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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Here begins the modern world
Hegel's book remains a forbidding, yet immensely influential piece of work-Lenin read it in 1914-17 to help sharpen his dialectical skills, and it remains of value even now in compelling the reader to think about the notion and essence of being. It is certainly not a light read-the writing style in English translation verges on the impenetrable at times, and Hegel writes...
Published on 20 April 2009 by Alexander G. Marshall

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars deserves so much better
Another rubbish electronic copy with bits missing etc. Think I'll stick with downloading pdf's and go to 'text to speech' on the iMac. These are the greatest books ever written and the morons who cauterise them like this should be shot.
Published 14 months ago by lastruebeliever


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Here begins the modern world, 20 April 2009
By 
Alexander G. Marshall "alexmarshall3" - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Hegel's "Science of Logic" (Paperback)
Hegel's book remains a forbidding, yet immensely influential piece of work-Lenin read it in 1914-17 to help sharpen his dialectical skills, and it remains of value even now in compelling the reader to think about the notion and essence of being. It is certainly not a light read-the writing style in English translation verges on the impenetrable at times, and Hegel writes in a deliberately abstract manner (though occasionally concrete examples are provided). But if approached methodically, taking notes as you go along, it remains one of the most intellectually rewarding books you could ever possibly read.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Start with the Absolute and keep on going, 20 July 2011
This review is of AV Miller's translation that appeared in Muirhead's Library of Philosophy in the 1970s. Having read it twice I feel entitled to comment, though many passages remain obscure to me even after considerable effort.

This is philosophy in pursuit of the 'Absolute', which is not what is usually meant by logic. The argument proceeds by naive intuition, followed by dialectic, arriving at a richer 'speculative' standpoint which then becomes a new starting point for further argument. The initial starting point is 'pure being', which is the height of abstraction and famously equated with 'pure nothing' (being in general is nothing in particular, so to speak) and said to result in 'becoming' (that includes being and nothing). Some say the real method is a progressive removal of layers of abstraction and the recovery of a common sense world view. However, it is probably more true to say that there is some active development of an intuition in the dialectic, which is not all of the same kind or equal in quality of argument.

There are three books, titled Being, Essence and the Concept. The first book discusses ideas of quality, quantity and measure at a very abstract level. I found the second easier going, as Hegel here develops a series of intelligible contrasts, from illusion and seeming through to appearance in a way that contrasts with Kant's absolute contrast of appearance with an unknowable 'thing-in-itself'. The third book recapitulates much of the earlier material in the form of a critique of Aristotelian Logic.

The previous Johnson & Struthers translation is often clearer, as Millar is infelicitous and literal in many places (e.g. 'negative positing' where the original has 'setzen' for positing and thus is not so paradoxical, the idea being of defining by exclusion). There is a very recent new translation by di Giovanni, but in any version you can expect to struggle with both the thought and the language. If you want something easier by Hegel, I'd try the much shorter Encyclopedia Logic or the more concrete and dramatic Phenomenology. Hegel's Philosophy of Reality, Freedom and God is a recent commentary on Hegel's Logic by Dr Robert M Wallace, sometime contributor to the Hegel-yahoo lists where there are free discussions of the text.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars deserves so much better, 1 July 2013
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This review is from: Science of Logic (Kindle Edition)
Another rubbish electronic copy with bits missing etc. Think I'll stick with downloading pdf's and go to 'text to speech' on the iMac. These are the greatest books ever written and the morons who cauterise them like this should be shot.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars bad bad bad, 1 July 2013
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This review is from: Science of Logic (Kindle Edition)
Someone is having a laugh, a very poor kindle version, big chunks missing, contents doesn't work, even if it was free it would be a rip off
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5.0 out of 5 stars Science of logic, 29 April 2013
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Together with "The Phenomenology of Spirit" all of philosophy since Hegel could be said to be an ongoing dialogue with his position and argument. This is central to the work and to understanding Marx as Lenin said, but it is so much more than that.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hegel's very good, 19 April 2013
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This review is from: Hegel's "Science of Logic" (Paperback)
Hegel has been a massive inspiration to me. I lectured on his philosophy very enjoyably at City University in 1996 on the recommendation of Dr Alfons Grieder, the greatest, most obscure and unproductive philosopher. Hegel's logic remains a challenge that is nevertheless not beyond consciousness. I do not want to climb this mountain of thought but just admire it from a distance. I know he's genuine and meant everything he said. Only recently have I come to integrate a Hegelian perspective into my own life properly. Here is an example of mine of Hegel inspired writing.

