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38 Reviews
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Memories of Roz Persist at Barton's Bookshop
I was so impressed with this book that I persuaded Roz to hold a signing session in my shop. She agreed and we had a splendid morning and afternoon with lots of customers buying copies of Roz's books. They are so good that I just leave copies on the counter, talk about them a bit and let them sell themselves. I realise this is a strange review so far since it does not...
Published 21 months ago by Peter Snell

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2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars really did not like this book
I bought this after being so impressed by a freebie Roz has done 'Nail that Novel' (fabulous and I would have willingly paid for it) and I wanted to see what her creative writing was like. Sucked in by the free sample - which turned out to be the best bit! It was one of those hideous books where none of the characters have any redeeming features, and you end up feeling...
Published on 1 Jun. 2012 by honestopinion


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Top shelf read, 25 Aug. 2014
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This remarkable novel reminded me of The End of Mr. Y and Our Tragic Universe, by Scarlett Thomas. (Thomas is one of my Top Shelf Authors = I Want To Write Like That When I Grow Up.)
An unusual blend of the esoteric and the practical, the book follows a pianist diagnosed with RSI (Repetitive Stress Injury). Her curious condition and an accidental encounter peel back various layers of memory, truth and trust, revealing rather more than she expects. Both reader and narrator are left with more questions than answers, but plenty to think about.
As a sufferer of RSI, I sympathised with the narrator and her frustration at being unable to express herself in her own art form. But most of all I was incredibly impressed by a writer of such skill and confidence. She dances between plausible reality and the shadowy realm between truth and perception. Highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent read, 15 Aug. 2012
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I enjoyed this book very much. It was an unusual read for me, but I read it because I've also enjoyed some of Roz Morris's other work. The ideas behind it are fresh, the plot unpredictable to the end and the characters interesting; I was entirely engaged and convinced by the main character's life. I also liked the writing itself very much, with its story within a story having echoes of others such as Atwood's 'Blind Assassin'.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best thing I've read for ages, 19 Jun. 2012
This is a beautifully written, multi-layered story with totally convincing characters and a very clever plot. It's one of those novels which really makes you think, and stays with you long after you finished it. I thoroughly recommend it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great read, 31 Mar. 2012
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A highly original premise delivered with aplomb. This 'when worlds collide' story is both haunting and compelling. High quality writing, as you would expect from an already commercially successful author. A novel that stays with you long after the reading.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From a Jealous Professional, 18 Mar. 2012
By 
Wench (West Midlands, UK) - See all my reviews
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I have had to wrestle with monsters of professional jealousy to review this book. It is SO good.

Even the premise is one of those striking ideas that seems so beautiful and right, even obvious, but that you know you would never have thought of yourself: - if, by hypnosis, you can be regressed into a past life, could you be progressed to a future life? My immediate response was: Wish I'd thought of that! But I didn't. Roz Morris did.

It's far more than a great idea. From the very first page, the prose is a sheer pleasure to read. It's a first-person narration by Carol Lear, and her voice is alive, witty, perceptive, expressive. I laughed aloud several times at her dry, neat nailing of a situation or person.

Carol is a classical pianist, passionate about her instrument and music, raging against the limitations placed on her by repetitive strain injury (the pain of which is so well described, it made my hands ache.)

She's frustrated because her pain doesn't respond to treatment. A close friend, suffering from panic attacks is in a similar situation - but his problems seem to be solved when he undergoes a past life regression. The unresolved trauma of his previous life has spilled over into his present life, causing his attacks; and only when he faces what happened in his previous existence can his panics be controlled. Carol is so desperate to be free of pain and to play again that, although sceptical, she is drawn to the idea of other lives - and, indeed, to the hypnotist, the elusive, attractive Gene Winter.

Carol experiences not a past life, but a future one. If the trauma of the life you're living is shaping the life of an unknown stranger in a future you can't recognise, what should you do?

It's not a book easily categorised. Should I call it a literary novel? Science Fiction? Romance? You could make a case for including it in any one of those genres.

While reading, I several times thought I could predict the ending. I was always wrong. But the ending, when I reluctantly reached it, was beautiful, thoughtful, and right. It brought a realisation that the novel had never been about what I thought it had been about, and made me want to read it again, so I could enjoy the skill with which it had all been handled.

It isn't about attacking and solving problems. It's about, I think, the way we cause our own problems, but hide from them, preferring to fall over them and hurt ourselves again and again, rather than see those problems clearly, or - that thing we dread - changing.

