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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dated, but still a must-read.
This book is coming of age! The repulsive force postulated by Paul Hill back in 1975 has just been discovered according to Piyare Jain, an astrophysicist at the University of Buffalo, writing in the British Journal of Nuclear and Particle Physics. This would constitute a fifth fundamental force joining the four others of unification fame. At the time of writing (March 30,...
Published on 30 Mar 1998

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3.0 out of 5 stars OK as a primer, but needs a little something extra
I'm about half way through this book, so I might still change my mind later on, but based on what I've read this book is OK as a primer to the less "wacky" aspects of the UFO phenomena, though I find it wanting in some areas.

Where this book differs from a lot of the other books out there, is that the author (a former NASA scientist) isn't trying to prove that...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dated, but still a must-read., 30 Mar 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Unconventional Flying Objects: A Scientific Analysis (Paperback)
This book is coming of age! The repulsive force postulated by Paul Hill back in 1975 has just been discovered according to Piyare Jain, an astrophysicist at the University of Buffalo, writing in the British Journal of Nuclear and Particle Physics. This would constitute a fifth fundamental force joining the four others of unification fame. At the time of writing (March 30, 1998) it's too early to say whether this force is here to stay or just a collection of experimental errors; time will tell. The book, however, is a MUST READ for anyone purporting to study UFOs.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Paul R Hill's Unconvention, 30 Dec 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Unconventional Flying Objects: A Scientific Analysis (Paperback)
Better than the average UFO book, although it's time has past. This treatment shows it's age through a reliance on an information carrier particle for gravity (the 'graviton') and some interestingly selective UFO reports used to confirm the text.
However, the basic grounding in science and engineering and the simple way that Hill writes about the subject without getting too technical makes this a must buy for Skeptics and believers alike.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book, no matter what you think of UFOs., 29 Sep 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Unconventional Flying Objects: A Scientific Analysis (Paperback)
I dare anyone to read this book and come out thinking the same way about UFO's as before. Though occasionally boring in it's technical language, it is absolutely fascinating. Hill proves his point, "UFOs obey, not defy, the laws of physics."
It has often been said that some real, scientific research should be done on UFOs. This book is an answer to that.
Undoubtably the best UFO book ever written.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Historical data is proven valuable yet again., 27 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Unconventional Flying Objects: A Scientific Analysis (Paperback)
Consider that many paleontologists find that the best place to go fossil hunting is in a museum. The reason is of course, that many field collectors from the past have stored incredible fossil finds in museum archives, while having little or no time to evaluate the data and draw conclusions. What could this possibly have to do with Paul Hill's fabulous book? Mr. Hill did what real sceintists should do...he sorted through historical UFO data (including his own sighting) and looked for mechanisms and the patterns inherent to that data. By applying his own form of "back engineering" to these UFO cases, he sought to determine the power source(s), electromagnetic byproducts of those sources and other important aerodynamic components intrinsic to UFO flight characteristics. The results of his back engineering provide incredible information from "seemingly" insignificant details, much in the same way that Sherlock Holmes deduced Watsons' whereabouts by the mud on his shoes. Other physical scientists take note: All that UFO researches have asked of you for years was to look at the data, much as the late Dr. Hynek suggested. Finally, Paul Hill has done it. I know there are other scientists (personally) who are continuing to investigate using the same stringent scientific methods used by Paul Hill. I applaud you, as do all meaningful UFO researchers. For Mr. Hill, I would say that it was too bad the climate of yellow journalism did not allow the release of this important work before his death. The press in this country is veneer. But, over time, veneer peels up to reveal the oak. Take heed, read Unconventional Flying Objects. Think.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An outstanding analysis of UFO propulsion., 23 Aug 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Unconventional Flying Objects: A Scientific Analysis (Paperback)
This is a very rare and excellent analysis of UFO propulsion where a NASA scientist (now deceased) systematically and methodically determines that the only way UFO's can manoever as they are seen to is by utilizing ANTIGRAVITATIONAL field technology. His scientific logic is very convincing. Written by the same man who carried out the investigation. Also, he was privy to more raw data through his work at NASA than ordinarily possible.
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3.0 out of 5 stars OK as a primer, but needs a little something extra, 10 May 2014
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This review is from: Unconventional Flying Objects: A Scientific Analysis (Paperback)
I'm about half way through this book, so I might still change my mind later on, but based on what I've read this book is OK as a primer to the less "wacky" aspects of the UFO phenomena, though I find it wanting in some areas.

Where this book differs from a lot of the other books out there, is that the author (a former NASA scientist) isn't trying to prove that UFOs exist, or to debunk them. They are instead comparing witness observations to know phenomena in physics, and seeing if any other fit.

