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89 of 103 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't read the reviews - read the book (and no, the irony of this title for a review is not lost on me...)
It occurred to me recently that I tend to tense up when I have to pass near a group of young men on the street, particularly if they're shouting, or seem drunk. And as a middle-aged man, I'm virtually invisible to them. It then struck me quite forcibly how much worse it must be if you're someone they might actually notice. That is, a woman.

One of my female...
Published 10 months ago by T. Pieraccini

versus
8 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Read and understood, but not confirmed
Whilst a worthwhile read for a 99p download, I found this a challenging book to fully digest. The content is heavily bulked out by the quotes included and some of the points made seem somewhat laboured, overlapping and repetitive. I started to skim some of the paragraphs in later chapters first before reading in detail for new information and points that hadn’t been...
Published 8 months ago by Paul Dyer


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89 of 103 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Don't read the reviews - read the book (and no, the irony of this title for a review is not lost on me...), 4 May 2014
By 
T. Pieraccini (Brighton, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Everyday Sexism (Kindle Edition)
It occurred to me recently that I tend to tense up when I have to pass near a group of young men on the street, particularly if they're shouting, or seem drunk. And as a middle-aged man, I'm virtually invisible to them. It then struck me quite forcibly how much worse it must be if you're someone they might actually notice. That is, a woman.

One of my female friends was followed to her front door a fortnight ago. Fortunately nothing happened bar a vague threat, but she was understandably shaken. I have only recently come to realise how much incidents like this are part of everyday life for women.

Sexism in society is apparently a contentious topic. I was not surprised to see some one-star ratings for this book. I was slightly surprised that they came seemingly from literate and intelligent people. I was taken aback to see at least two of them came from women. I was frankly staggered at what they seemed to take away after reading this superb and necessary book.

I have followed the Everyday Sexism project on Twitter for a long time, and I did wonder if much of this book would be familiar. It was, but that didn't prevent my jaw dropping every page or two in disbelief (accompanied often by an audible exclamation). The experiences describe here comprise everyday reality for women, but as a white male the picture still shocks me when I'm faced with it. Looking at the critical reviews, I find it really difficult to believe that anyone could read to the end of this book and claim that Laura Bates is simply 'whining' or that it represents 'a collection of many anecdotes that would make a child laugh'. Laugh? The experience of women as presented here is appalling, and all too believable. The point, as the book makes clear, is that incidents that in isolation might seem comparatively trivial (and some of the things described are very far from trivial) take on a completely different aspect as part of constant stream of abuse and belittlement.

The book is not anti-men, as has also been claimed. Laura Bates goes out of her way to stress exactly the opposite - that this is one struggle that we really *are* all in together: 'Given that feminism simply means thinking everybody should be treated equally, regardless of sex, the entry criteria is refreshingly wide.' And while her focus is quite properly on the broader problems facing women, Bates takes time to look at things that affect men, and also other groups within society who face additional obstacles (because of race, sexual orientation or disability) to simply being their best selves.

One of the first reviews of the book that I read found it frustrating that no practical solutions were offered. I'm not sure how the reviewer arrived at that conclusion. The final chapter of the book outlines the clearest solution of all - that we all do whatever we can to confront and minimise sexism whenever we encounter it - and offers many practical examples of how this might work in various situations. If the majority of the book made me gasp in dismay, the last few pages occasionally found me blinking away tears at some of the victories that have already been achieved.

I have occasionally had reservations about some of Laura Bates' examples of sexism in articles (her focus on 'Mick Jagger's girlfriend' being described as such in a headline seemed a little misguided when surely the same thing would have happened to a partner of Katy Perry, Kim Kardashian or Lady Gaga--I'm not denying that this is a common problem of representation for women but the issue in this case was most likely comparative fame, not gender) - but I have no such qualms or quibbles about anything included in this book. This is impossible to ignore or dismiss; clearly presented, powerfully argued, and all very much to the point.

And if you might reasonably object that as a man I might have a shaky grasp of exactly what the point is, I refer you to the title of this review. Don't read what I think, don't read the critical reviews, read the book. It's about all of us, it's for all of us. And it could make a real difference.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Everyday Sexism, 20 Oct. 2014
By 
Damaskcat (UK) - See all my reviews
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I can remember stumbling across the Everyday Sexism Project not long after it first started and being totally stunned and shocked by how much sexism there still is around. Yes we have the laws which say everyone is equal but laws really don't have much impact on many people's daily lives it seems. This book is not just about sexism against women it includes many equally shocking and disturbing examples of sexism against men and boys too.

What many people don't appreciate is that sexism harms everyone and it is only by a drastic culture change that things will improve. Culture change doesn't just happen because a few people decide it will - it has to be bigger than that. I've heard people say that many sexist comments and sexist behaviour is just normal banter and you should just get a sense of humour and accept it but sexism is far more than that when it colours your everyday life and affects the way you behave in normal everyday situations. Do you cross the road to avoid wolf whistles and crude comments? Do you avoid working past one particular man's desk at work because you know he will try and grope you? Do you avoid telling your friends that actually you quite like the colour pink? If you do then sexism is affecting your everyday life.

