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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The devil may hath power
to assume a pleasing shape according to Hamlet but only on Discworld could the devil or any demon assume the shape of Rincewind. But that is exactly what Terry Pratchett calls up in "Eric", Pratchett's Discworld homage to Faust.
Eric, the protagonist, is a teenaged `demonologist' from Pseuodopolis. Eric is also a spoiled brat according to Eric's parrot. Eric is first...
Published on 15 Sep 2005 by Leonard Fleisig

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Okay, not up to standard.
I got this as a birthday present, apparently after much dithering over exactly which Discworld book to get (Many fans of Sci-Fi/Fantasy, get this with relatives, believe me!). I thought this would make a short, preferably interesting fill-in before 'Reaper Man', unfortunately this was not what I got. Although 'Eric' does have it's good points, the concept of the...
Published on 28 Aug 2000


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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The devil may hath power, 15 Sep 2005
By 
Leonard Fleisig "Len" (Virginia Beach, Virginia) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
to assume a pleasing shape according to Hamlet but only on Discworld could the devil or any demon assume the shape of Rincewind. But that is exactly what Terry Pratchett calls up in "Eric", Pratchett's Discworld homage to Faust.
Eric, the protagonist, is a teenaged `demonologist' from Pseuodopolis. Eric is also a spoiled brat according to Eric's parrot. Eric is first seen trying to summon a demon in order to have the demon grant Eric's wish for power, women, and eternal life. Instead, through a series of Discworldian circumstances Eric calls up Rincewind, last seen locked in the Dungeon Dimensions (Sourcery).
What follows is a Discworld version of a Hope and Crosby Road movie that parallels Faust. Eric and Rincewind travel to the ends of time (actually the beginning of time among other places) and Rincewind faces adversity and the threat of death in his own inimitable fashion (feet don't fail me now).
There are some great set pieces in Eric. DEATH makes two brief, but very funny appearances. First, when the Wizards determine something strange is going on they summon DEATH and demand answer. Of course, they realize quickly that perhaps they should speak to him in the same manner that people in Ankh Morpork speak to the Patrician. Later in the book, DEATH patiently awaits the moment for life to begin is priceless Pratchett fashion. Having the universe start with a paper clip and not a big bang was a very appealing concept.
Similarly hilarious is Rincewind's trip to the new and improved version of hell. Physical torture has been replaced by endless viewings of someone else's holiday slides, elevator music, and the recitation of thousands of pages of regulations only a hellish bureaucrat could construct. Interestingly, Rincewind's conversation with a creator of universes who takes special pride in the creation of trees had a nice resemblance to Slartibartfast from Douglas Adams Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy who award for creating the jigsaw like coastline of the fjords of Norway.
Despite these typically brilliant bits Eric lacked some of the cohesion found in most of the other Discworld books I have read. Apparently, Eric was originally published as a graphic novel and the illustrations went a long way towards fleshing out the story line. In a sense this version seems to be akin to reading a comic (a very good comic book) without the comic art. There does seem to be something a bit lacking.
However, even if Eric is not Pratchett's finest Discworld book it is still very much worth reading. There is an old cliché that a bad day of fishing is better than the best day of work. In this instance I think it fair to say that a good but the best Discworld book is better than the best that many other authors can put out. I recommend this book to any Discworld fan. I would not recommend this to anyone new to Discworld. Eric works best once one has got to know a bit about Discworld generally and Rincewind specifically.
Eric, despite any flaws, is still very much worth reading.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars brilliant!, 7 Oct 2006
Eric is a hilarious novel by Terry Pratchett. It begins in Ankh- Morpork, where the University wizards are performing the Rite of AshKente, which summons Death, when they find out that Rincewind, a cowardly wizard ,is stuck in the Dungeon Dimensions, due to the events of Sourcery. As he was there, he was summoned as a demon by Eric, a demonologist, and his parrot, who has a limited vocabulary, so keeps saying " wossname". He must grant Eric 3 wishes. So Eric, parrot and Rincewind (and his Luggage ,a fearsome walking chest, who attacks enemies of its owner), set off on a journey through time which includes such horrors as wheels being used as headgear, cleaners being bribed, and small rat faced men with sandwiches. I loved this book, and you will want to read it again and again.
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What? This is excellent!, 2 April 2001
It has really really shocked me that so many reviewers don't appreciate this book! 'Too short', 'too childish' you say. Sorry!? Maybe the humorous parodying of the Trojan war was lost on you or the parodying of creation, in fact this book is a fine example of brilliant parodying by a very clever author. In my opinion this ranks easily alongside some of Pratchett's best. It's a nice easy to read short story, with the excellent sardonic wit of Rincewind shining through once again. This is a book i will read again and again when I want a good laugh. Keep going Terry......
