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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An incredible end to an incredible ship., 26 Nov 2004
By 
Ned Middleton (British professional underwater photo-journalist & author) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
HIJMS Yamato was - and will now forever be, the largest Battleship ever built. It will also forever remain a supreme curiosity that Japan - the one country which had the foresight to recognise how air power and aircraft carriers were the sea-going naval might of the future, should insist on building 2 Yamato class Battleships when their construction almost bankrupted the nation to the extent that their building even deprived the country's fishermen of their nets.
Nevertheless this magnificent vessel of death, doom and destruction went into service at a time when the Imperial Japanese Navy could do no wrong. Prior to WW2 Japan broke the terms of the peace treaties by preparing for their eventual complete domination of the Pacific region. The building of Truk Lagoon being one example. Then, in the aftermath of Pearl Harbour those plans were put into effect with devastating results. In June 1942, however, they failed to take Midway Atoll and from then on it was all downhill. Three years later, the largest Battleship ever to have been built was sent on a final mission from which she never returned.
In "A Glorious Way to Die" Russell Spurr gives an account of this great ship from beginning to tragic end. It is a complete account - as befits one of the world's greatest ships.
Perhaps the Yamato will prove to be the last great ship to be discovered by the great Bob Ballard.
NM.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SUPERB ACCOUNT OF YAMATO'S LAST VOYAGE, 8 Feb 1999
By A Customer
This account certainly deserves five stars, no question about it. Spurr presents an excellent and very readable account of the last sailing of the Yamato on it's suicide mission to Okinawa. The author switches back and forth between the American side and the Japanese side, and, because of this, presents two sides of the same event. And, when reading both sides, the reader gets the impression that the author has done one heck of a job of research. The American characters, and especially the Japanese characters, come alive as real people, in real situations, in real action. Spurr has done an excellent job in both research and presentation; the book is exciting and hard to put down once you start reading. I was also impressed with the clarity of maps and diagrams, which, in most books of this period, are so small and blurry they are impossible to read. A great battleship. A great story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Read, 15 Mar 2014
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This review is from: A Glorious Way to Die: The Kamikaze Mission of the Battleship Yamato (Paperback)
Good read if you are interested in the Kamikaze missions both from planes & ships, the Author makes it feel you are there, would recommend.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly good story of the end of a phenomenal battleship, 2 Aug 2013
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I was really expecting this to be a schmaltzy sentimental, ineptly written story. So it came as a very pleasant surprise to find a well constructed, documentary like narrative, made all the more readable by the human element. It isn't earth (or sea) shattering history, but it is a poignant story, very well told, with a touch of style. Highly recommended
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yamato lived, 7 Sep 2011
By 
Inquisio (East Anglia. Britain) - See all my reviews
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I had studied the World War 2 battleships, mainly British, but American as well. This led inexorably to an even greater abiding interest in submarines. Through reading many books about Uboats and their ilk, I became interested in American submarines and this, led in turn to the history of submarines lying in wait for the expected Imperial Japanese Fleet leaving the safe anchorage behind the southern island of mainland Japan, Kyushu.
In my relentless pursuit of fresh reading I stumbled on this book. It tells of the harrowing tale of the demise of the largest battleship ever built, the perceived governmental/military establishment of wartime Japan with their creed, honor and discipline. It shifts between the American forces and the aircraft carriers, the pilots, the planes, the submarines, the ships and then back to the Kamikaze pilots and bombers, and of course the battle fleet.
It is told in great detail, from eye witness sources, survivors of both sides, plus, details, seldom known about the Yamato due to it's inherent secrecy of build, usage and deployment.
I found the book very absorbing, well written and researched. Thoroughly recommended tome, even after the 1981 publishing date has long gone.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Riveting, informative, you can almost smell the cordite, 10 Aug 2001
By A Customer
A thoroughly well researched account of the little known demise of the mightiest battleship ever constructed. The IJN Yamato dissapeared into naval folklore, even as she sank little was known about her. This book recounts the final kamikaze mission of this giant and the events surrounding it from both sides. A fascinating account of life at sea, the pacific war and how the Japanese fought to the bitter end. A cracking read.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent account, 18 April 2010
This review is from: A Glorious Way to Die: The Kamikaze Mission of the Battleship Yamato (Paperback)
The is an excellent account of the last voyage of the world's largest battleship, the incredible Yamato. It's well written and presents the account from both sides of the battle, including the US submariners who almost got a chance to attack the ship and the Navy and Marine airmen who were responsible for its sinking. The author also contrasts the differing ethos of the two navies.

If you're interested in WWII naval history in the Pacific, this book is a must-read.

--Michael W. Perry, editor of Chesterton on War and Peace: Battling the Ideas and Movements that Led to Nazism and World War II
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best Yamato books that I have ever read!, 23 Mar 1999
By A Customer
I am trying to read all the books published that are written about, or contain material on, the Yamato-class "super-battleships" of the Imperial Japanese Navy. As I read this book, I felt like I was actually on the deck of the gigantic battleship as she was blown to her destruction.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Moving Account of the Final Mission of the Yamato, 4 May 1999
By A Customer
This was a very decent and well researched account of the final mission of the Japanese Battleship 'Yamato'. The story was told well and the author made good use of first hand accounts by the participants on both sides. The book shows that not all Japanese were fanatical in their desire to die for no good cause, a lot where soldiers/sailors doing their duty as they saw fit.
The author presented some very interesting accounts of young Japanese sailors and of some young American pilots. It also offered a overview of the whole suicide campaign against Allied forces off Okinawa. This was a easy book to read and I came away feeling sorry for alot of the American & Japanese servicemen who gave their lives for the country. A good read!
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You want to know about the "Yamato"....., 28 April 1998
By A Customer
Wonderful. This great book is an exciting account of the Yamato's final mission. Incredibly readable and detailed, Spurr combines some of the best traditions of naval history into a single, elegant account. This book gives the reader a good feel for what the final days of the "Yamato" were like. If you like naval history, you should enjoy "A Glorious Way to Die."
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