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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dear Enemy
I stumbled across this title whilst browsing through the Amazon websiteand memories of this wonderful book came flooding back. I read this bookas a teenager, over and over and over again until it fell apart and Ihaven't seen it since. It is a delightful story told in letters aboutSally McBride, a frivolous young society girl. Sally is given the oneroustask of taking...
Published on 26 April 2004 by Amazon Customer

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3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Read Until I Came Across Orphans Who Were "Deaf" and "Epileptic" Being Described as "Defectives
I enjoyed this sequel to Daddy-Long-Legs but a major hindrance to my enjoyment were some of the prejudices against members of society that were so callously shared by the writer within the pages of this book. In the persona of Sallie McBride who was Judy's friend in Daddy-Long-Legs we are privy to letters written from Sallie to Judy as she serves in the role of...
Published 7 months ago by Judge Tabor


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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dear Enemy, 26 April 2004
This review is from: Dear Enemy (Hardcover)
I stumbled across this title whilst browsing through the Amazon websiteand memories of this wonderful book came flooding back. I read this bookas a teenager, over and over and over again until it fell apart and Ihaven't seen it since. It is a delightful story told in letters aboutSally McBride, a frivolous young society girl. Sally is given the oneroustask of taking charge of an orphan asylum in which her college friend Judywas brought up. She tackles the job with humour and determination and soonbecomes totally engrossed in the life of the asylum and its unfortunateresidents. Sally has been left a difficult legacy from the asylum'sprevious mistress and has to deal with some difficult trustees and theaustere visiting doctor who takes it upon himself to fill in the gaps inher education and preparation for the role. Sally, in turn tries toeducate the doctor about her preferred reading matter and pastimes withhilarious results. Hopefully my memory of the story has not faded too muchas I have not read the story for about twenty years. I can't wait to getmy hands on a copy again and laugh and cry through the pages as I didthen.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The sequel to Daddy -Long-Legs, 30 July 2002
By 
Kim (Dublin, Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dear Enemy (Hardcover)
"Dear Enemy" continues where Jean Webster's "Daddy-Long-Legs" finished. However, this time, the story is not directly about Judy Abbott but her college room-mate Sally McBride. As a wedding gift Judy is given the hated orphan-asylum to 'make over' and she chooses Sally to implement the changes. The story is told through letters to both Judy and the local doctor who is "as companiable as a granite tombstone!"
Although the story may seem tame to modern readers i am sure that anyone who enjoyed "Daddy-Long-Legs", and found its sunshine, will find this book a pleasure too.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A joyous book, 30 Aug. 2008
By 
Mrs. K. A. Wheatley "katywheatley" (Leicester, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Dear Enemy (Paperback)
This is the sequel to the book Daddy Long Legs in which an orphan girl in an asylum falls in love by letter with a wealthy and kind philanthropist. It is funny and romantic and beautifully old fashioned in the best way. This book although a sequel, can be read as a standalone, although infinitely more pleasure will be had from reading Daddy Long Legs first.

Here, Sallie McBride, a wealthy socialite and friend of the heroine in the first book is engaged by her to run the orphan asylum in which she grew up. As in the first book it is written entirely in letter form. As well as all the trials and tribulations of looking after 113 orphans it involves the blossoming relationship between Sallie and the Dear Enemy of the title, a dour, Scots doctor with very strong ideas of his own about how orphans should be raised.

