Customer Reviews


3 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why the Road to Hell is paved with Good Intentions
Hayek wrote the original 'Road to Serfdom' which appeared in 1944 and which still, today, is a salutory reminder of the fate which awaits us should we put too much faith in the state under whichever political persuasion.
This little book, a reprint of the version which appeared in the Reader's Digest, deserves five stars for a number of reasons.
Firstly for the...
Published on 25 Oct. 2002 by Junglies

versus
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Rubbish photocopied edition - complete rip-off
Upon inspecting the pictures of this edition you might be fooled, as I was, into thinking you'll receive a proper 'book'. Instead, you'll be sent an appalling collection of un-numbered pages featuring large home-printed text, interspersed with small low-res black and white images - some of which have clearly been pulled directly (doubtless illegally) off random websites...
Published 14 months ago by W. De Villiers


Most Helpful First | Newest First

12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Rubbish photocopied edition - complete rip-off, 27 Jan. 2014
By 
W. De Villiers (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Upon inspecting the pictures of this edition you might be fooled, as I was, into thinking you'll receive a proper 'book'. Instead, you'll be sent an appalling collection of un-numbered pages featuring large home-printed text, interspersed with small low-res black and white images - some of which have clearly been pulled directly (doubtless illegally) off random websites. The watermark for someone's blog is clearly visible in the corner of one of the images. I wouldn't necessarily find any of this problematic if it weren't for the fact that I paid - including postage - over £5 for this shoddy little number. This is unacceptable considering one can order legitimate new copies of myriad literary classics via amazon for a slither of that amount. This is the kind of amateur job you'd expect to encounter in a dingy fringe party's political bookshop, printed off their own internal press for free circulation; it is not fit for sale on amazon, and certainly not at this price. Complete rip-off.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why the Road to Hell is paved with Good Intentions, 25 Oct. 2002
By 
Junglies (Morrisville, NC United States) - See all my reviews
Hayek wrote the original 'Road to Serfdom' which appeared in 1944 and which still, today, is a salutory reminder of the fate which awaits us should we put too much faith in the state under whichever political persuasion.
This little book, a reprint of the version which appeared in the Reader's Digest, deserves five stars for a number of reasons.
Firstly for the central message which it contains about the dangers of the collectivist state and the concentration of powers that such a state holds unto itself. Hayek dedicated his book to the socialists of all parties by which he meant that in all political parties, and indeed in the minds of many who hold no party affiliation, there are those who hold that the only way to achive a particular end is through the power of the state. He shows however, that the state which accumulates power eventually will turn that power onto the people and in the process dehumanizes those that wield power such that any revolting activity becomes justifiable. This book contains the central tenents of his arguments which are laid out in full in the unabridged version. Hayek abhors the development of the state in modern societies seeing the entity which is the state as a sort of evil empire and cautions people to be watchful and on their guard so that they maintain a healthy suspicion of the state and act to keep it from becoming too powerful. Yet, ironically, Hayek sees the tendency for such states to flourish in the so-called free societies of England and the United States. Here in New Jersey, earlier in 2002, the city of Morristown passed an ordinance which limits the number of pets which can be held in an individual household. Clearly the state intervenes too much in our lives already.
Secondly, the original Reader's Digest version, reflecting consumer demand, published this reprint at the front of it's magazine instead of at the end which was it's normal practice as well as exceeding it's normal print run many times over.
Thirdly, the editing down of the original to the condensed size is a marvel given that none of the essential essence of the original is not lost.
Hayek was originally writing in the face of the existing totalitarian regimes which existed in a number of European countries in the early 1940's and the growing strength and power of the USSR. He cautions the free nations of the West to beware the growth of the state and to fight against it. The book has a real contemporary relevance too with the world's attention being foccussed mainly on Iraq but also increasingly on the nations of Africa. Clearly the terrible and dramatic series of events unfolding in Zimbabwe are a horrific reminder of what can happen if the state and it's servants become too powerful.
For anyone believing in freedom this is a must read book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Individual creativity vs statist stagnation, 24 Sept. 2005
By 
Peter Uys "Toypom" (Sandton) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
Even after six decades, The Road To Serfdom remains essential for understanding global economics and politics. Hayek's main point, that whatever the problem, human nature demands that government be the solution, and that this is the road to hell, remains more valid than ever. He pointed out how similar the situation was under Soviet communism and fascism in Germany and Italy.
The consensus in post-war Europe was for the welfare state and this has led to declining birth-rates, mass immigration from North Africa and the Middle East, and a tendency to exchange their ancient cultural values for the frauds of postmodernism and multiculturalism.
In this classic, Hayek discusses matters like planning and power, the fallacy of the utopian idea, planning versus the rule of law. He brilliantly explains how we are faced with two irreconcilable forms of social organization. Either choice and risk resides with the individual or he is relieved of both.
Complete economic security is inseparable from restrictions on liberty - it becomes the security of the barracks. When the striving for security becomes stronger than the love of freedom, a society is in deep, deep trouble. The way to prosperity for all is to remove the obstacles of bureaucracy in order to release the creative energy of individuals.
The government's job is not to plan for progress but to create the conditions favourable to progress. This has been proved by the awesome economic expansion under Reagan and Thatcher and by the amazing growth of the Asian Tiger economies, and most recently India as it implements sensible economic policies.
Nowhere is this more obvious than in the contrast between the phenomenal growth in formerly communist countries like Estonia or Poland against the stagnant situation in Germany and France where they never had a Thatcher.
One of the best books by one of Hayek's intellectual heirs is In Defence Of Global Capitalism by Johan Norberg. I also recommend Basic Economics by Thomas Sowell, Capitalism: The Unknown Ideal by Ayn Rand, Freedom: Alchemy For A Voluntary Society by Stephan Hoeller and The Mainspring Of Human progress by Henry Grady Weaver.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Road to Serfdom: Illustrated Edition (The Road to Serfdom - Condensed Version - Illustrated)
£8.03
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews