiness he and his were made "examples of." Those who were able to escape, primarily women and children, hid in the surrounding snowy mountains and died of exposure after their homes were burned. The MacDonald's and Campbell's, already immersed in bitter feuding, still maintain the feud three hundred years later. Campbells continue to suffer the opprobrium of the massacre and generations of Scots children have been taught "never trust a Campbell."
"Lady of the Glen's" subtitle is "a novel of 17th century Scotland and the Massacre of Glencoe," and the book accurately describes the heinous event which took place that morning in 1692 and the history leading up to it, as well as the fictitious Romeo and Juliet love story between Alasdair Og MacDonald, youngest son of the MacIain, and Catriona Campbell of Glen Lyon. Although Alasdair Og did, in fact, marry a Cambell of Glen Lyon, she was a niece to Glen Lyon not his daughter.
While Jennifer Roberson's narrative bogs down occasionally, she writes a fluid, intelligent prose and has an amazing grasp of the historical events, characters and political intrigue of the times. Her fictitious characters, especially Cat and Dair are wonderful, strong and believable - a really terrific and unusual heroine and hero. Because of the violence and terrible sadness, this is no light read and therefore not for everyone. The brutality of the clan wars is depicted with tremendous realism, as are the wonderful customs and culture of the Highlands. One can almost hear the bagpipes play. If you are a fan of good historical fiction and Scottish history in particular, you'll find this novel to be a winner - as I did. ENJOY!
JANA
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very enjoyable tale, 30 Jan. 2007
By 
Misfit (Seattle, WA USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This was a very good book and an enjoyable read. I really enjoyed the two main characters, Catriona (Cat) and Alasdair (Dair) a lovely Romeo and Juliet story. A pleasant change to have the heroine not be drop dead gorgeous. Their characters were well drawn, intelligent and displayed great chemistry. I enjoyed their playful banter as they "courted" and afterward when they become lovers. LOL when she became worried after their first time together in bed, as her brothers had always told Cat her tongue would shrivel a man's --- well you know what.

Even though when Cat and Dair get together they are a loving and lusty couple, the sex scenes are mostly left to the imagination and not overly drawn out, which helps make this book more appropriate for a younger reader than many books available these days. The author was able to convey much just with the subtle sexual banter betwen these two, it was very funny and sweet.

Although there is the "romance" of the book with the two main characters, this is more about the massacre of Glencoe, a little known piece of Scottish history, and a very sad tale for so many members of this clan. Don't let the cover of the book fool you, this is not a Julie Garwood type of book where the story is mostly fluff to place the H&H in in order to write steamy love scenes. And I'm not knocking Garwood, I loved Ransom -- this is just a different type of book altogether despite what it appears from the cover. If you are looking for a light book heavy on romance and light on the history, this book is not for you.

All in all quite an enjoyable read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An evocative and exceptionally well-researched novel., 27 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Lady of the Glen (Paperback)
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Whilst sometimes the dialogue seemed a little contrived and over-the-top, I was nonetheless very impressed with the amount of research the author had obviously undertaken. Scottish history, (including the story of Glen Coe), is of great interest to me and there were scenes in this book I found particularly moving. I was already familiar with the story of the massacre and therefore having the characters brought to life in this way was, at times, an almost harrowing experience.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Scotland of old; The people and the history combined!, 31 July 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Lady of the Glen (Paperback)
This book paints a wonderfully vivid story of the Highlanders life in Scotland; of the MacDonalds of Glencoe and the Campbells of GlenLyon; of the land of Scotland (all the places in this book are real) and, finally of the massacre of Glencoe. It is full of humor, of emotional struggles, of political plots and Scotland's history. It is a book to easily get engrossed in almost from the moment you pick it up. I learned a little, laughed a little, cried a little, but most of all, thoroughly enjoyed this tale.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent story, rooted in historical facts, 25 April 1999
By A Customer
I loved this story and wish the author would stay with historical fiction instead of fantasy. The story was rooted in fact, had believable characters, and was terrific to read. It ended in a trip to Scotland for me, so I would go for it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful prose, magnificent research, 17 April 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Lady of the Glen (Paperback)
From the first lyrical scene to the last page, LADY OF THE GLEN kept me riveted. I was enthralled by Ms. Roberson's use of all the senses in invoking a sense of time and place, and her ability to draw the reader into the book so effortlessly. Being familiar with the massacre of Glencoe, I marveled at her balance of fact and fiction to create a timeless masterpiece. Bravo! Ms Roberson, for a splendid work.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A real nice Historical Fiction Tale., 30 Mar. 1998
By A Customer
I picked up this book not knowing the story of the Glencoe Massacre but decided to read it because I like Lady of the Forest so much. This book was well written, enjoyable, moving and historically accurate. (After reading the book, I researched the topic!) Anyone who enjoys Scottish Historical Fiction will like this book but I have to admit, Lady of the Forest was my favorite.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A great book, read it, and you'll know, 19 Mar. 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Lady of the Glen (Paperback)
Lady of the Glen was quite possably the best book that I have ever read, with an exciting and unpredictable plot line, increadably real characters, and a perfectly described mileau that made it seem like I was really in Scotland, it pulled me into a historic world that made me laugh and cry along with the characters. A great read!
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Lady of the Glen
Lady of the Glen by Jennifer Roberson (Paperback - Sept. 2000)
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