This is wonderfully old fashioned, charming and utterly romantic and I read it in a day and was sad it was over.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Read Until I Came Across Orphans Who Were "Deaf" and "Epileptic" Being Described as "Defectives, 26 Sept. 2014
By 
Judge Tabor "(JMM)" (California) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Dear Enemy (Kindle Edition)
I enjoyed this sequel to Daddy-Long-Legs but a major hindrance to my enjoyment were some of the prejudices against members of society that were so callously shared by the writer within the pages of this book. In the persona of Sallie McBride who was Judy's friend in Daddy-Long-Legs we are privy to letters written from Sallie to Judy as she serves in the role of superintendent of the John Grier Home Foundation which is an orphanage for children and where Judy was raised before she left to go to college. Presently, Judy's rescuer and husband, Jervis Pendleton is the President and there are big plans to make substantial changes in every area of how the orphanage is operated. With Sallie at the helm, the taciturn and mysterious Scottish Dr. Robin McRae to provide medical care and staff which seem to come and go, we are encouraged to believe the lives of the orphans will be changed for the better within a few months. In fact, we are fascinated by the amazing gift Sallie has to take advantage of what is available to her locally and wherever she can find resources to better the lives of her 100 plus babies.

The title of the book "Dear Enemy" refers to Sallie's correspondence to the good old doc for they seem to have a kind of love/hate relationship, although it's never really love and certainly not hate. Mostly they get along very well, but there is a sadness and often a seeming coldness from the good doctor that continually puzzles Sallie. In addition to the doctor, Sallie has a love interest who comes from her same social background - Hallock, erstwhile politician and gifter of various interesting items to the orphanage when the spirit moves him.

I was reading the book, enjoying myself as we are taken back in time where automobiles were relatively new, running water was just beginning to be piped into homes, the rich had it good, but the poor folks struggling fiercely, especially sweet, helpless children who had nobody to turn to when they were left without family. As I was reading, I took a huge stumble when I came across the following words in Sallie's letter relating to her thoughts on feeble-minded children:

"Society ought to segregate them on feeble-minded farms where they can earn their livings in peaceful menial pursuits and not have children. Then in a generation or so, we might be able to wipe them out."

Then, her thoughts regarding orphan Loretta Harris and the difficulties she was having teaching her basic ideas: "I have been trying for a month or two to introduce one or two basic ideas into that child's brain, and now I know what the trouble is; her head is filled with a sort of soft cheesy substance instead of brain.

But the killer for me was the following:

In yet another letter, Sallie relates that five other children - one deaf, one an epileptic, three approaching idiocy - have been sent to their proper institutions and that none of those five should ever have been sent to the John Grier Foundation because it is an educational institution and further, "we can't waste our valuable plant in caring for defectives."

I realize this book was published in 1915 when people had vastly different ideas regarding genetics and other factors than what currently abounds. Being the grandmother of three children who have been diagnosed on the Autistic Spectrum, I hadn't forgotten how people viewed children such as my lovelies a few decades ago, but it is still difficult to read in a book I was finding so entertaining. So... overall, a very entertaining read if one can get past the comments on "defectives" which I was unable to do.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good story, 29 Jun. 2014
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This review is from: Dear Enemy (Kindle Edition)
I chose a rating of four because I felt it was a nice I treating uplifting story. One I will recommend to my granddaughter. It has a strong moral theme and a nice quaint ending. It was a shame just didn't write more or she was not talked about whilst she was staying near the asylum.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it, 1 May 2014
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This review is from: Dear Enemy (Kindle Edition)
After reading daddy long legs sand enjoying the way it's written I found the sequel and loved that too. I wish all orphans were so lucky
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4.0 out of 5 stars A great follow on from daddy Long Legs, 26 April 2014
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One ideally needs to read Daddy Long Legs before Dear Enemy to gain a better understanding. Like Daddy Long Legs, this is beautifully written & a most enjoyable read
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5.0 out of 5 stars Favourite book, 8 Feb. 2014
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This review is from: Dear Enemy (Kindle Edition)
I have the hard copies if both Jean Webster books I can read these over and over again, I constantly retread them and bought the kindle version so I could read it on my travels.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Another gem, 6 Feb. 2014
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For everyone who enjoyed Daddy Long Legs and wanted to know what happened next. Another heartwarming story of coming of age and learning the ways of human behaviour.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good read, 25 Jan. 2014
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Enjoyed the book but not as her previous book Daddylong legs . A n excellent book to pick up for short reads
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Dear Enemy
Dear Enemy by Jean Webster (Paperback - 2 May 2013)
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