Sexism in the work place, sexism at home in the family, sexism when you're out enjoying a social occasion, sexism when you're online. It affects us all at some time or another. Men as well as women. If you're a man, think for a moment how your friends and colleagues would react if you applied for paternity leave because you wanted to take on part of the childcare for your new born baby? How would everyone you know behave if you announced you were staying at home to look after your children and your wife was going back to work? How would you feel if you really wanted to train as a nurse or a ballet dancer or had to take on a part time job as a cleaner to make ends meet? The chances are you would suddenly be the recipient of a great many sexist comments.

Sexism harms all of us and the only way we can change society is to challenge it wherever we meet it. If you thought the equality legislation had stamped out sexism - then read this book and weep. It is still very much alive and living near you. People are people. It shouldn't matter what their skin colour is, what their sexual orientation is or their religion or their gender. If we related to one another first and foremost as people then sexism - or any other 'ism'- wouldn't exist.

If you think this book is only about sexism and women then you could not be more wrong. Read it and see for yourself. It will make you angry and it may make you cry - with sadness, rage and frustration. Hopefully it will inspire you to challenge sexism wherever you see it and not accept it as 'just a joke'.
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77 of 94 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enlightening, infuriating, depressing & hopeful., 18 April 2014
By 
Thomas Pegg - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Everyday Sexism (Kindle Edition)
Some months ago I stumbled across the twitter feed that the author had created. Like, I suspect, many guys my first impression was to wonder if this was exaggerated, I thought that equality had happened already... so I did my own straw poll of the women I knew only to find that almost all had at least one story to tell. Many had more than one. Some of them were tough to hear.

Surely the time has come for our mothers, sisters, wives & daughters to walk alongside us in equality.

This book opens your eyes to what is happening, how the little abuses enable the greater abuses and why anyone who cares should step up. Not just once in a while but every day. After several chapters that will depress & annoy anyone with a heart Laura ends on a note of hope for the future.

This is one of those books where the message is one that needs drilling into the brain of everyone.
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26 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The only bad thing about this book is that it will not be read by the people who really ought to read it., 8 May 2014
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This review is from: Everyday Sexism (Kindle Edition)
I’m lucky to live in a part of the world where women have equal rights to men in law, but this has yet to translate into day-to-day life. Everyday, women have to deal with street harassment, ‘harmless’ banter and unsolicited opinions on how to dress, what to eat and how to rear their children (if they even want children). Welcome to the world of everyday sexism.

It can be argued that what we have to deal with isn’t as important as issues like female genital mutilation. I would counter that, while each individual act of sexism is a small hailstone, the constant barrage of microagressions along side the more visible forms of harassment and violence are a never-ending hailstorm. We should not have to tolerate this kind of abuse just because other people might have it worse. We can speak out against cat-calling and about the denial of the right to education for women; it is not an either-or situation.

Bates founded the Everyday Sexism Project to show how ingrained sexism is in UK culture, and even she was shocked at how deeply rooted it is. Now, women from all over the world share their brushes with sexism. Sexism in our society can no longer be denied, or ignored. From the experiences shared at ESP, Bates put together a collection of essays looking at different facets of sexism: young women, women in public spaces, the media, the workplace and in education, motherhood and the intersectionality of sexism with other forms of discrimination.

It is a real eye-opener, even for people who consider themselves educated on such issues. It is a harrowing read in places, as Bates shares real experiences of violence and harassment. Anger may also be induced. The only bad thing about this book is that it will not be read by the people who really ought to read it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Recommed to anyone, 13 Feb. 2015
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An incrediable read, for a old feminist, to someone who wants to learn the basics. It is an inspiring read, that leaves you completely chnaged. I would recommed to anyone of all ages
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent survey of discrimination and its effects, 2 Feb. 2015
By 
William Podmore (London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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In this outstanding book, Laura Bates exposes the links between everyday incidences of sexism and aggression towards women. She argues that we should never tolerate discrimination and insult.

The government’s own research found ‘a clear link between consumption of sexualized images, a tendency to view women as objects and the acceptance of aggressive attitudes and behaviour as the norm’. When an MP raised this in the Commons, Cameron, Osborne and the men on the front bench laughed at her.

The author Bates shows how “the steady drip-drip-drip of sexism and sexualisation and objectification is connected to the assumption of ownership and control over women’s bodies, and how the background noise of harassment and disrespect connects to the assertion of power that is violence and rape.”

In law, a person (A) commits an offence if he intentionally touches another person (B), the touching is sexual, B does not consent to the touching, and A does not reasonably believe that B consents. But all too often these offences are not taken seriously. For example, as she comments, “The cavalier media response to the Rennard allegations (bumbling buffoon accidentally comes on too strong – what’s all the fuss about?) would have it that ‘so-called’ workplace harassment merely constitutes clumsy, misplaced attempts at flirting between peers.”

