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5.0 out of 5 stars "His face had puffed up and turned black with rot and . . .The smell of him would make animals run away."
A vital young woman is thoroughly enjoying the pastorally bright summer day when a man, obviously in distress, staggers in front of her. Alarmed, she rushes to the man's aid only to be attacked, and seriously bitten by him. In shock, she flees into a nearby trendy oxygen bar. She hooks herself up, and dies. Then she comes back, the oxygen has kept her brain alive, but...
Published on 7 Jan 2011 by Mark Louis Baumgart

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best zombie book ever, but enjoyable.
OK, so I guess you've read Monster Island and decided to read the sequel - or prequel in this case - to David Wellingtons first zombie novel. Though new readers to this series please note that this book is more than suitable to read as the first in the series before moving on to Monster Island.

Maybe I am in the minority of people out there reading zombie...
Published on 11 Nov 2007 by Mr. R. Coleman


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best zombie book ever, but enjoyable., 11 Nov 2007
By 
Mr. R. Coleman (Marlow, UK) - See all my reviews
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OK, so I guess you've read Monster Island and decided to read the sequel - or prequel in this case - to David Wellingtons first zombie novel. Though new readers to this series please note that this book is more than suitable to read as the first in the series before moving on to Monster Island.

Maybe I am in the minority of people out there reading zombie novels, but when I started hunting Amazon for zombie novels I bought a whole host of them by various authors in the hope of some good old zombie nosh entertainment. But what I find is that the books I bought all seem to have either thinking zombies, talking zombies, zombies with rocket launchers, animal zombies and now in this book INVISIBLE zombies. What happened to good old Romeo 'Dawn of the Dead' zombies ? Maybe I am stuck in the past and that Zombies have evolved in the last 20-30 years !

Don't get me wrong the book is entertaining, but what sticks out in my mind after reading the book is not so much what I enjoyed about it, but what I did not like about it - or found confusing. I hated the thought of Invisible zombies and I was confused by there seeming to be two different reasons for the dead coming back to life - Mael's God and the mad scientist Vronski working to save his wife Charlotte. And the introduction of psychics seemed to push what could have been a great book a little further over the top.

Wellington does do a great job in telling the fall of humanity to the undead hordes from start to finish in the book, and that to me is what saves this book. From the first sporadic outburst of the dead returning to life through to the eventual full on zombie apocalypse. The military jargon is easily understandable, and the little notes make fun reading at times.

The book is split once again - like Monster Island - into following a few characters through the outbreak. Bannerman Clark - the military official, Nilla the thinking and invisible zombie, and Dick - well, lets just say he's pretty `armless.

If you enjoyed the first book, your pretty much guaranteed to enjoy the second. But to those people saying this is the best zombie book ever, well I'll have to disagree with you on that. I'll give it 3 stars.

I have already bought Monster Planet to finish the trilogy, and I just hope that Wellington can tie up any loose ends in the final book - though to be honest I think he is going to probably give me more things to be puzzled about !
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as the first but still worth a buy, 25 Sep 2012
By 
N. rees (merthyr tydfil, m glam Great Britain) - See all my reviews
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I won't bother explaining the plot as others have done that better then i ever could. I bought this in book form and then re-bought it on the kindle.Wellingtons zombie book has what others lack, originality
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1.0 out of 5 stars Invisible Zombies....????, 27 Dec 2011
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This review is from: Monster Nation (Paperback)
So poor I used most of the copy from my Monster Island review just so I could give this a review.

I know zombie lit involves suspension of belief, however this really involves suspension of your brain in formaldehyde.

Most of the 1 star reviews have covered the story (and it's flaws) in more than enough detail, but suffice to say, I read all three in the trilogy (Island somehow was actually the best of the bunch if such a thing is possible), as it gets more and more 'out there' with each installment.

Doesn't follow a traditional Zombie route, which would be fine if it didn't end up becoming a form of supernatural fantasy (which isn't why I bought the book)

Reads like the bloke and some of his mates sat around a camp fire drinking beer and smoking something, with each of them having to add the next line to the story in turn, as it gets more and more whacky.

Wanted to enjoy this (I really did) as it was a mighty tome with ZOMBIES(as are the other two) but sadly it was just 'pants'.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "His face had puffed up and turned black with rot and . . .The smell of him would make animals run away.", 7 Jan 2011
This review is from: Monster Nation (Paperback)
A vital young woman is thoroughly enjoying the pastorally bright summer day when a man, obviously in distress, staggers in front of her. Alarmed, she rushes to the man's aid only to be attacked, and seriously bitten by him. In shock, she flees into a nearby trendy oxygen bar. She hooks herself up, and dies. Then she comes back, the oxygen has kept her brain alive, but she has lost her memory. Not remembering her name, she adopts the name Nilla, which she takes from a bag of snacks she finds after she awakes.