Thinking, in Kantian terms, is neither content (sense) nor form (concept).Thinking is the presupposition of both.

Thinking embraces contradictions more readily than knowledge. Knowledge seeks the singularity of light. Thinking embraces light and dark at the same time in bi-unity. Thinking is Hegelian (Hegel's reason - vernuft). Knowledge is Aristotelian (Hegel's understanding- verstand).
Knowledge is like a thought. Thinking is like a subject and a thought together.Thinking is like a flower and the sun. Thinking is like the sun in the sky. Thinking is like two people in the world at the same time even separated.

A thinking as opposed to knowledge:

"I - the other I seem to be - am not." A dosser looks at a judge and thinks "I know what you're thinking about me and it's wrong" - in one act the hand grasps and lets go. A thinking that affirms and negates in one motion. A living contradiction. This proves the non-bodily and ironic nature of consciousness. The body cannot do this since it deals with only one thing after another. Only consciousness can say "yes" and "no" at the same time. This shows that consciousness and the body are not the same.

The judge only thinks of his own thinking in one undivided, outgoing sweep. He stares coldly.He doesn't even have a separate sense of self.

Love is a pure letting go, two openness making one space, a simple identity.

The truth about personal identity can be thought of as: Individual of individuals.

Another thinking:

If a person is free is he open or self-contained or both?

If he is merely self-contained and his freedom can't grow then this is a restricted freedom.

@Pontifex If, on the other hand, he is simply an openness without a centre, who or what is free?

Freedom in itself does not make sense, it must belong to someone. Even Buddhist nirvana is not a purely abstract state, not a state of total non-self (anatman) but is the property of someone, a self. Freedom may be an ideal but even this ideal exists within the reach of the thought of the soul. Ideals are like things seen in dreams which are given not monotonously but from perspectives which admit of more and less. There are degrees of closeness to ideals even though they exist within. The inner world is not a blank surface but has nuances and structures. Within the space of consciousness there is great variety.

Maybe true freedom involves being a definite self that is open to the possibility of unboundedness.

Being definite allows for independence, being open allows for unrestrictedness.

I see in this the teaching of the Maharishi about point and infinity.

The point is this: point (attention) and infinity (awareness) can coexist in one consciousness at the same time.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seaside Hegel, 17 April 2013
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This review is from: Science of Logic (Kindle Edition)
Hegel says philosophy is its own time captured in thought. Hegel did not claim that he could see the future. He would have to acknowledge that even His own evolutionary view of the history of philosophy was a reflection of the givens of his time. Maybe Hegel couldn't help but see philosophy in this way given the limits of his time and place.

Ideas have a history outside of time. Hegel's logic is an account of how ideas develop into one another but develop independent of time.

I find Hegel's Logic fascinating, although I don't understand much about it. To me it is like the seaside that you can smell from a distance without seeing it up close. In the future I would like to see the beach, the pebbles, and swim in Hegel's Logic.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars the book of the books, 9 Mar 2009
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Maria L. Pedraza "crazy mum" (kingston, Surrey England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Hegel's "Science of Logic" (Paperback)
This book is the most interesting adquisition I've made...now, I'll try to understand it, cause you know, it is Hegel
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Hegel's "Science of Logic"
Hegel's "Science of Logic" by A.V. Miller (Paperback - 19 Dec 1998)
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