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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So Much Fun To Read!, 7 Feb 2014
This book was super entertaining and action packed throughout the length of the read that I actually went through it a lot quicker than I have gone through most books. The script really gives a fascinating insight into the creative process and it was really interesting for me to compare where Space Police started and how much it changed before coming Space Precinct. The whole thing was enhanced by the context of the foreword by Shane Rimmer, and the brief introduction by Jamie Anderson, which added a lot of life to it and really kept me reading even when I should have been sleeping haha Pick this one up!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Calling All Space Precinct Fans!!, 5 Feb 2014
Space Police was an original pilot that Gerry Anderson created in 1986. The pilot never sold as it was but eight years later and many changes later, Space Precinct was finally born. Space Police is very different but you can see some of the earliest ideas forming in that great mind of Gerry's as he came up with the idea of a police drama on an alien planet.

This script is fascinating to see these original concepts but also see how the pilot was geared much more toward children with tons of silly puns and names of characters. In a way this reminds me more of Anderson's Dick Spanner than Space Precinct.

Fans of Space Precinct should enjoy seeing how these ideas came together. The screenplay is an enjoyable read with all those bad puns but I was surprised at how much action was in it. I have seen the pilot a few years ago but was reminded by reading this that Gerry was the master at action and excitement. It is obvious while reading the dialog and descriptions that the pacing speeds up along with the story - great stuff.

I look forward to future products on The Lost Worlds of Gerry Anderson and the Space Police Original Screenplay is off to a great start.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars For hardcore Gerry Anderson fans only, 5 Feb 2014
First of all I have to say this is something of a specialised product, it being a screenplay for TV pilot that was never screened. But if you are a fan (as I am) of Gerry Andersons genre of production then this screenplay gives a terrific insight into one of his little known works. The forward by Shane Rimmer (who voiced Scott Tracy in Thunderbirds) and the contribution by Jamie Anderson, Gerry's son and now Director of Anderson Entertainment since his fathers death, are both short but delightful.

The screenplay itself is fun to read and is in fact it is the first I have ever read all the way through. I was amazed at the level of detail that Is incorporated into the script, almost to the point of directing the actors from the page. I have no idea if this is commonplace in screenplays but it was an eye opener for me.

The only thing that could have improved it for me is the inclusion of pictures from the production so the story could be told visually as you progress through the screenplay, after all only Anderson aficionados know what the production looked like as the DVD is only available through the fan club . As it stands a good effort but it will only be appreciated fully by a limited audience.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Space Police!, 5 Feb 2014
As a fan of the works of Gerry Anderson it's great to see some of his original scripts finally getting a release, to my knowledge this is the first time. Reading scripts like this offer aspiring writers an insight into how professional writers can flesh out a scene or a character in the use of dialogue and pros. This is essential in writing for science fiction and unfortunately very few Sci-fi scripts ever get released this way.

The script penned by Gerry Anderson and Tony Barwick is a pilot for a concept entitled Space police. It sets the scene for the colourful array of characters and the vast dystopian backdrops that would eventually evolve into the 90s live action series Space Precinct.

Without giving too much away, the story itself starts slow but gradually gains momentum as everything is established, once the plot kicks into gear and the major threat is revealed, it becomes a breakneck chase with the heroes trying to out-manoeuvre the villains. There are many plot twists and surprises along the way mixed with some light hearted humour, in the end it comes to a very satisfying conclusion.

The book also contains a brief forward and introduction by Shane Rimmer and Jamie Anderson offering a little background to the script, the production and some personal thoughts.

