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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Insightful!
The good news is, Richard Florida’s book recognizes the growing economic and sociological impact of creativity. The bad news is that in just two years, it has lost some of its gloss. The collapse of the bull market, the popping of the dot.com bubble, the 9/11 trauma, each took some shine off of the creative economy, with its casual dress days, flexible schedules and...
Published on 15 Oct 2003 by Rolf Dobelli

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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A poor cousin
Compared to other texts on the same subject (Manuel Castells; Robert Reich; Jeremy Rifkin) I found this text to be a rather 'trashy' light-weight ego-centric account of the increased stratification of work, employment and society. It is airport-lounge chic-lit, to Castell's magnus opus.
Published on 28 Mar 2005 by P. Clapp


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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A poor cousin, 28 Mar 2005
By 
P. Clapp "clappy" (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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Compared to other texts on the same subject (Manuel Castells; Robert Reich; Jeremy Rifkin) I found this text to be a rather 'trashy' light-weight ego-centric account of the increased stratification of work, employment and society. It is airport-lounge chic-lit, to Castell's magnus opus.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Insightful!, 15 Oct 2003
By 
Rolf Dobelli "getAbstract" (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
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The good news is, Richard Florida’s book recognizes the growing economic and sociological impact of creativity. The bad news is that in just two years, it has lost some of its gloss. The collapse of the bull market, the popping of the dot.com bubble, the 9/11 trauma, each took some shine off of the creative economy, with its casual dress days, flexible schedules and free rides. But even though this appraisal occasionally sounds quaint, we believe that the book’s faith in the transforming economic and social power of creativity, its broad view, and its excellent references and quotations make it worth recommending.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The Horror of the American Workplace, 2 Jan 2011
By 
Dr. G. SPORTON "groggery1" (Birmingham UK) - See all my reviews
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This really ought to be called 'The Horror of the American Workplace', given the description of how exploitative American companies appear to be of the very essence of their employees and the organisations with whom they work. According to this book, there is no part of the human being that cannot be put to the service of business. This point aside, Florida's work, despite its profound and irredeemable flaws, is not without interest as a social document demonstrating the intellectual tangle that is created as a means of studying an apparently simple question. Florida's definition of the very class he seeks to identify and call to community action struggles because it simply does not have enough in common with one another to justify the definition. His interpretation of creativity includes anyone with an education and the opportunity to make a living from it, and this is simply too broad: heart surgeons, IT people (whoever they are) and artists are all lumped in as having common cause, but the argument fails because, quite simply, they don't. What they do have is the capacity to make choices for themselves, and in a society transformed by technology and determined by loose social ties they vote with their feet.

The creation of a wage-slave class in the US since the Reagan years is the real problem here, as it entirely wastes the potential and investment in a broad swathe of American society. They are excluded from decision-making (and not from creativity, which they are expected to employ in dealing with their customers), and as such this looks a lot like a straightforward Marxist division of labour. The problem for Americans is that they can't acknowledge this deep split in their social arrangements for two reasons. The first that that the National Story insists that the US is a meritocracy, and the second is that it is the attraction of this story that continues to draw large numbers of immigrants to depress the cost of wages in the service sector. In the end, Florida has missed the point, and obliquely uncovered that those, like himself, with money, possibilities and imagination show no loyalty to anyone when it comes to furthering their self-interest. My astonishment is that it took him so long to find it out, and that so many people needed him to point it out for them.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Needs a good edit, 26 Sep 2011
By 
Working in this area I thought I'd better brush up on my knowledge and see what all the fuss is about Richard Florida while I was at it. I wouldn't say a complete waste of time but not far off. Pilfering the research of others, adding some dubious stats and mixing a good dose of general knowledge to come up with a new theory on the "Creative Class"? Not convinced! If it had a good edit to knock out the repetitiveness it'd be a much stronger book. But as it stands you're toiling your way through over 400 pages; as someone who's a fairly avid reader it took a few months to finish and that was more will power than anything. I found the chapters on working conditions quite interesting, as well as his concept of the "three Ts" but generally it was dull, badly written and his writing style too bloated and bombastic. His attempt at the start of the book to build the "Creative Class" into the history of man was just a step too far, as was the fact that this group he speaks of is extremely exclusive yet he attempts to make it seem the norm. It's also a very American centric book, although his stray at the end into Dublin as an epitome of good practice is perhaps a warning that he stick to the US. I enjoy Florida's other work in the Atlanta Magazine so will stick to his articles in future.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Insightful!, 8 Jun 2004
By 
Rolf Dobelli "getAbstract" (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
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The good news is, Richard Florida's book recognizes the growing economic and sociological impact of creativity. The bad news is that in just two years, it has lost some of its gloss. The collapse of the bull market, the popping of the dot.com bubble, the 9/11 trauma, each took some shine off of the creative economy, with its casual dress days, flexible schedules and free rides. But even though this appraisal occasionally sounds quaint, we believe that the book's faith in the transforming economic and social power of creativity, its broad view, and its excellent references and quotations make it worth recommending.
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and thought provoking stuff, 8 Aug 2002
By 
Andrew Howell "andyhowell3" (Birmingham, UK) - See all my reviews
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Creative people cluster in cities, but in those cities which offer them the kinds of lifestyle and diversity that they are looking for. Gone are the days when key staff accept the need to be mobile, to follow the employer. Today employers are relocating to those cities that are home to 'the creative class'.
Cities with sizable clusters of the creative class are those which are the most innovative. Why are some so much better than other?
Florida's book draws on years of solid work and explores the development of the new 'creative class', the conditions in which they thrive and the challenges presented to those cities which want to develop and innovate.
I found this a very thought provoking book. It will challenge many of those who work in the economic development arena.
If you still find Jane Jacobs inspiring 40 years on, this will be the book for you!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Groundbreaking book, 18 Nov 2010
The Rise of the Creative Class and How It's Transforming Work, Life, Community and Everyday Life gives us a sobering new picture of what contributes to regional development,
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