This is still the beginning of the zombie plague, so, just as she comes back, she is discovered by a couple of police officers who think that she is wounded, but still alive. She is then transported to a hospital were she will witness the beginning of the end of the world.

Meanwhile Dick, an inspector from NIH, is hiking up a mountainside of the Rocky Mountain National Park to investigate a complaint of either mad cow or scrape amongst a flock sheep. What he finds is far, far worse.

Wellington tells his story from three viewpoints, the third being Captain Bannerman Clark of the Colorado Army National Guard. Clark is enjoying some downtime in his favorite restaurant when he gets an emergency call. It seems that there is a riot happening at the ADX-Supermax prison in Florence. Again, it will be far, far worse than what he's expecting.

Wellington will bounce the audience from one situation to another using these three viewpoints, and these character's stories will interweave with each other until all three meet up at the end. Which is alright, my IQ is higher than that of room temperature, so I can handle these multi-viewpoints.

Nilla is the main character of this novel. A sincerely likable (dead) person, she's confused as to who and what she is. All she wants to do is survive and find out what her past identity was. She quickly finds out that she has the power to be able to turn herself invisible by manipulating the dark energy that is causing the zombification. Being sentient, she's also a zombie with a conscience, who falls into bad company when she becomes manipulated by Mael Mag Och, the ancient mummy from "Monster Island" who is actively working to destroy what is left of the world. She eventually regains her independence (like Gary did in the first novel) and actively works to find her own identity and create her own destiny. Despite everything, Nilla ends up being sympathetic in her plight of her seemingly stuck between the two worlds of the living and the dead. Don't hate her just because she's living challenged.

Less likable is Bannerman Clark, a dedicated, and unimaginative, by-the-book type who just can't seem to wrap his mind around the fact that he's fighting REAL zombies, and NOT infected sick people. An attitude that keeps getting people killed.

Also of interest is Nilla's part-time travelling companion Shar, a hurt and confused runaway girl, and Sikh Major Vikran Singh Nanda, who is Clark's second-in-command. It's too bad they weren't given more page space.

In this the novel the whole "dark energy" idea, which was introduced in "Monster Island", and which must have, to some extent, influenced Brian Keenes when he created his "Rising" duology, is totally explained. While, it helps a little to have read the previous novel, this is still, like the first book in this trilogy, a stand-alone novel. This is because this novel takes place slightly before the first novel, and that none of the characters from the first novel, except Mael Mag Och, make an appearance here. Although, all of the survivors from these first two books in the trilogy will end up in the concluding volume.

However, even three character viewpoints can be a bit cramping to tell the story of the world's apocalypse. So, Wellington breaks the novel into four parts, and the parts into dozens of short one to four page chapters, each of which start of with either a dated leader paragraph or factoid which tells of the world's death from the beginning of the plague to the end of the story from dozens of viewpoints.

I wouldn't listen to those unimaginative and conservative readers who can't quite grasp the fact that zombie literature has evolved beyond the basic rotting shambler that Romero created in his first movie. This is a great apocalyptic zombie fantasy novel that shies away from most of the easily used character stereotypes, and the shocking cruelty for shock's sake, that infuses too many modern zombie novels. This novel's viewpoint can be pretty bleak, and Wellington's concentration on character development and story telling help bring the world's bleak vision into focus. Another must read road trip/quest fantasy mixed with zombie horror.

For this site I have also reviewed these other two novels in this series:

Monster Island: A Zombie Novel
Monster Planet: A Zombie Novel

For this site I have also reviewed these other zombie novels:

Night of the Living Dead TP
Zombie Moon (Harlequin Nocturne)
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3.0 out of 5 stars Author Should Write Screenplays, Not Books, 2 Jun 2009
By 
Ursula K. Raphael "AstraDaemon of The Zombiep... (USA) - See all my reviews
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I've never read anything by David Wellington before, so I have no point of reference - not sure if this is worse than Monster Island: A Zombie Novel, or better...not sure if I want to read anything else by this author, but don't get me wrong, Wellington is definitely talented. I'm thinking that this book was simply the wrong choice for me. It was something I had on my wishlist for a long time, and I finally bought it one day, thinking it was a zombie novel.