All in all, a fun read and a great insight. Hopefully the first of many.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's Hill St Blues in Space (but family friendly!), 5 Feb 2014
By 
Lavinia Tilley (ballarat, VIC AUSTRALIA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Warning: some spoilers
Space Police's pilot script is designed for younger viewers and cannot be critiqued as anything else but.
The writers penchant for puns mean we had the characters: tom, dick and harry. Not to mention the fizzy drink 'Fuzz' and its 'book of records'.
Tough Dialogue is toned down for the kids include 'ah, shoot' 'dirt ball', 'Go fry an egg!' and from the baddie 'Go spit in your hat' (that made me laugh!)
The baddies include V. Lann, Terry Wrist, & R. Sonist (geddit!) We later find that the names were Brogan's cute assignments to them.
Also sniker worthy is the script comment where Brogan thinks of the aliens as "They've got alien names like Czechoslovakia said backwards".
Out of time moments include use of Brogan's magnum gun, and getting a 'hard copy from the computer printer'.
In the story, Brogan's a big man on the scene as he gets briefed by the Planet's President. Amazingly, Brogan is present when the baddies commit a drive by attack on the Presidential Office. However we do find out later that V.Lan has coerced an 'inside man' to get that access. V.Lan is using him to leverage freedom for his captive colleagues.
This is where the real fun of the story starts.The Presidential monorail refuses to slow as the override has been activated and the President's right hand man Bron is uncovered being the only other one with access code. The President says, "You're in deep trouble boy". Very Southern American that!
There are some great moments of tension as the monorail (with explosives to diffuse as well) finds the baddies and police trying to thwart each other. At the end of the track awaits the cliched cliff drop! The ending, however, is one with a twist and I quite liked that unpredictability!
Overall, the script is a fast paced read in keeping with the intended pace of what was to be filmed. It's cliched, dated, and not terribly original, but seldom stories are, and it's a good read for any Gerry Anderson fan or aficionado of scripts. Cheers!
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Heady Glimpse of the Future, 2 April 2014
This review is from: Space Police: The Original Screenplay: 1 (The Lost Worlds of Gerry Anderson) (Paperback)
Gerry Anderson's Space Police is the original version of the mid-90's television show Space Precinct. The latter was an enjoyable, but preposterous, and now sadly dated show which failed to take off with the young audience who were currently enjoying the Thunderbirds revival then in full swing (as part of which I was similarly able to find a home). The script presented here was written just before the stop-motion brilliance of Dick Spanner was made and just after the enjoyable, farce of Terrahawks had finished screening, and its position between the two highlights the many successes and flaws of that period in Anderson's career and it's hard not imagine other Anderson productions when reading it, most obviously Space Precinct.

Reading about the exploits of a group of interplanetary cops headed by a gruff, cynical ex-NYPD lieutenant, also named Brogan, one is able to see the fabulous, futuristic worlds of Terrahawks and imagine some of the stop-motion of Dick Spanner; the rendering of the alien landscape where much of the pilot is set and the description of some the technology inhabiting that world conjure up some classic potential Anderson locations. On the other hand the cliched, bad-joke dialogue offers little of interest other than filing in plot points and establishing a whiff of character (as Space Precinct would also do.)

The plot is a simple affair, the Space Police battle against a gangster known as V. Lann, who has put several bombs on a runaway train, which is carrying the president of an unnamed planet towards a city called Ultraville, where he is due to give a speech detailing how he will smash the major crime syndicates currently affecting the planet. V. Lann will only stop the train when the President agrees to release his men from jail and with the ever present threat of catastrophe dangling constantly over him, only the Space Police can now save the President from an untimely end.

If you've seen the classic Thunderbirds episode Brink of Disaster you pretty much know what to expect, just add in a slightly longer running time, a few more twists and turns, and some political intrigue and you're all set. When starting to read the script I was slightly bored by the premise having already seen it done in several times before, however, it's a testament to Gerry and Tony Barwick's ability to inject life into even the most familiar of scenarios, that I found myself becoming more and more gripped by it as I went along. This I would attribute chiefly to the nail-biting actions sequences so well-thought out and described in the script; when sat and thought about many of them seem fairly ludicrous, however the tension present in almost all Anderson shows is certainly ever-present in this script and provides enormous help in bringing it to life.

On the negative side the characters in the script don't seem so well-developed and while being gripped by the set-pieces I was less concerned about the fate of the characters. To level this point out though, one has to keep in mind that the lead character was played by Century 21 veteran Shane Rimmer, and when imagining him in the lead role the reader is again given a reminder of how well this could be played out on the big screen. We are also left to contemplate what kind of aliens would populate this world as images of menacing alien gangsters, six-handed barmen, and female cops with big black eyes are regularly talked about in the script, it's enough to make any potential viewer reading this undeniably curious as to how this will appear on their TV screens.

It is here I would like to point out that I read the script just before watching the pilot (available on DVD from the Official fan club, Fanderson), and I was often left with only glimpses of how the end product would turn out in addition to confusing it with how Space Precinct eventually turned out. In the end, I have to say, I was very pleasantly surprised as to how much I enjoyed the pilot, it is a very entertaining, well made piece of work, replete with the high production values notable in all Anderson features (many of Anderson's then regular crew needing to take a lot of credit for this). The transition from script to screen made the premise come alive in ways I could only have imagined reading the script; clearly this script is only a springboard for what was still to come. As a result I would implore anyone reading this script to obtain a copy of the pilot itself, as the story outlined here is given far greater presence on screen than in text. This isn't to say the script is bad merely that it serves to introduce us to the delights we will later come to savour when watching it all played out.

