Customer Reviews


7 Reviews
5 star:
 (4)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top notch near future novel that makes one wish it were true
FIRESTAR is a very near future novel about an extremely wealthy business woman who believes that we need to be in space. She launches a very complicated, expensive, and VERY BELIEVABLE plan to get us there.
There are good guys, bad guys, flawed heroes and heroines, action, "police action," intrigue, great science, and extremely believable characters...
Published on 10 Nov 1998

versus
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Distressingly dull How-to-save-the-world manifesto.
Flynn's exposition of a Rand-esque privatization of the US education system and space program reads like a Libertarian Party position paper -- it is interesting only to other Libertarians. The characterizations would be laughable if they weren't so trite. Rich young idealistic heiress finds love and destiny with old, poor, burned-out teacher, incidentally solving...
Published on 2 Jun 1999


Most Helpful First | Newest First

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top notch near future novel that makes one wish it were true, 10 Nov 1998
By A Customer
FIRESTAR is a very near future novel about an extremely wealthy business woman who believes that we need to be in space. She launches a very complicated, expensive, and VERY BELIEVABLE plan to get us there.
There are good guys, bad guys, flawed heroes and heroines, action, "police action," intrigue, great science, and extremely believable characters and situations.
If you want a book that will make you think as well as challenge your assumptions in a lot of different areas you will love it. If however, you are a doctrinaire Liberal, Libertarian, or Conservative you will hate this book.
Flynn has a deep respect for Robert Heinlein. A number of writers over the years have been acclaimed as the next Heinlein only to falter. Flynn is the first I have seen that has a real chance of truly deserving that type of honorific. This novel fares very favorably with Heinlein at his best and is head and shoulders above 90% of what passes for SF.
Mike
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Distressingly dull How-to-save-the-world manifesto., 2 Jun 1999
By A Customer
Flynn's exposition of a Rand-esque privatization of the US education system and space program reads like a Libertarian Party position paper -- it is interesting only to other Libertarians. The characterizations would be laughable if they weren't so trite. Rich young idealistic heiress finds love and destiny with old, poor, burned-out teacher, incidentally solving the crisis in the American educational system and putting the American space program back on track. Feh. A disappointing rehash of themes Rand and Heinlein have already championed with far more style.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Buy and Bye, 13 Dec 2012
By 
John M. Ford "johnDC" (near DC, MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Mariesa van Huyten inherited and expanded a financial empire in a world where security, education and innovation are all in decline. She rebuilds Earth's space capabilities ship by ship and contract by contract. She is driven by fears and plans she reveals partially and to only a few around her. There is even a certain distance between her and her new husband. She sacrifices a great deal to build Earth's capability to... what exactly she does not completely disclose.

Ned Dubois is an aging astronaut without a space program and a lost man without his estranged wife and daughter. Also without much information, he signs on to fly experimental aircraft for an obscure Brazilian company. There he encounters old friends and rivals from the U.S.--Soviet space race. And he competes for a position on a new space mission. Destination unspecified.

This is the first book in a four-part series. It feels a little less complete than the first of a four-act play usually does. There is some action, some intrigue, and some romance. There is a lot of character development. Some pays off in this book; hopefully less will be necessary in the next three. The characters range in complexity, but are mostly interesting. There is at least one readers will enjoy hating.

The author's politics seem a little further to the right than those of most science fiction writers. His story celebrates initiative, achievement, and private enterprise. And he pokes fun at several politically-correct sacred cows. My favorite tongue-in-cheek moment is when an anti-space coalition struggles to hold a meeting while representatives of various factions condemn one another's un-PC word choices. It's a refreshing change from the overly-righteous greenness in some contemporary science fiction.

It's a good story, even if it doesn't match your politics. But make the commitment up front to read the next three books: Rogue Star, Lodestar and Falling Stars. The first book will leave you with unscratched itches if you walk away from the rest. You can't read just one.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Gripping, great story line, 26 Mar 1999
By A Customer
I really liked this book, and found it difficult to put it down. The characters are good, the writing is good, the plot is good. Can't wait to read Rogue Star.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars inspiring hard science in the near future, 7 Sep 1998
By A Customer
If only we had a Mariesa van Huyten to lead us back to space. The characters are complex. The politics nerve racking. The hard science exciting. All together a great read that makes me wish for more from this author.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Great near future novel...only hope we can get there., 3 Mar 1998
By A Customer
I just finished reading Ben Bova's "Moonrise" and both novels make a GREAT case for privatization of global space programs. Flynn really knows how to develop characters, both protagonists and antagonists, that contain positive as well negative attributes. Great reading and hard to put down, although the last 100 pages seemed a bit ambiguous and crunched for an ending. It definitely left me with a desire for more. SSTO is now one of my favorite subjects.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book for anyone fed-up with the current system, 24 April 1999
By A Customer
This book has some excellent ideas for changing the way people are educated. It may be science fiction now but in five years it will be science. With the increase in competition in the education industry look to see some changes that closely resemble the ideas in this book. And once people are properly educated we will see a resurgence in the space programs. Pretty soon more and more people will see the need to get off this rock! And with the help of this book and some other ideas from pioneering authors such as Michael Flynn we will get off this rock.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Firestar (Firestar Saga)
Firestar (Firestar Saga) by Michael Flynn (Audio CD - Nov 2012)
Used & New from: 92.45
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews