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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars lovely story
I read these books as a child and still enjoyed them as an adult. A lot of spelling errors that I never noticed in the books so as to whether this was an error when turning it into a kindle book I don't know but it does not detract from a well loved classic.
Published on 20 Mar 2011 by corrinne

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great books - kindle version needs work
These are superb books but let down by some poor transcription - especially of long dashes being turned into hyphens, which creates some really weird effects and is very hard to read.
Published on 20 May 2012 by Mr. C. Shevlin


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars lovely story, 20 Mar 2011
I read these books as a child and still enjoyed them as an adult. A lot of spelling errors that I never noticed in the books so as to whether this was an error when turning it into a kindle book I don't know but it does not detract from a well loved classic.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A mammoth read, 4 Oct 2011
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Had only ever just read Little women so was keen to read the whole series of this family saga. Read all four books in a few days. Loved it. Bargain price. Worth more.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars little women, 7 Dec 2011
this took me back to my childhood and i really enjoyed reading it all, i didnt have little men or jo's boys so it was really nice to follow on
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Delightful and much-loved series, 3 July 2014
By 
Aletheuon (Wales UK) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
Originally published in the US two parts in 1868 and 1869, 'Little Women'(and its sequels) follows the lives of four sisters--Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy March. It is a fictionalised version of the lives of Louisa Alcott and her three sisters. The author had a hard struggle in life, for her father was an impractical idealist who could not support his family and she had to work from early on in her life. She was an abolitionist and feminist who never married, although she had a romance with a Polish man who is thought to have been the model for Laurie, the boy next door.
In certain ways, the book was innovative and even revolutionary in its time, intertwining the themes of domesticity, love and work and showing that all of them are necessary for a girl to find her true identity. Women then led very restricted lives. It has been said that Louisa May Alcott created the idea of the 'all-American girl'. The title refers to the fact that these March sisters were no longer children and not yet fully women; they were 'little women.'
There is a beautiful and wholesome morality in these stories, where virtue is more important than wealth and creativity more important than success, yet both reasonable wealth and success are shown as desirable for a secure and contented life. It is about God and goodness and self-sacrifice - all pretty un-PC today. Obviously, it is a period piece - it was published in the nineteenth century - but much of its charm is the period setting. It is sentimental. Americans are not afraid of sentimentality; it is we Brits we are too cynical and world-weary to enjoy it. There may be an element of wishful thinking in it, but its central characters are certainly not without flaws and they have to learn to cope in a world which is difficult for a woman to negotiate. On the whole, they do it well and they retain their integrity.
'Little Women' was a tremendous success when it was published and it has been successful ever since, beloved by generations of women and a few men, too. I first read it about sixty years ago and I still love it. Then, it gave me something my own upbringing did not give me - a sense of the importance of family and love and working together and of the lasting values of life and religion. Now, it reminds me not to get too cynical, because those old values have not changed.

'Good Wives' was written in 1869, a year after 'Little Women' but it is actually set three years after the events of the first book. To me, it doesn't quite have the impact of 'Little Women' but it is still a charming picture of life and love during nineteenth century America. The sisters have matured and are ready to marry, each learning lessons which will enable them to be themselves despite the restrictions of expectations of women at that time.
Meg (based on Louisa Alcott's sister Anna) marries and becomes a wife and a mother, learning to do her duty and endure the difficulties of poverty, She has reason to be glad that her relationship with her husband is mature and kind, very different from that of her friend Sally Moffat.
Beth (based on another of Alcott's sisters, Elizabeth) has been weak since a bout of illness during her childhood and the outcome of her story is a tearjerker. She is (to me) the most irritating sister, being incredibly passive and good, but the love she shares with her family is very clear.
Amy (not very likeable and based on another sister, Abigail) has grown up during her European journey and she learns to love and make sacrifices. She reminds me of a young relative of mine - pretty, shrewd, manipulative and in need of a good thump and a few lessons about consideration for others!
Jo is, of course, based on Alcott herself. Strong, resourceful and outspoken, she wants more from life than a conventional marriage and a safe life. Modern girls (and probably most nineteenth century ones, too) could relate to her more easily than the others, because of her strong desire for freedom and to earn her own living. She goes to New York, but she can only be a matron and not a teacher. Professor Bhaer always seemed to me much too old for her, and since Alcott herself remained single, I wonder whether she really understood what she was condemning Jo to, when she put her with a considerably older man. A pity Jo turned up her nose at Laurie, I have always thought!
Nevertheless, this charming story is rather beautiful and inspiring. Louisa M Alcott's family were not conventional Church members. They were transcendentalists who believed that organised religion weakened people and that every person should have a strong and private faith. Only when they had become strong individualists could they integrate well into society as a whole. The real-life Alcott sisters had to work hard from their early years to help support their family which, I suppose, taught them self-reliant individualism, too.
There is a review of this book in good reads (Amazon don't like plugs so I've not given this website any capital letters) by Komal which is a hilarious send-up of the book. Suffice to say, he or she does not like it! I do, though.