Using a process of elimination, and using only accepted mainstream physics, the author concludes that the sights\effects from UFO witness reports are entirely plausible. If UFOS (Whatever they are) actually exist, then they don't do anything that can't be done based on the laws of physics. In fact, so many sources seem to agree with each other, and with mainstream scientific principals, that they actually act to confirm each other. Something that you would not see if a lot of witnesses simply made things up for 15 minutes of fame, or if they were really looking at weather balloons.

The author also concludes that most reports of UFOs seen at close range have movements that fit a clearly defined pattern, and that this pattern (when used in conjunction with known physics), has set rules that can be used to calculate things such as thrust and G-force load during turning. Which suggests that people are witnessing the same phenomena. Rather than hundreds of different phenomena (Such as the planet Venus, and flocks of birds) as conventional wisdom states.

Where this book tends to fall down is that in trying to make their book accessible the author has had to dumb down the subject matter quite a bit, and they're not very good at it.

The author is trying to write using a conversational style, and to use layman's terms so as to make the book accessible to people who don't have a scientific background. Unfortunately, their writing style isn't suited to it, and the concepts that they introduce (such as high energy physics) will tend to go over the head of a lot of people. Leaving them feeling confused and\or unconvinced. It's also a bit boring to read.

In addition to this, in simplifying things for "the average reader" the author has left out a lot of the data that readers with a more scientific background will be looking for. To a scientist, much of this book will come across as being anecdotal, simply because the author has left out some of the more interesting\complicated science, and doesn't cite their sources in much depth. Which is pretty frustrating as it's difficult to verify what they are saying scientifically unless you already know the subject.

The author does go into the math for some of their calculations on things such as G-Force and turning. But this is a big dull and dry. It's also nothing new as it's very similar to that used for fixed wing aircraft.

Some parts of the book, such as observations about the apparent presence of high energy plasma during UFO sightings, would be OK as explanations if they were used as a 5 minute segment on a TV documentary, but I'd prefer if they'd gone in to more depth.

The author knows the subject, and could probably go into great depth during a debate with other scientists, but doesn't really do much to demonstrate this in the actual book because most of the readers aren't going to be scientists.

Overall, this book is a good primer on UFOs and physics, but it doesn't really break any new ground, or give you much to debate a true believer\debunker with unless you already know the topic.

I brought a used copy, I consider it to be well worth the money. If I'd payed full retail I would have been less happy.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A key work about alien propulsion, hull and crew protection systems, 14 Oct 2013
I bought this book in printed paper format in 2009, and my copy is now so worn-out from frequent use that the arrival of the "immortal" Kindle edition with the facility to search instantly for particular subjects, names, observations, or encounters, etc. has been very welcome.

It is evident that Professor Hill brought a lifetime of aerospace knowledge and experience from his career with NASA and its predecessor organisation, to his analysis of selected reports of alien aerospace craft that were mostly observed or encountered landed on or hovering over, taking off from or landing on, the surface of the Earth, or flying over it. He reached firm conclusions about how the smaller types of alien aerospace craft that operated relatively close to the Earth were propelled, and their hulls and any users protected, and also proposed how the aliens' larger "motherships" might travel between different star systems.

Professor Hill concluded that smaller alien aerospace craft were propelled and their hulls and users protected, by what Marc Millis has called "synthetic acceleration force fields": "After Rockets?" by Mr. Marc G. Millis, MSc., who managed NASA's Breakthrough Propulsion Physics project and founded the Tau Zero Foundation, in the "Imaging the Future - Brave New Worlds" series of articles in the leading global aviation and aerospace trade magazine "Aviation Week & Space Technology", October 24/31 2011, page 76.

Professor Hill proposed that self-energised, larger alien interstellar craft used synthetic acceleration force fields for only a few hours when departing under high acceleration from a star system. The alien starships focussed and directed their synthetic acceleration propulsion force fields against massive bodies in space, such as a planet or star.

The starships' propulsion systems subsequently changed over to a form of rocket thrust based on force-carrying particles until a coasting velocity close to light speed was reached. Arrival in a star system probably involved decelerating using this form of "rocket thrust" and then changing back to synthetic acceleration force fields to slow or stop close to a planet or central star.

My own interest began when in the course of routine reading to keep up-to-date with scientific and technological developments generally, I first learned of the experimental and theoretical work of Professor Martin Tajmar and his team at "Space Propulsion and Advanced Concepts", Austrian Research Centers GmbH (ARC), now the Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH (AIT): "Gravity's secret", by Dr. Stuart Clark, FRAS, published in New Scientist magazine, 11 November 2006, No. 2577, pages 36 - 39.

