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66 of 66 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A stunning redaction of Jung on nature and the psyche
This book is in effect a redaction - a drawing together from multiple sources - of Jung's work on nature, the human psyche, and the challenges both face in advanced modernity and the imperative it poses of recovering spirituality. Jung's views remain cutting edge for our times, and here Sabini has drawn not just from his collected works, but also from obscure seminars and...
Published on 27 July 2009 by Alastair McIntosh

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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly lucid
This book is a collection of writings and speeches by Carl Gustav Jung, the well known and controversial Swiss psychiatrist, dealing with his views on modern civilization, technology and nature. Although the book to a large extent consists of excerpts rather than whole texts, they are nevertheless quite lucid and even interesting. And no, I don't say I agree with them. In...
Published on 18 Dec 2010 by Ashtar Command


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66 of 66 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A stunning redaction of Jung on nature and the psyche, 27 July 2009
By 
Alastair McIntosh (Scotland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Earth Has a Soul: C.G.Jung's Writings on Nature, Technology and Modern Life (Paperback)
This book is in effect a redaction - a drawing together from multiple sources - of Jung's work on nature, the human psyche, and the challenges both face in advanced modernity and the imperative it poses of recovering spirituality. Jung's views remain cutting edge for our times, and here Sabini has drawn not just from his collected works, but also from obscure seminars and letters to present material that will be both well-known and new to many Jungian scholars.

I use the expression "redaction" rather than merely "anthology" because the care with which Sabini has gathered and themed her material makes the chapters flow as if one is reading a new work by Jung. I was overwhelmed by its richness and its relevance to modern times - especially as a scholar working with colleagues who are exploring the ontology of the Celtic psyche, and in the case of some of us, relating that to the Gaelic/Celtic/Scottish communities in which we grew up. Jung's observations of primal societies in my view shed vital light on the self-understanding of what it can mean to be indigenous in the modern world, and Sabini's redaction brings all this together in ways that make a powerful contribution to ecopsychology and cultural studies.

This is clearly a work of love ... whoever Meredith Sabini is, she understands the importance of what was hidden in Jungian archives for our times ... and she has rendered it accessible in this beautifully produced volume.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly lucid, 18 Dec 2010
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This review is from: The Earth Has a Soul: C.G.Jung's Writings on Nature, Technology and Modern Life (Paperback)
This book is a collection of writings and speeches by Carl Gustav Jung, the well known and controversial Swiss psychiatrist, dealing with his views on modern civilization, technology and nature. Although the book to a large extent consists of excerpts rather than whole texts, they are nevertheless quite lucid and even interesting. And no, I don't say I agree with them. In fact, I have more or less the opposite opinions on most issues!

Previous to this book I've only read one of Jung's works, "Psychology and religion", which is more difficult to digest. "The Earth has a soul" could probably be read even by somebody completely new to Jung's ideas, although a working knowledge of his thinking obviously helps. In my opinion, Jung was a philosopher, critic of civilization and perhaps even a kind of spiritual teacher, rather than a psychoanalyst in the strict sense of that term. Many have pointed out the affinity between his ideas and those of the New Age. Some have even accused him of being a closet neo-pagan and Gnostic. To others, that's a commendation!

"The Earth has a soul" speaks for itself, but I will nevertheless mention the contents briefly.

Jung spends considerable time talking about his experiences at Mount Elgon in East Africa, where he socialized with a tribal people he calls the Elgonyi. He also mentions meetings with Pueblo Indians in the United States. Jung defends the "primitive" and "superstitious" worldview of these peoples, arguing that it's rational in its own context. Closer to home, Jung retells various episodes from his childhood showing his close (and sometimes zany) relation to nature. Our author also talks about the stone tower at Bollingen in Switzerland which he built himself and used as a kind of spiritual retreat.

It's not always clear whether Jung really believed in the existence of spirits "out there". He sometimes writes as if he did. Apparently, the spirits were present in the kitchen section at Bollingen! At other times, he says that spirits and gods are "in here", a kind of psychological phenomena who are projected onto the outside world. To Jung, this projection isn't negative. Quite the contrary: modern man, by pretending that gods and spirits don't exist, have actually made them a hidden part of his psyche, leading to all kinds of irrationalism and madness, including the madness of Nazism and the Holocaust.

Jung criticizes our disconnectedness from nature, our dependence on modern technology, the stress and consumerism of our civilization. Occasionally, he waxes apocalyptic, saying that the greatest danger to man is man himself, that an overpopulation crisis might destroy the world, etc. Jung has no collective solutions to offer, however. The solutions are strictly individual. Each individual must face his own self and experience an inner transformation. Jung feared what he considered to be authoritarian and collectivist tendencies of the modern age. The exact character of the spiritual transformation is less clear to me, but Jung does mention the ancient mystery religions as offering a kind of synthesis between the human spirit and Nature.

Since "The Earth has a soul" consists to a large extent of excerpts from longer articles, Jung sounds contradictory at times. But then, who knows, maybe he was contradictory? There seems to be a tension in his writings between individualism/anti-collectivism and communitarianism. There is also a tension between statements which sound "pro-animal" and other statements, where humans are considered to be the conscious expression of the universe. At bottom, Jung seems to regard man as a contradictory or paradoxical being, both god and devil simultaneously.

"The Earth has a soul" doesn't untie all the knots of the Jung complex, but it could be a place to start for those interested in this lone philosopher of Switzerland...
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, 25 May 2013
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This review is from: The Earth Has a Soul: C.G.Jung's Writings on Nature, Technology and Modern Life (Paperback)
Very enjoyable to have this collection of his writings on nature in one place. Very nourishing. Well worth it for anybody interested in an intuitive understanding of nature.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent book, that not only depicts parts of Jungs life, his interactions and learnings from people and in some cases from, 13 Mar 2014
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This review is from: The Earth Has a Soul: C.G.Jung's Writings on Nature, Technology and Modern Life (Paperback)
...the remotest parts of the world. It also is a valuable source as a point of reference to concepts and beliefs that Jung either learned from these people, or indeed discovered for himself when he went unto the wilderness and found solace with nature.
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6 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Earth Has a Soul; C.G. Jung's Writings on Nature, Technology, and Modern Life., 26 Sep 2011
This review is from: The Earth Has a Soul: C.G.Jung's Writings on Nature, Technology and Modern Life (Paperback)
Ordered this book on 23rd September and received it on the 26th Sept.....once again, Amazon proves itself on maintaining customer satisfaction. The book is a gem if you are interested in the thoughts and writings of Jung.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Magic, 24 Aug 2013
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Mr. D A Collie (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Earth Has a Soul: C.G.Jung's Writings on Nature, Technology and Modern Life (Paperback)
I'm satisfied with this product. It is exactly as I's imagined it. It performs the function it was bought to perform.
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