It's about resolution, about picking ourselves up, sorting ourselves out, and going on. Not, perhaps, solving the problem - which may be insoluable - but doing that very hard thing, changing, and walking away, leaving old things behind. Not, after all, memories of a future life, but - life in the future.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars When the future and past collide, 1 Feb. 2012
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C. Wight (Turriff, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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Two, or is it three, worlds collide in this remarkable novel where nothing is quite what it seems. I have a pathological dislike of the piano and a personal distrust of mediums (both instilled by my mother) but strangely, this was enough to keep me interested in the central character who narrates the story, as she was forced to try and reconcile the her personal trauma as a concert pianist disabled by RSI with the bizarre world of hypnosis and clairvoyancy which claims to be able to `heal' her. The central conceit of the novel, that past lives interests people - there's big money in it as Carole's flat mate discovers- is offered an interesting twist by the consideration of what happens if you discover that you are the past life?
Carole is forced to address this issue and reflects
`If I'm somebody's past, if I was delivered into a future life, I know the rules. It means this life is done. It's all over.'
However, in her case it is far from all over. Her life appears to be falling apart and her relationships are never what they seem. The brooding, doctor/therapist Gene who claims to be helping her deal with the physical and psychological issues arising from being a regression of Andreq, is by turns romantic lead and demonic villain. In Andreq we find a character from a future which keeps the reader in a state of dis-ease throughout the four episodes of the novel. There was an interesting juxtaposition and blending of reality and fantasy and it's a clever way of getting us to empathise with the central character. I loved the insight into the `alien' worlds of the pianist, medium. My interest in what exactly xeching might be went a long way to propel me through the narrative. And of course, the ending couldn't be predicted!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Writing a review means I've finished it. Damn!, 21 Jan. 2012
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I always know I'm reading a particularly good tale when I lay the book (or, in this case, the Kindle) down reluctantly in order to do something more mundane - like working or cooking or eating. And this was most certainly a good tale, excellently told. Roz Morris's narrative style and flair for spot-on description took me right into Carol's world and had me loving and hating and wondering about Gene (and just what he might be playing at). I couldn't wait to get back to the story after each abandonment and I even read it in the bath - using the app on my Android phone rather than taking the risk of dunking the Kindle itself.

The author is a wonderful storyteller as well as a quality writer - the perfect combination - and I look forward to reading more of her fiction soon.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why do I keep thinking about it?, 5 Oct. 2011
when I first read this novel, it was broken into four parts and it was painful having to wait for the next installment. I was hooked from the start and was intrigued by the characters and what their motivations were, especially that of Gene. I still think about him fromtime to time, but little things in my daily life remind me of Carol Lear and what she went through. If I touch a piano, I know how she feels at not being able to play again, how 5min fingering the keys will mean a pain that could last the entire day. What would one do not to have to live in pain.

Carol's journey was portrayed in such a realistic manner that it is impossible not to be there with her, feel for her. The other characters are also mesmerizing and intriguing, which gave the novel its intesity. At times I wanted to react for Carol and even protect her. But alas, this story is about Carol, her struggle and eventually, making peace with herself and her condition. I absolutely loved it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written, evocative and absorbing, 27 Sept. 2011
Beautifully written, evocative and absorbing: Have now finished the whole book (reviewed part one previously). Early on it reminded me a little of The Time Traveller's wife; like that book the imagery is strong and it too has layers of story within a story. However it developed, changed and grew into something quite different. The characters are believable and many are appealing: Eleanor and Gerry, but not all are likeable: Greg Winter. Despite not being musical myself or having RSI I really could empathise with Carol: brilliantly drawn. At times it was dreamlike and surreal and others down to earth and done with a great sense of humour. The most innovative book I have read this year: recommend you read it and see for yourself.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Painfully accurate, 26 Sept. 2011
By 
Mrs. Helen Burton (UK) - See all my reviews
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It is an opportune moment to delve into the dangerous powers of mind over matter when even the fiercely sceptical New Scientist magazine recently concluded that hypnosis is surprisingly effective at treating pain. We experiment for ourselves with a heroine desperate enough to get into situations we'd prefer to experience vicariously. Yet the adventure manages to take over the reader's mind too: don't plan to read just a few pages and try not to start reading it alone in the dark. It starts off very grounded in the grime of London's busy Clapham Junction railway station and the twinges of a quintessentially modern affliction, RSI, keenly observed, but it gets darker.You have been warned.
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My Memories of a Future Life
My Memories of a Future Life by Roz Morris (Paperback - 18 Sept. 2011)
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