It does have zombies, but it's not a straight-up zombie story. There were a lot of supernatural elements in this book, which I like, but not necessarily all together. It's enough of a reach for me to accept the latest trend of zombies that think, etc., but a zombie that can control her aura, or zombies speaking psychically were too much.

While I'm used to apocalyptic stories with more than one point-of-view, this book switched between three POVs, and it was a little hard to follow at first. It did get easier the farther I read into the story. To be honest, though, between the "invisible" zombie effects and the constantly switching between POVs, I actually considered not finishing the book.

This brings me to the last problem I had with this book, the ending. After sticking it out, and reading all the way through, that had to be one of the worst endings ever written. Ironically, if Wellington had ended the book after Nilla walked away from everything, I wouldn't have a problem with the ending. I didn't care if I ever found out her real name, since I never found out more about Mael (not sure if I want to buy Monster Planet: A Zombie Novel just to find out)...and I was also wondering what happened to Bannerman...but cramming Nilla's arrival at the East coast in a few sentences just for her name - well, the author could have literally wrote "blah blah blah," and it wouldn't have made a difference.

This book, based on what I have read in the past, is like a cross between The Rising and Demons. However, this novel is extremely original, and Wellington should be given props for that. It was also the most detailed gore I have ever read! I might be ripping on it as a book, but I think it would make an excellent movie. I seriously think he should be writing screenplays.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not Bad, 30 Oct 2008
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Was not too bad a story, I agree with most of the others though, could have done with leaving out the magic as this brought down the story quite a bit. All in all though it made quite a nice read, along with the other 2 in the trilogy as well.
I'd say its definitely worth a read if you find yourself with some spare time.
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2.0 out of 5 stars A zombie story?, 16 Sep 2008
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I brought both Monster Island and Monster Nation and DONT plan on getting the third part.

They were an OK read if you have nothing else, these were given to my local charity shop as they had no re-read value to me.

The Zombie idea has been going for decades now and yes things need to be done to change the same old story BUT zombies that can go invisible or have telepathic powers to control other zombies or even humans is WAY to far.

I would suggest you leave this book and try David Moody and his Autum series.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Prequel to the epic zombie trilogy - but not as good as the first., 22 April 2008
By 
J. P. Baker "bakerjp" (UK) - See all my reviews
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This prequel to Monster Island has some nice touches. I particularly liked the use of newspaper articles and other bits of media to demonstrate the increasing panic and breakdown of human society as the book progresses. There is also some attempt to explain the source of what caused the zombies in the last third of the book.

I didn't like it as much as Monster Island though, as the characters didn't seem to be as interesting - most of the time they are in "what the hell is going on?" mode. Neither of the two main characters are very well fleshed out - one can't remember who she is so is a bit of a blank slate; the other is an army guy who's trying to stop the zombie outbreak, but not very successfully. I also had difficulty accepting that characters could make themselves invisible, read minds, predict the future etc (though I guess if you're able to accept that people can come back from the dead then you should really be open to everything). I guess I just like the Romero zombies.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nice Prequel, 11 Aug 2007
By 
Andy Phillips (Leicestershire, UK) - See all my reviews
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This book is a prequel to 'Monster Island' by the same author, and is written in a similar style, which isn't surprising. However, that's not a bad thing as both stories are well written and both are good stand-alone reads, with only a few minor references to 'Monster Island' within 'Monster Nation'. There are all the usual things you would expect from a zombie novel and a few unique touches to keep it interesting. There is a bit of military jargon in this book, but not enough to spoil it if you're not familiar with the terminology, and probably justified given that the main character is a member of the US National Guard. All in all, a good book for horror fans, especially if you liked 'Monster Island'.
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars zombie-tastic!, 12 Oct 2006
By 
Rachel Keig "Rakie" (isle of man) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Monster Nation (Paperback)
well, the easy thing to say is that if you loved Monster Island then you'll love Monster Nation... but let's face it, if you loved MI then you'll already have this on pre-order. In fact, you'll probably already have read it, loaned it out to your friends and are currently taking legal action to get your copy back (that might just be me tho).

so this is aimed at people who've not read MI (and let me just say, shame on you, where have you been??). Nation is a prequel but also a fantastic stand-alone read, with brilliantly realised characters and more gore than you can shake some kind of gore-seeking stick at. It's a classic zombie-tastic read - never has human suffering and the end of society as we know it been so damn entertaining. Buy it. You won't regret it.
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Monster Nation
Monster Nation by David Wellington (Paperback - 7 Sep 2006)
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