I read most of the original reports of the observations and encounters that Professor Hill discussed in his book, and (being only a technology lawyer with just basic, high school-level mathematics, physics and chemistry) tried to understand and apply some of his simpler mathematical formulae. After some practice it became fun to calculate things like the mass density and mass of some alien aerospace craft whose dimensions, etc. had been accurately reported, and then try to calculate the amount of energy required for a particular craft to hover or accelerate at a particular rate.

Online tools and spreadsheets (e.g. Microsoft Excel) have greatly simplified calculations, and it is no longer necessary to hand-draw tabular and graphic outputs, as it appears Professor Hill may have done in the book. However, the book states that some "drawings are computer-generated" possibly due to the efforts of Dr. Robert M. Wood, another aerospace scientist and engineer, who was acknowledged for his "invaluable assistance" in preparing the book for publication.

Professor Hill completed the book in 1975. This was the decade in which the output (journals, special reports, books, etc.) of serious, observation and encounter-report-focussed, international teams of what we would now call "citizen scientists" that underpinned the U.S.-based A.P.R.O. and the UK-based "Flying Saucer Review" reached their peak levels. However, Professor Hill's book was not published until 1995.

The total number of subscribers to all of the serious, printed paper UFO journals in the English language that were published around this time may have been under 10,000 people. This contrasts with the availability online today, of literally hundreds of millions of citizen scientists who potentially, have the education and time to use the work that has been done by Professor Hill and many others to try to provide the new transportation propulsion and energy generation science and technology that humankind so desperately needs.

Discoveries of worlds around other ordinary stars - the exoplanets - began in 1995 and in 2013 no fewer than three exoplanets were announced to be orbiting within the habitable zone of a single star system. These and many other related observations and analyses suggest that Professor Hill was correct in his analysis and conclusions. That is, it may not be necessary to propose that alien craft and aliens come from other dimensions, through wormholes, from the future, etc. The popularity of such speculative ideas during the last part of the 20th century was perhaps due to reports of alien transportation systems and their users continuing to accumulate, while our astronomical technology was not yet advanced sufficiently to detect or image other worlds.

Professor Hill's work demonstrated that the aliens could have travelled in advanced spaceships to visit us, and anyone who is motivated to use their high school maths and science can check his analysis and conclusions, and go on to make further discoveries, and develop interesting and possibly useful hypotheses of their own. For example, many reports that describe alien aerospace craft may provide hints about how their synthetic acceleration propulsion force fields may be generated. Also, simple calculations of the amount of energy required for the craft to perform as they have been observed to do, narrows the range of possible ways in which they might generate this energy.

Following the discoveries made by the Kepler planet-hunting space telescope and other space and Earth-based observatories, expert astronomers have confidently predicted that there are probably billions of potentially-habitable planets just in our galaxy. Therefore, since many of these planets may be home to civilisations that are millions or even billions of years older than humankind, no possibility should be ruled out. The volume and variety of alien transportation systems, aliens, their surrogates, and their activities that have been reported, including the strangest reports, seem quite plausible in this context.

The strenuous efforts of aliens or their surrogates since at least the late 19th century to spread disinformation or misinformation about the real nature of their transportation systems (mentioned in more detail in some of my other book reviews) suggests that at least some of their science and technology - hopefully including their propulsion, hull and user protection, and energy generation systems - might be acquired, or duplicated, and applied by us in the near future. This in turn suggests that it is worthwhile to study Professor Hill's work and observation and encounter reports of the type he analysed.

I am not aware of any other book that comes close to what Professor Hill achieved, and recommend reading and using his work in conjunction with selected reports of alien craft, many decades worth of which are available in the publications of the teams that contributed to and operated A.P.R.O. and the "Flying Saucer Review", and other "citizen science" organisations dedicated to collecting reports about, investigating, analysing, and producing publications about the phenomena.

Many original reports and analyses are now available to purchase in books, on disc, or view or download online, as well as video and audio files of historical and contemporary interviews, news reports, documentaries, dramatisations, etc. of compilations of, or particular observations or encounters.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A very credible study of the UFO phenomenon., 5 May 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Unconventional Flying Objects: A Scientific Analysis (Paperback)
This is the book sceptics of the UFO field will wish had never been written - because it will rattle them.
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Unconventional Flying Objects: A Scientific Analysis
Unconventional Flying Objects: A Scientific Analysis by Paul R. Hill (Paperback - 23 Mar 1995)
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