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34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ellectric Guitars: The Illustrated Encyclopedia
Tony Bacon has succeeded in compiling the best encyclopaedia on electric guitars that I have seen yet. This is a wonderfully illustrated record of almost any make of commercially sold electric guitar from budget priced axes to the great names in the world of the electric guitar. Even forgotten names like ‘Egmund’ can be found along with many other makes that...
Published on 25 Nov. 2002 by D. Kyle

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars Lots a of great pictures and loads of interesting facts
Lots a of great pictures and loads of interesting facts.
Unfortunately not all the 'facts' are accurate, many of the dates are wrong, some are contradicting, and lots of missing info paints an incorrect history.
They should have done their research. 38 pages on Fender and 52 on Gibson, but no entry for Matsumoku or Fujigen (the two most prolific manufacturers of...
Published 8 months ago by sarah


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34 of 34 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ellectric Guitars: The Illustrated Encyclopedia, 25 Nov. 2002
By 
D. Kyle (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Electric Guitars: The Illustrated Encyclopedia (Hardcover)
Tony Bacon has succeeded in compiling the best encyclopaedia on electric guitars that I have seen yet. This is a wonderfully illustrated record of almost any make of commercially sold electric guitar from budget priced axes to the great names in the world of the electric guitar. Even forgotten names like ‘Egmund’ can be found along with many other makes that I had never heard of before. The photographic illustrations are very high quality and are accompanied by detailed descriptions of the guitars, notes on their designers and histories of the factories that produced and still produce these marvellous instruments. I would especially recommend this book to anyone who is a serious collector, player or builder of the electric guitar.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very comprehensive compulsive reading for a type..., 22 Mar. 2005
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This review is from: Electric Guitars: The Illustrated Encyclopedia (Hardcover)
Well it is if this is your thing: pictures and histories of brands of guitars. Every conceivable manufacturer is in here and in some detail. It'll have you trawling second hand shops for that rarity in no time.
Great book, great pictures, very addictive!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE BEST GUITAR ENCYCLOPEDIA EVER!!!, 9 Feb. 2007
THIS IS THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE GUITAR MANUAL AROUND. IDEAL FOR COLLECTORS AND MAKERS ALIKE. EVERY MAKE AND MODEL EXPLAINED!!!I PERSONALLY COLLECT GUITARS AND THIS WAS VERY HELPFULL INDEED. THE BOOK IT'S SELF IS VERY COLLECTABLE AND HARD TO FIND IN IT'S ORIGINAL PRINT.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I Sleep With This Book, 27 Dec. 2008
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This review is from: Electric Guitars: The Illustrated Encyclopedia (Hardcover)
I have a dream to collect each of those gorgeous Guitars in the world - Ibanez Jem, Fender Strat, Fender Tele, Gretsch Jet Firebird, Gibson Les Paul, PRS 513, Dean Flying V and more. That's only when I become a millionaire. But for now this book is doing me fine. Cost me only tenner. Brand new.

History of electric guitars, history of more than 100 different makers from small to big, details to some extent of every single model. And all 300 pages full of colorful, bright, clear, sexy pictures of Guitars ... Ooohh My !!! Just looking at the pictures, turning on pages randomly makes me feel so so so good. I look as much as I can. I touch as much I can. Sad !!! I can't play with them. It's my Playboy mag. Yeah ....

I learnt a lot about girls, I mean, Guitars from this book. It's big and very informative. You love Guitars, you will definitely love this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent and informative book., 10 Sept. 2010
This review is from: Electric Guitars: The Illustrated Encyclopedia (Hardcover)
Physically very large, not one for carrying around but a genuinely useful reference book for buyers or even just the casually interested.

10 years old now but as it's as much a reference to the history of the manufacturers rather than their current lines that's not really a problem. A few ommissions but all the bigh names you'd expect are in there. Excellent Fender and Gibson articles along with plent of other interesting info.

Each manufacturer contains the main article, side articles along with usefull snippets aling the top margin. There is a wealth of photo's in here of the guitars, the players, the makers and even repoduced old adverts.