A fifth of British women suffer sexual assault. 85,000 women are raped every year. Only 15 per cent of female victims of the most serious sexual offences report it to the police; 28 per cent of them never tell anybody about it. In the UK, 100 women are killed every year by a current or former partner. To call domestic abuse a ‘woman’s issue’ is to absolve perpetrators of responsibility.

She observes, “there’s a lot to overcome if we’re going to start talking properly about sexism, sexual harassment and assault. The invisibility; the social acceptability and normalization; the dismissal, disbelief and blaming of victims; and the accusations of being a Humourless Feminist BoreTM.” Of student life, she writes, “The sexualized initiations and ‘slut’-, ‘slag’- or ‘hoe’-themed events blend seamlessly into the backdrop of a youth culture increasingly saturated with sexism, normalized harassment and an ever-growing social acceptance of sexual assault and rape.” She sums up, “this is a culture steeped in misogyny and the objectification and subjugation of women - and yes, it does have a real impact.”

The employing class still solidly discriminates against women. Women working full-time in the UK in 2012 earned 14.9 per cent less than men, in the City of London 33 per cent less, in the finance sector 55 per cent less. The Equal Opportunities Commission found that about 30,000 women every year lost their jobs as a result of pregnancy discrimination. The unemployment rate for women in March 2012 was almost 20 per cent higher than in 2009; male unemployment had barely risen.

In public life too, women lose out. The UK is 60th in the world for gender parity in parliament, with women being 22.6 per cent of MPs. Cuba has 48.9 per cent. Fewer than one in ten of the guests on the ‘progressive’ comedy panel show Mock the Week has been female.

Laura Bates ends by citing a woman who says, “the Everyday Sexism project shows us all that it is the insidious nature of small, everyday occurrences which erode an individual’s confidence and freedom, and society’s integrity and fairness; and that it IS worth rearranging even the smallest stone in order to redirect the flow of the river.”
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5.0 out of 5 stars brilliant!!!!, 22 Feb. 2015
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This review is from: Everyday Sexism (Kindle Edition)
This should be a text used in every secondary school across the country!! Brilliant, if somewhat harrowing, reading. Download it now!
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Epic: a modern classic of abuse that affects us all, 13 Oct. 2014
By 
Niklas Pivic (Stockholm, Sweden) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Everyday Sexism (Hardcover)
The only strange thing that I find about this book is that it's both epic and wondrous at the same time that it's extremely common and its contents permeates the lives of everyone I know, including myself.

The trees cannot often be seen because of the forest that's there.

I started following the @EverydaySexism account on Twitter about a year ago and have learned a lot about myself, how men work and - above all - how common it is for men to discriminate against women, and to sexually attack women, verbally and physically.

It's one thing to *know* this, but it is something else to realise it; I don't think I ever will, as I was born with penis. As such, the closest that I have come to being submitted to sexual discrimination is when I've stood up against sexism at the workplace.

Having said that, women are the target of 98% of all sexual violence, all over the globe. This book displays how women are targeted daily, through snide comments, groping, getting paid lower wages than men, being subjected to a plethora of offences from the minor to the major, in ways that men rarely are subjected to, but mainly commit.

The main three things, I feel, that this book addresses, are:

1. The fact that this pandemic is true and integrated into society in so many ways
2. It shows that one is not mad for recognising it, as one is not alone; there are so many reports from persons who have been subjected to daily sexualised abuse that all the "can't you take a joke?" are truly seen as the offenders, as they should be
3. It provides hope - it looks into what can be done, what has been done and what is being done.

The book is filled with hope, even though the contents are so depressing. But rather than focusing on the victims, this book is feministic; it focuses on the fact that all guilt, all "blame", if you will, should reside with the attackers, and not the persons who are being attacked.

Everything in this book is very well explained, and there are so many examples and good things in here, that I cannot possibly do it justice in a simple review. Buy it, read it, follow the project and better yourself. The book made me want to become a better person.
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31 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Life changing, 18 April 2014
This review is from: Everyday Sexism (Hardcover)
I knew about and had been following this movement but didn't know what to expect from the book.

I found a book so thought-provoking and well written I found myself laughing and crying in equal measure but always, always wanting to keep reading.

I've found myself begging all my friends and family (men and women) to read this book- I've bought 3 copies now. And it's all I can do not to press it into the hands of bemused strangers.

People need to read this book. To think about what the people in it are saying and to open their eyes and hearts to its message.

A fantastic read!!
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars oh but it is true, 8 May 2014
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Please, please read this. It will sadden, shock, anger but hopefully empower. Thank you Laura Bates and all those
brave women and men who contributed.
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Everyday Sexism
Everyday Sexism by Laura Bates (Hardcover - 10 April 2014)
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