The main question is will the script appeal to an audience beyond Anderson devotees? The honest answer is probably not. While it is a fabulously entertaining script in its own right, the overly familiar storyline, seeming interchangeability of characters, and daft dialogue may some put readers off. The themes of the screenplay are also well-trodden with old world values vs new, moral and ethical political conundrums, and the lengths to which police offers show go in order to keep the peace having been seen in many other television shows before and since.

As a work of Anderfiction, however, and for its target audience, it is spot on providing us with many of the usual thrills and tropes we had come to expect from Gerry's work over the years. It is certainly no masterpiece and some of the dialogue wouldn't appear out of place in Crossroads, but as a further sign of Gerry's lasting commitment to producing exciting family entertainment, which can be enjoyed by all ages and is still a big pleasure to experience even 30-odd years down the line, it is both a great tribute and well worth seeking out.
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4.0 out of 5 stars ‘They’ve got alien names like Czechoslovakia said backwards’, 15 Feb 2014
This review is from: Space Police: The Original Screenplay: 1 (The Lost Worlds of Gerry Anderson) (Paperback)
‘Space Police: The Original Screenplay’ does exactly what it says on the tin - an authentic reproduction of Gerry Anderson’s and Tony Barwick’s script for ‘Star Laws’ that incorporates a number of dialogue inserts and scene re-writes. Reading the script while watching the episode I noticed several details in the script that didn’t make it into the finished episode, including a voice-over by Lieutenant Brogan that introduces his alien colleagues to the viewers (‘They’ve got alien names like Czechoslovakia said backwards’). Straight from Gerry’s personal archive, it’s about as authentic a script as we’re ever likely to see published, and even contains a number of typos and notes reproduced from the original.

The book also includes a brief foreword from Shane Rimmer, who clearly has fond memories of the production and his time working with Gerry.

It will be very interesting to see what comes next from the Lost Worlds of Gerry Anderson. Personally, I can’t wait to see some of Gerry’s un-made projects see the light of day because, while Space Police may be an unjustly overlooked production, I’m not sure it really falls into the 'lost' category. This book encourages fans to dust off their copies of Space Police, take another look, and remind themselves of just how much creative effort Gerry had to put into producing his shows. Oh, and if you haven't seen Space Police you can buy it through Fanderson!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Space... Precinct?, 13 Feb 2014
Theres more to Gerry Anderson than sleek looking spaceships, explosions and cool marionettes. (...so cool, you wanted to be one - I wanted to be Scott Tracy from Thunderbirds!) There's the sheer genius in the writing too. Fully rounded worlds populated by all manner of characters, be they human, alien or robot. Stripping the visuals away, and presenting a complete Anderson adventure in its most basic written form, you begin to appreciate just how inventive Anderson (and in this case,Tony Barwick) was. Space Precinct started here, with the pilot, "Space Police". And its an exciting plot that delivers on many levels. Whilst its slow to start, you're soon drawn into the world these guys have created. And without exciting visuals to refer to, and only scripted stage directions and loose concept descriptions to follow, your own imagination starts to fill in the blanks, in the process creating the perfect Anderson show! Readers used to reading dramatic prose may initially struggle with the script presented here, but persevere... its worth it for the story that unfolds. I'd love to see more Lost Worlds of Gerry Anderson script books, and hope this is the first of many!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A great story., 8 Feb 2014
I love Gerry Anderson and Space Precinct was my favorite at the time. This is the screenplay for Space Police, a pilot that was never taken up but retains a lot of the elements that eventually made up Space Precinct. I wasn't sure that a screenplay would be enjoyable but it really was entertaining and I would recommend this to any fans of the genre. I'm going to go and search out more Gerry Anderson screenplays.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it. Great read, 8 Feb 2014
This is the first screenplay I've bought and read and it was fascinating.I love Gerry Anderson's work and thought this would be a good place to start, I wasn't disappointed. I really enjoyed the story and the notes and amendments were well structured and added to the experience. It's made me want to read more Gerry Anderson screenplays. Highly recommended
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