If your thinking of doing some buying on eBay use this book to tell you at least a little history about the products you may see on their.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Must Have! But..., 10 Jan. 2012
This review is from: Electric Guitars: The Illustrated Encyclopedia (Hardcover)
I've bought a spate of guitar "encyclopedias" just recently but this is by far the best and most comprehensive. It is not just a spotters book of guitars it is also filled with anecdotal information, rare photographs etc. Well worth a browse. The book is a good size too which I like- bigger pictures.
Yet it is not without flaws. My major criticism is that a book calling itself an "Encyclopedia" cannot be tailored for a specific market. This book is quite unashamedly aimed at an American market, no doubt to maximize appeal to the large US market and thereby make more money. I am not talking about the American spelling, I am talking about the omissions. There are 130+ marques represented. 800 guitars and 1200 photographs yet the bias of the work is designed to appeal more to US readers, to the exclusion of European/worldwide readers. There is a massive oversight in the under-representation of UK/European luthiers. There are less than a dozen British makes represented in this book. These are mostly older UK brands like Burns, Baldwin, Fenton Weill, Grimshaw, Hayman, Shergold, Vox, and Watkins (some of these are closely related too and some long gone). But since 1975 there have be at least 30 professional luthiers and/or guitar manufacturers in the UK. Many of these are no flash in the pan either. Manson Guitars have been making guitars since 1975 are highly respected with an impressive client list and Manson Guitars are not represented in this book. They are certainly higher profile than some of the modern one-offs included here. So of a potential 30 recent British luthiers/manufacturers the compilers have chosen five British guitar builders/luthiers; Bond (existed for 1984 only), John Birch, Gordon-Smith, Eggle and Zemaitis (And I'm absolutely sure he was included only because his name begins with a "Z"!) Also the claim that "Tony Zemaitis made the highest-profile British guitars of the 20th century" is somewhat subjective, I rather think in the 1960s Vox and Burns both had a high-profile.
Perhaps the compilers will claim to have tried to confine the entries to factory production rather than the work of individual luthiers. Then why include the afore mentioned John Birch and Tony Zemaitis? They're bespoke luthiers. Anyway the book is full of one-offs and bespoke luthier work, just not British ones. Effectively there are only two recent/active UK brands represented; Gordon-Smith which are given one paragraph and one smallish photo, and Eggle given one paragraph and the Eggle photo chosen is a PRS copy!
Why are there a full 18 pages and forty-four photographs devoted to PRS Guitars? Now I like PRS but this is massively disproportionate there are more photographs of PRS solid bodies than Gibson Les Pauls! Rickenbacker get 11 pages by way of comparison. I expect significant entries on Fender and Gibson but I fail to see the coverage given to some other marques, in particular PRS. It may well be that PRS are the third largest US manufacturer as this book claims but once you have seen one maple-top, twin humbucker, PRS guitar you've seen 'em all and you dont need to see another THIRTY+ This is all the more irritating when there are so many omissions and more interesting marques given scant coverage.
If it is an encyclopedia should it not cover as many marques as possible rather than what looks like a personal selection designed to appeal to one country in particular? Dont give us the lame excuse that "there wasn't space for everyone". Well there was plenty space for screeds of very similar looking PRS guitars and to be honest we are all getting a little tired of endless Gibson and Fender histories taking up massive space in such books. Gibson and Fender history has been done to death, we've seen it all before ad nauseum. Lets face it if you're buying this book your very likely to have seen a 1952 Telecaster, a 1957 Stratocaster, and a 1959 Les Paul Standard before. And believe me if you've bought any Tony Bacon guitar histories you've seen these very photographs too.
I think this volume could have pared down that which we have all seen countless times before, cut the PRS entry by two-thirds and added some guitars more globally representative. Maybe then it could aspire to be an encyclopedia.
This volume pretty much looks like a stitched together compilation of the pet works of the various authors padded out with smaller brands given brief mention. Far too much on the American big names and far too little on the rest of the world.
That said this remains the best guitar encyclopedia so far. It is an absolute must for a guitar enthusiast. Despite the omissions I would still heartily recommend it.
Word of caution do not get ripped-off when buying it. I got a perfectly acceptable copy for 99pence so I wouldn't pay the £100 I see some crooks asking.
We have yet to see a purely scholarly and truly comprehensive encyclopedia on the Electric Guitar and perhaps the subject is considered too trivial to waste such research upon, and we will never see one.
In the meantime this is the Electric Guitar Encyclopedia to get.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars latest edition of an old favorite!, 22 May 2009
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D. T. Taylor - See all my reviews
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this guy has been a master at compiling guitar info books and this latest edition has to be had...it contains all the info and artists that use them as well...well done Tony...and thanx to Amazon for sending it quickly(it came the next day!!!)do you work all night?...dave taylor uk
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2.0 out of 5 stars Lots a of great pictures and loads of interesting facts, 8 July 2014
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This review is from: Electric Guitars: The Illustrated Encyclopedia (Hardcover)
Lots a of great pictures and loads of interesting facts.
Unfortunately not all the 'facts' are accurate, many of the dates are wrong, some are contradicting, and lots of missing info paints an incorrect history.
They should have done their research. 38 pages on Fender and 52 on Gibson, but no entry for Matsumoku or Fujigen (the two most prolific manufacturers of the 70's and 80's, who made at least 80% of the worlds guitars for most major brands during that period), they are only mentioned in passing in sections on other brands.
Still a useful, if somewhat unreliable, source.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Electric Guitars, 10 April 2009
By 
D. Marsden (England) - See all my reviews
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I bought this book after reading one on guitars by the same author. I have just built a guitar and wanted a book with lots of different styles of electric guitar so I could pick another style to build and learn a little more about styles. This book has got just about every type of electric guitar you can imagine. It is well illustrated with notes added and also a few great guitar players thrown in. If your interest is electric guitars then I would recommend this book. If you want to see what a certain electric guitar looks like, then the chances are you'll find it in this book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!, 16 Feb. 2011
This review is from: Electric Guitars: The Illustrated Encyclopedia (Hardcover)
Excellent book, really nicely laid out and really interesting if your an electric guitar nut like me! took a while to arrive, but really pleased with it!
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Electric Guitars: The Illustrated Encyclopedia
Electric Guitars: The Illustrated Encyclopedia by Tony Bacon (Hardcover - Sept. 2000)
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