'Little Men'. published in 1871, tells the story of Jo Bhaer and the children at Plumfield Estate School. It is said to have been inspired by the death of Alcott's brother-in-law and in one of the last chapters a beloved character from Little Women dies.
Jo inherited Plumfield estate from her aunt March at the end of Little Women and now runs a school there with her husband, Professor Bhaer. This book describes six months at the school. Nat Blake arrives at the school, shy, orphaned and accustomed to earning a living playing his violin. We see the rest of the school through his eyes. There are only ten boys at the school until Nat, and later Dan, join them. The only girls are Daisy and Nan, not really pupils, and Jo's young sons, Rob and Teddy are present but not old enough to be pupils.
Nat learns that this is an unusual school, with each child having his own garden and pets, and they learn to run their own businesses, too. Fun is encouraged and each child is an individual whose character needs wise and kindly guidance.
Daisy is Meg's domestic, doll-loving daughter, while Nan is a girl after Jo's heart - a wild tomboy. Dan is the wild-child, leading his schoolmates into drinking, fights, etc. Of course, he redeems himself eventually.
This is another lovely story, laying down principles of child-guidance while lovingly displaying the vulnerabilities and strengths of the leading characters and the lessons they learn. It has the same moral and religious foundation as the other books, focusing on sturdy individuality, enterprise and personal growth as the basis of relationships and of society - the American Dream, in fact. I loved its idealism and its lack of fear of sentiment and became completely involved with its characters, when I first read it many years ago.

'Jo's Boys' was published in 1886. Jo's children, now grown up, experience the troubles of adult life, some of them terrible and tragic ones.
The Plumfield boys, introduced in Little Men, are the central characters, especially Tommy, Nat and Dan, Emil and Demi, together with Jo's sons Rob and Teddy. The action takes place ten years after Little Men. The book deals with the petty temptations of adolescence and adult life and how the characters learn to live honourably and well. Professor Bhaer's nephew Emil is now a sailor who is shipwrecked on his first voyage and whose character shines forth as a result of his misadventures. Dan seeks his fortune in the West, gets into trouble, falls in love inappropriately and has many difficulties and a tragedy before he gains the reputation of a hero. Nat goes to Europe as a musician.
Alcott was quite radical and feminist for her time and her ideas on strong drink, education, votes for women and the treatment and rehabilitation of criminals are all demonstrated within the life of Plumfield. It is still clear that Jo is Alcott's alter-ego, as she struggles with the problems of being a well-known writer. By the time she wrote this book, two of her sisters had died and it is possible that writing fiction was her retreat into an idealised version of her own life. It is tempting to speculate on whether Professor Bhaer was her ideal man!
Like the others in the series, this book is charming and sentimental - and I loved that about them. They are a real antidote to the cynicism and disillusion of modern life and a reminder that eternal and important values underlie our often self-centred lives. If you don't like sentiment - avoid these books!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great books - kindle version needs work, 20 May 2012
By 
Mr. C. Shevlin "chris50545" (London UK) - See all my reviews
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These are superb books but let down by some poor transcription - especially of long dashes being turned into hyphens, which creates some really weird effects and is very hard to read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Complete Little Women Series, 13 Mar 2012
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I was enchanted when I read these books as a youngster. Re-reading them again was wonderfully refreshing. A magnificent authoress.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars reliving my childhood, 8 Jun 2014
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I always loved these so it is good to revisit them it feels like coming home. Full of goodness and nice things.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Complete Little Women Series for Kindle., 6 May 2011
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I remember reading 'Little Men' about 40 years ago and thinking - 'I really enjoyed that'.
I'd never read the other 3 books in the series, but I'm 3/4 of the way through now and although it's a bit dated, it's interesting to see how the family got to the 'Little Men' stage.
It's amazing that the book was first published in 1871 and it hasn't lost any of it's original charm.
Truly a classic series and even better as it's for the Kindle.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Read them,tick them off your list and don't bother again!, 5 Jun 2014
I though I would like a trip down memory lane by re-reading these old classics,but no,boring and very badly written,didn't get past the first book!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Love , love, love, 3 May 2014
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If you hadn't noticed, I loved this series of books. The characters are wonderful and the whole story just gets under your skin and you feel that you know the family and go through the trials and tribulations with them. One of those stories that you want to find out how it finishes and then sad because the story is over.
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Little Women Series
Little Women Series by Louisa May Alcott (Paperback - 5 Aug 2012)
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