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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Evolutionary Psychology
Interesting that this book is being condemned as not being fit the "average reader" as the author deals with the topic of eugenics where the superior and inferior were amply documented by those who felt the requirement to grade humanity. This book deals with the counter communist/socialist reaction occurring at the beginning of the 20th Century, starting in the...
Published 14 months ago by Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles

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4 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Amazingly detailed, but not interesting
It's a very informative book, and would seriously recommend it if you are interested in eugenics.

Nevertheless, it is a rather boring read. I'm on page 94 and I'm starting to lose my mind. Black pretty much summed up why the book sucks on page xxii. "Frankly, I had amassed enough information to write a freestanding book for each of the twenty-one chapters in...
Published on 3 Aug. 2008 by Peyman Askari


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Evolutionary Psychology, 7 Dec. 2013
By 
Dr. Delvis Memphistopheles "FIST" (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Interesting that this book is being condemned as not being fit the "average reader" as the author deals with the topic of eugenics where the superior and inferior were amply documented by those who felt the requirement to grade humanity. This book deals with the counter communist/socialist reaction occurring at the beginning of the 20th Century, starting in the late 19th Century.

Galton, Darwin's cousin took his ideas and tried to formulate a view which put him at the top of an apex and the "colonial races" he lusted after as a somewhat beneath him. Thinking about why superior types bred superior types led him to project himself along the social caste lines of his era to delineate a self fulfilling prophecy - those who are better educated within the habitus of the era, end up on top, and those who do not receive an education into the magical doctrines score lowly when tested.

And so began a scientific craze to tabulate the world according to personal assumptions which fed into a wider tableau. Picked up by the big American trust funds and "scientific backers" including Mrs. Harriman, Carnegie, Loeb and Rockefeller, each funded "scientists" to prove that being a "robber baron" was a superior type of human being to being a worker. So a series of "objective" tests were formulated and applied to those who were paupers, alcoholics, mentally diseased and all the other outcasts until ultimately it came to the "feeble minded." The latter were people who were outside the social world neatly constructed by the upper classes.

In came Laughlin and Davenport who were crazed zealots who set about to do their masters bidding and in their stead recreate the world in their image. In effect, after they disposed of God, they rebuilt him in their image. They set the templates based on Nordic superiority on who was "fit" and who was not. The first aim was to cull 10% of their own Nordic "dross" and so their ideas were taken up in Virginia by Priddy, the man who ran the local lunatic asylum and were applied to Carrie Buck. Due to her mother being incarcerated in the same institute in Virginia a case precedent could be set based upon Mendelian genetics to prove feeble-mindedness transcended the generations.

A conspiracy (yes they do exist and this book shows how it was undertaken) involved a series of men across Virginia and the ERO set about creating a case precedent which pulled in the greatest of American law pronouncers Wendell Holmes. This US great lit the touch paper for the eugenics catastrophe which was about to consume the 20th Century in fire. Sanctioning the Carrie Buck sterilisation, based as the author details, on his own psychological projections on "fitness" he gave the go ahead. As a result the cross fertilisation of ideas between the US and Germany continuing up until the late 1930's led to a eugenics race. Who could enact both positive eugenics (getting the fit ones to produce more children) and negative eugenics (undertaking a selective cull). Filled with ideas about "race suicide" hatred of women, East Europeans and as it turns out - cockneys, Irish etc the picture was set for a reconfiguring of the human race.

Birth Control undertaken under the guise of Planned Parenthood was also involved, demarcating the role of feminism within this human catastrophe, (so much for solidarity sisterhood) leading to the work of twins undertaken by Verschuer and Mengele at Auschwitz who dissected bodies of young adults and children to find the elixir of their alleged difference. Pulling in IQ tests to delineate the feeble, moronic, idiotic as well as the great the social parameters were duly set.

This is a great book marred by the finale. Let me tell you a secret - there is no gene for alcoholism, homosexuality, heroin use, or mental health illness. These were made up categories by these eugenically driven madmen to constrain and bottle the world so they could dispense their wisdom. Brain scan imaging to discover personality traits as opposed to physical abnormalities is also bogus. The book pulls up short when it should have plunged further into the realms of make believe fantasy. These categories are all part of the wider con.

