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4.4 out of 5 stars96
4.4 out of 5 stars
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on 6 August 2014
When I found this book on my kindle app I couldn't remember where it came from, perhaps it had been a special offer or free with another purchase? Anyway, having not read the blurb or any reviews I was pretty clueless as to what kind of book it was. As I read on I couldn't decide whether it was going to turn out to be about robots, or aliens, or psychic powers or simply a love story. As I got past halfway I still wasn't sure what direction it was going in and I think that made me like the book even more. By the end I was completely gripped and wandering round London bumping into people while trying to find out how it ended (I was supposed to be on a family trip).
I'm really glad I bought this book (found it? won it?) and I think I have decided it is a standalone sci-fi drama. Whatever it is, it's good and it will stick with you for a long time. In almost a scary way...maybe there's a bit of horror in there too.
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on 4 March 2014
Andreas Eschbach allows his sense of wonder to range far and wide. The author takes a very believable robotics theory and develops it over the lifetimes of his two central characters. His story begins with two children from very different backgrounds who come together by their own machinations but these two have talents that are not given to ordinary people. Hirohito the boy, has a vision that if realised will free mankind from all toil. Charlotte, his companion is able to view the past by just touching relics. Their lives are loosely intertwined and their stories, whilst they are developed separately, have relevance to each other.

Perhaps my only criticism is that there is sufficient material for the author to have written two books.One as a sequel to the other. I look forward to reading more from this author.
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on 11 February 2014
Totally brilliant book that is a great story, a great explanation of nanotechnology and a philosophical masterpiece - awesome and memorable book
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on 13 March 2014
An enthralling read that is strong both in characterisation and plot. The author's scientific background shows clearly - he knows his stuff. Actually, the only reason I gave four stars and not five was that he got a little carried away sometimes with his technical explanations. But I still recommend this book very highly. The premise is a fascinating one, with some unexpected and clever turns. Some reviewers disliked the ending but I thought it was just right.(no spoilers here, you'll have to read it yourself!) This would make a fantastic film... if anyone's got the budget. Great human storied, great themes, and a few 'what if?' questions that get stuck in your head like a swarm of nano bots.
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on 17 December 2014
This has to be one of the best science fiction stories I have ever read - and I've read a great many! The plot is fantastic (as it should be for sci-fi) but also believable and very frightening. The science is as accurate as it can be and for once the software programming is realistic. The author has obviously done his homework in all things Japanese, too. A word of praise also for the translator who appears to have produced a work where the grammar, punctuation and spelling are faultless - a refreshing change these days. In case you haven't guessed it by now, I loved this book!
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TOP 100 REVIEWERon 20 October 2015
This is definitely a book of two halves. It starts off really well. We are introduced to the two main characters as young children, and the way that their two incredibly different worlds are brought together is very cleverly crafted. The translator who transcribed this from German has done an amazing job, you would never realise when reading that this was written in a foreign language. The suspense around Hiroshi's idea and Charlotte's gift is very well done, and you just have to keep reading to find out what his idea will be, and what she is going to discover using her power.

SOME SPOILERS

But then everything seems to go completely crazy. That "crazy" there really needs a powerful expletive in front of it, but this would never get past the censors if I included it. The story just goes haywire, and it seemed to me as though the book from this point on (and if you have read the book, it is very obvious which point I am on about) was written by an entirely different person. All the subtle plot lines from the first half are just tossed aside and barely referred to again, especially Charlotte's power to discern the history of objects just from touching them. It is merely referred to again in passing at the end, as a very unconvincing attempt to explain where Hiroshi's instant and miraculous understanding of the nanites and his ability to communicate with them and control them came from. I really thought that the explanation was going to be that someone had stolen Hiroshi's ideas and taken them to the next level, so that he was dealing with what was effectively his own invention. That would have been a good espionage/thriller take on things, rather than what we ended up with, which I thought was all rather limp.

A nice idea, but overall the end result is a bit unsatisfactory.
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on 15 March 2014
I have just read some of the reviews of this book and I can't see why people are so enthusiastic. I am only 20% into it but it seems dreadfully tedious. I suppose if I could persist with it it may get better but , well, life's too short! Perhaps someone can convince me
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on 30 March 2015
Dreadful stuff ... an attempt at multiple interlinking storylines which does not work at all. Most of the early phases are plot threads which go ... nowhere whatsoever. Very slowly. Also commits the cardinal sin for science fiction of having no original ideas. Persevered until the end but really should not have. Of course reading the translation, so you have to make allowances. But still, did not work for me at all.

Have started on "The Carpet Makers" though, that seems much better so far
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on 4 December 2014
Thoroughly enjoyed this read. Quite a lengthy tome. Characters are well developed and the relationship between Hiroshima and Charlotte is pivotal. The technology is believable to a point and some leeway is needed towards the end but all in all absolutely recommended.
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on 21 February 2014
What a book! Though it is 'proper' SF, "Lord of All Things" includes strong elements of a thriller, a romance and even a light sprinkling of horror and fantasy.

The grand scope also applies to the story itself with goes from a child's dream to earth-shattering events; the scenery covers Japan, New England, the Russian Arctic, the American West, Argentina and even outer space while (the body of) the book covers about 40 years.

The German author (the translation is very good btw) handles the characters, the story arc and all other elements very well, he has most obviously done his research and the book is a joy to read.

I deducted (half a) star because the villains are a bit wooden and the whole story is somewhat predictable - but that's being picky and actively looking for a weakness. You may as well call the predictability 'logical development'.

This was my first novel by Andreas Eschbach, but definitely not my last.
Highly recommended (4 1/2 stars).
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