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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hunters of Gor, John Norman
Hunters of Gor in 1 sentence: Bosk of Port Kar moves to the Northern Forests, home of the Panther Girls.
Tarl Cabot (now known as Bosk of Port Kar) hears that the love of his life, Talena, has been seen, enslaved, in the Northern Forests of Gor. Home to the Panther Girls of Gor. He decides to go rescue her, and when he hears that Marlenus, Ubar of Ar, is in the...
Published on 12 Nov 2003

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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Pointless
I like the Gor books because when he gets it right, they are good sword and fantasy novels. When he gets them wrong though!
The style of the writing is pompous repeatative statements. The narrator repeats the same phrase over and over again. Norman becomes obsessed with slavery and chains. Every single scene goes into minute details of how the slave girls are...
Published on 4 Aug 2010 by A. E. Finn


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hunters of Gor, John Norman, 12 Nov 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Hunters of Gor (Paperback)
Hunters of Gor in 1 sentence: Bosk of Port Kar moves to the Northern Forests, home of the Panther Girls.
Tarl Cabot (now known as Bosk of Port Kar) hears that the love of his life, Talena, has been seen, enslaved, in the Northern Forests of Gor. Home to the Panther Girls of Gor. He decides to go rescue her, and when he hears that Marlenus, Ubar of Ar, is in the forests with the same mission he is determined to be there first.
There are a couple of parties involved in this book. The Panther Girls, the men of Bosk, the men of Marlenus as well as from Sarus of Tyros. The fates of these three men are not sure, as Bosk falls captive to the Panther Girls to be saved by Marlenus, which will be captured later by Sarus.
In the books Norman wrote earlier one can read about the conflicts between Marlenus and Bosk. It is a complicated relationship, which we on earth would call a father and son relationship. One could say at one time they're friends, and then enemies again, which is very interesting to read.
Both Marlenus and Bosk will be victors in the Northern Forest, though Bosk loses the last of his illusions regarding his great love Talena.
It is also nice to read that the love between Marlenus, Ubar of Ar and Verna of the Panther Girls approaches a love between equals. It is a nice addition to the character of the most powerful Gorean Warrior.
All and all in my opinion the book is a good follow up to Captive of Gor. John Norman may not be the best writer there is on the world, his books peek many people active in the Gorean "Lifestyle" and with this books Norman paints a better picture of the fierce and brave Panther Girls of the North.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Warrior returns to restore lost honour in battle for love, 26 Feb 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Hunters of Gor (The Gor series) (Paperback)
After being paralised in armed combat Tarl Cabot of Ko-ro-ba returns to his new life as a Captain in Port Kar to brood on his lost love and the loss of his honour that he can never regain on any battle field.He is then brought news of a slave that he loved and released being taken by one of the beasts known as Kur, the fury that rises in his blood defeats the paralisis and he then sets out on a quest to re-enslave his love and defeat the Kur. But to succeed he must first overcome the female warriors of the forest and he may be able to recolect the honour that he once had even if he can never regain and keep that honour.A thrilling eigth volume in the cronicles of Gor. So why not re-enter the world of Tarl Cabot and the planet of Gor.Sit back, open the cover and enjoy.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Pointless, 4 Aug 2010
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A. E. Finn (Reading) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I like the Gor books because when he gets it right, they are good sword and fantasy novels. When he gets them wrong though!
The style of the writing is pompous repeatative statements. The narrator repeats the same phrase over and over again. Norman becomes obsessed with slavery and chains. Every single scene goes into minute details of how the slave girls are chained. I just got bored after the three hundreth time he used the word coffle.
The story is of Bosk of Port Kar going North to the great forests of Gor to find his lost love, Talena. Bosk was an Earthman, then a warrior, then a merchant and finally a seaman. He enters the Forests and lo, he is instantly better at tracking and surviving than the Panther Girls who have lived there all their lives. He kills dozens of enemies with his longbow and they never once think to stop and hunt him down. He chases the bad guys silently through the forest, but wait! He also has twenty to forty chained female slave blundering along too. He has to feed them, water them, chain them and still has time to keep up with the enemy. This episode by the way is almost a rewriting of a very similar scene in Raiders of Gor where Bosk hunts down and kills dozens of enemies silently and no one ever catches him.
It is filler of the worst kind
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Tarl Cabot tracks down three important women in his life, 13 Jan 2003
By A Customer
The good news is that Tarl Cabot returns to the forefront in "Hunters of Gor," the 8th volume in the Chronicles of Counter-Earth. However, the bad news is that instead of returning to the issue of the coming war between the Priest-Kings and the Others, author John Norman continues to explore his Gorean philosophy. It occurs to me that this means "Hunters of Gor" is a fitting follow up to "Captives of Gor," but I was never impressed by that volume in the first place. The arguments about the natural state of relations between men and women, on Gor at least, is developed within the context of Tarl Cabot's relationships with three women: Talena, the daughter of Marlenus of Ar, and who Cabot had abducted as a tarnsman in his first adventure on Gor; Vella of Gor, nee Elizabeth Cardwell, who had been a major player in Cabot's two greatest adventures in "Nomads of Gor" and "Assassin of Gor"; and Verna, the chieftess of the untamed panther women who roam the Northern forests. If you stop and think about it Norman has developed three distinct female types that he then explores in this story: Talena was raised as a Free Woman of Gor, Vella is a modern Earth woman turned into a Gorean pleasure slave, and Verna has never been tamed. Of course Tarl Cabot is the common denominator since he is the strong master who tamed all three women. In "Hunters of Gor" we follow Tarl Cabot's adventures in the north as he learns what has happened to these three women. But it seems to be that this is more a journey of self-discovery for our hero and that there are subtle distinctions to the repetitive scenes acted out with these three women. The only problem is that I visit Gor for the action and adventure rather than to have a pleasure slave chained to my bed. "Hunters of Gor" is a slight improvement over the previous volume, but still a disappointment compared to the great adventure story Norman had developed over the first half-dozen volumes.
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