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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth reading
K F Long provides a decent overview of a necessarily difficult topic. The propulsion methods covered are beyond our current technology, though the science supporting these approaches is clear. This book provides a useful survey of the current state of knowledge, staying within the borders of known science. The math is not for the faint hearted, however readers who are not...
Published on 18 April 2012 by Daniel

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing
This looks like a self-published work - spelling mistakes, strange grammar, poor punctuation. A few of the illustrations are rather wonky amateur pencil sketches. It's amazing that a publishing house like Springer let this one slip out in this condition; they must be economizing on sub-editors.
The "deep space propulsion" section doesn't start until page 139. The...
Published 16 months ago by Grant Hutchison


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 2 Mar 2013
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This looks like a self-published work - spelling mistakes, strange grammar, poor punctuation. A few of the illustrations are rather wonky amateur pencil sketches. It's amazing that a publishing house like Springer let this one slip out in this condition; they must be economizing on sub-editors.
The "deep space propulsion" section doesn't start until page 139. The "roadmap to interstellar flight" is a sketchy final chapter. The first hundred pages discuss topics as diverse as aircraft design, the planets of the solar system, evolution, and the design of the British Interplanetary Society 1930s lunar lander. The author seems to be a bit vexed that Pluto is no longer a planet, but misunderstands why its status was changed.
The discussion of deep space propulsion is an odd mixture of detail (lots of handy equations, if you are prepared to trust them in the presence of such poor editing), and skimpiness. We have engines here that produce neutrons and gamma rays, but there's essentially no information on the practicalities of shielding a crew from radiation, for instance. Huge lasers are introduced, but with no discussion of how you might build or power such a thing, where you would put it and how you would aim it over large distances.

Needs a good editor and a more systematic approach.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth reading, 18 April 2012
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This review is from: Deep Space Propulsion: A Roadmap to Interstellar Flight (Astronomers' Universe) (Paperback)
K F Long provides a decent overview of a necessarily difficult topic. The propulsion methods covered are beyond our current technology, though the science supporting these approaches is clear. This book provides a useful survey of the current state of knowledge, staying within the borders of known science. The math is not for the faint hearted, however readers who are not comfortable with this can extract the meaning and implications of the equations from the text, and the author is not gratuitously using equations - the subject matter demands it. Personally I am assigning four stars instead of five as the writing style is rather dry.
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