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Laugh-out-loud funny!, 10 Jun 2005
By 
Kurt A. Johnson (Marseilles, IL USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Eric (Mass Market Paperback)
This is the ninth book in Terry Pratchett's series on the Discworld - a flat world, supported on the backs of four massive elephants riding on the back of a planet-sized turtle. Anything hilarious can happen here, and eventually does.
This book picks up after Sourcery, with poor Rincewind trapped in the Dungeon Dimensions. But, when he is inadvertently summoned by a teenage demonologist in training, he finds himself cast in the role of Mephistopheles to Eric's Faust. They make quite a match - Eric is a poor demonologist and Rincewind makes a poor demon. But there is more going on than meets the eye, the new King of the Demons wants to know who this Rincewind is and how he got there, and he's not happy.
This is another great Discworld book, one of my favorites. As always, especially with the early books, Terry Pratchett does an excellent job of spinning a yarn that is a wonderful parody of something (Goethe's Faust in this case) and is also laugh-out-loud funny! This is a great book, one that I highly recommend!
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kids! Beware - calling upon demons can be dangerous!, 24 Jun 2001
By A Customer
Those who wish to summon a demon are really not successful. At least not in this universe. On the Discworld, those caling demons tend to have a little more luck. Eric, the more-or-less-hero of this tale, manages to summon something of a demon-esque pursuasion. It's just such a shame that he managed to call upon Rincewind.
This particular Ricwind-oriented story is of excellent quality, feels rushed. It is all too easy to finish the book very quickly. Compared to other Pratchett novels, this one feels that it has just begin to hit its stride and then quickly tails to a quick, but impressive finish. That is not to say that it is not a good book, ot that the story is lacking - both are excellent. It's just that this particular novel is a little on the short side. Nevertheless it makes for a good read, and a fine addition to any collection.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Demons, Death, Luggage, Rincewind and of course Eric, 19 May 2000
By A Customer
When i first got it, i thought "bit small" when i read it i wished it was at least 100 pages longer.... Very funny in places, insights into the meaning of hell, and also the reason why religion isn't all its cracked up to be. My advice is Read it, thats it READ IT NOW..
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good as ever, 15 Sep 2006
By 
Mr. J. J. Percival "sedgemoor" (Hungerford(ish), UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
There is little in this world as dependable as Pratchett. Though one of his shortest, and with a story line unashamedly borrowed (riped of in technical speak) it's a joy to read from cover to cover. He even manages to squeeze that most popular of Discworld inhabitants in - Read it, though not in public, as people give you funny looks
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Okay, not up to standard., 28 Aug 2000
By A Customer
I got this as a birthday present, apparently after much dithering over exactly which Discworld book to get (Many fans of Sci-Fi/Fantasy, get this with relatives, believe me!). I thought this would make a short, preferably interesting fill-in before 'Reaper Man', unfortunately this was not what I got. Although 'Eric' does have it's good points, the concept of the separate Hell's is particularly good. It did not, however, as Discworld goes, grab my imagination. This is not to say the return of the original Discworld resident Rincewind and the homicidal Luggage wasn't welcomed. An acceptable effort by Pratchett, but on what is a interesting idea of time-travel, unfortunately not up to his usual standard.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Short and sweet, 16 Mar 2010
This is the ninth instalment in the Discworld series and heralds the fourth run out for Rincewind.

Its probably the shortest Discworld book that will ever be written and feels a little shallow for it, having said that it is a complete story and runs through the typical character introductions before embarking on a hard to believe adventure. In this case Rincewind is used and abused in a fiendish plot basically involving the hoards of hell, who themselves are plagued by a type of business management consultant, and the equivalent of Discworld devil worshipper!

Not so good as a standalone book due to its length, but a good one to read in series.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An undervalued gem, 18 Mar 2001
By A Customer
Okay, so I'll start by admitting that this is hardly the best of the Discworld series. But I feel many of the other reviews here don't do it justice. Yes its shorter than the rest, but as I keep telling my girlfriend: "Length doesn't ensure quality." What no-one else has mentioned is that this book was originally published featuring illustrations by Paul Kirby (the guy who does the Discworld front covers), and was in fact written with this in mind. So, the plot does jump quickly from one place to another, but this doesn't detract from the fact that the book is just a fun read, featuring some very funny, well observed characters.
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Eric: Discworld: The Unseen University Collection
Eric: Discworld: The Unseen University Collection by Terry Pratchett (Hardcover - 6 Feb 2014)
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