However up until that point, this lifts the lid on the hidden shroud of the 20th Century to reveal the pure vile nastiness which resided in men and women's minds. Take a deep breath and hold your nose, this is a roller coaster into vileness which has infected so many peoples minds they take it for granted.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars War Against the Weak: Eugenics and America's Campaign to Create a Master Race, 22 Jun. 2012
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This book was mentioned in the bibliography of a novel I was reading and the author had also written a short piece about eugenics. It wasn't really something I knew anything about so I bought this book to learn more. I'm about halfway through and I can't put it down. The book is well written and it isn't sensationalist. Eugenics is a difficult and emotive topic but presenting the facts as they are somehow makes them all the more shocking. Parts of it make uncomfortable reading but I would thoroughly recommend this book to anyone wanting to more about eugenics.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A masterpiece of documentation, 15 May 2009
By 
Old Bloke (Edinburgh, Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: War Against the Weak: Eugenics and America's Campaign to Create a Master Race (Paperback)
A dark, dark page of American history has been laid open here for future generations. This book has quite clearly been a genuine labour of love, thoroughly researched with all evidence gained painstakingly documented, ensuring that this widely unknown topic will never be forgotten. Please read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing Piece of Research, 15 Aug. 2013
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This review is from: War Against the Weak: Eugenics and America's Campaign to Create a Master Race (Paperback)
The headline says it all. This is a chilling account of America's contributions to the Nazi Holocaust; and now—beware "Newgenics".
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An important book, shedding light on a long-neglected era in American history..., 9 Dec. 2013
By 
C. Ball (Derbyshire) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: War Against the Weak: Eugenics and America's Campaign to Create a Master Race (Paperback)
So much attention has been paid to the means and methods of the Nazi's appalling atrocities during World War II, to the institutional, bureaucratic and legislative infrastructure created to support those actions and the race hatred that impelled them - but little attention has been paid up to the supposed scientific foundations that underlay all of the Nazis' beliefs and justifications. Everyone knows of the Nazis' belief in racial superiority, in the desire for a 'master race', an Aryan race of Nordic supermen - but those beliefs were founded on a pseudo-science called eugenics.

Surprisingly that pseudo-science found its greatest 'success', at least until the advent of Hitler and the totalitarian state of Nazi Germany, in America. Indeed, in this book Black convincingly argues that the 'science' of eugenics was founded in America and later transplanted to Germany. Whilst the term and the concept largely originated in England, there it was never more than theory, whereas it took root and actual expression in many states in America. Through organisations and experimental laboratories founded in large part by notable philanthropic bodies such as the Carnegie Institute and Rockefeller Foundation, American eugenicists, including Margaret Sanger of Planned Parenthood, lobbied Congress, state governments, public health bodies, institutions and care homes, to institute a national program aimed, effectively, weeding out the 'inferior stock' and increasing the ranks of the superior, namely the Anglo-Saxon and Nordic 'races'.

Whilst America never went as far as involuntary euthanasia, many states (over half) did implement laws legislating for involuntary sterilization, marriage restrictions, segregation, immigration restrictions - all designed to prevent those deemed inferior - whether because of intelligence levels, race, religion, hereditary illness or even alcoholism - from breeding and therefore perpetuating and spreading their 'defects' through the body public. California in particular led the way in this movement, with over one third of all compulsory sterilizations in the United States taking place in that state, some 20,000.

One of the truly horrifying revelations in this book was the extent of the legislation and how long the influence of eugenics lingered, and continues to do so. Even though the concept of 'eugenics' fell from favour after World War II and the revelations of the Holocaust, many advocates simply slipped quite effortlessly into the new field of 'genetics', a field Black argues is simply eugenics under another name and shorn of its social and racial elements. Many states took decades after WW2 to repeal their eugenics and miscegenation legislation, and some states continued to perform compulsory sterilization. Indeed, there is evidence that compulsory sterilization is still taking place within California's penal system.

This wasn't an easy read, both in style and in content. The author notes in his preface that each chapter could have been a book on its own, and I can see why. Many chapters feel like stand-alone papers, and Black does occasionally repeat himself or go over the same ground from a slightly different angle. By the time I'd read certain quotes three or four times in different contexts I was getting a little tired. But it is an immensely important book, shedding real light on a topic that has shamefully managed to evade the glaring light of public and academic scrutiny for too long and serving as a real warning to scientists who focus so minutely on aspects of human biology that they become lost in the biology and forget the humanity.
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4 of 12 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Amazingly detailed, but not interesting, 3 Aug. 2008
By 
Peyman Askari (SOTON, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: War Against the Weak: Eugenics and America's Campaign to Create a Master Race (Paperback)
It's a very informative book, and would seriously recommend it if you are interested in eugenics.

Nevertheless, it is a rather boring read. I'm on page 94 and I'm starting to lose my mind. Black pretty much summed up why the book sucks on page xxii. "Frankly, I had amassed enough information to write a freestanding book for each of the twenty-one chapters in this volume." And essentially, that's what he did. He made every chapter far too long.
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