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262 of 273 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Compulsory reading for all teachers and parents !
As a teacher of more than 25 years experience, I thought I knew quite a lot about how to educate boys in their last year at primary school. However Steve Biddulph has managed in one fell swoop to make me sit up and really challenge some of my long held beliefs in the way boys should be taught. I bought the book and within 48 hours have read it from cover to cover three...
Published on 27 April 2003 by Mr. Philip G. A. Baldwin

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132 of 159 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Hmmmm...
I had this book recommended to me by word of mouth, which according to the cover blurb is how most people get to hear about it.
The book is intellectually pretty lite and most of what it says is common sense. Spend more time with your children, and boys are different to girls. (But I guess just because something is common sense it can still be worth saying...)...
Published on 18 Feb 2004


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262 of 273 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Compulsory reading for all teachers and parents !, 27 April 2003
By 
Mr. Philip G. A. Baldwin "baldilocks2" (Portishead, Bristol UK) - See all my reviews
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As a teacher of more than 25 years experience, I thought I knew quite a lot about how to educate boys in their last year at primary school. However Steve Biddulph has managed in one fell swoop to make me sit up and really challenge some of my long held beliefs in the way boys should be taught. I bought the book and within 48 hours have read it from cover to cover three times. Some of his observations had me punching the air yelling 'Yes!;some of the stories had me in tears as I recognised incidents from own childhood; and some of the life history stories made me want to hang my head in shame, because I recognised myself as the speaker of certain words, or perpretrator of some actions that caused hurt, bewilderment to the children entrusted to my care. The style is easy to read, but he also has a very powerful way with one liners that are often an uncomfortable jolt back to reality. I would like to equip every parent of every boy I am likely to teach in the future with this book - because there is no doubt - this man is a genius !
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106 of 118 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A lovely,thoughtful book, 28 July 2000
By 
Juliet Powell (Bellevue, WA United States) - See all my reviews
I borrowed this book from my sister(she has two boys, and I have one boy and two girls)and knew that I would have to get my own copy. This book, for a relatively short tome, is packed with anecdotes, ideas and a genuine sense of purpose.I found myself sometimes laughing, often knodding in agreement, and a couple of times crying. Mothers don't know what it's like to be male;this book goes a long way to guide us in the right direction for the long term benefit of our sons, our partners and our future grandsons.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A useful guide for raising boys!, 16 April 2009
Steve Biddulph provides a valuable insight into the development of young boys and highlights all the potential tribulations they may face that do not necessarily present themselves in girls. Raising Boys confronts certain aspects of the parents thought process, linking their actions to specific outcomes later in the child's life.

It is clear from parts of the book that Biddulph has delved deep into the young male psyche, providing a concise yet precise guide documenting the crucial flash points of male development. One section that particularly interested us was the predicament surrounding the mother's need to return to work, specifically the point at which to enter the young child into daycare. Contrary to my own preconceptions, starting a boy at nursery before the age of three can lead to juvenile delinquency later in life.

It has to be said that some of the advice put forward in 'Raising Boys' is common sense. Other comments could be considered as the opinions of the author; to paraphrase, Biddulph suggests that a Woman should find it abnormal a notion to have an opposite-sex child growing inside them, though this is not necessarily the case in reality. However he also points out useful observations such as that the mother has a preconceived technique for raising girls, since they themselves were once girls.

'Raising Boys' has proved its self as a useful reference guide, as well as a relevant documentation covering all the major aspects of a young boy's early growth. Thoroughly recommended.
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65 of 78 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Snappy Perspective on your Growing Male Childs Perspective, 3 May 2003
By A Customer
This book (of the handholding and chit-chat style) is aimed at almost anyone living in close proximity to a growing male; from toddler age onwards.
In ten short chapters, renditions of the everyday and sometimes curious behaviour of boys are portrayed and then explained with reasons from the biological, the innately hormonal, the social or otherwise. With these explanations, the author cites quite plausable reasons and background information (his own personal experience, or real life cases that he has been privy to) to support WHY males behave this way, under these circumstances. Then, quite usefully, we're given possible reactions to these sorts of behaviour that will generate a healthy, personal self-esteem and positive outlook on the child, or adolescent's part.
His themed chapters (early years, hormones, school, relationships with family members, behaviour in sports, etc.) provide wonderfully everyday scenarios of male-behaviour, and the authors own wider persepective on reasons for this. He then follows up with reactions that would be most conducive to bringing out the 'best' from a mixed viewpoint of the child and the neighbouring adult. In other words, procuring a growing male child with a balanced outlook on his family, the wider world and his own capabilities.
Ideal short chapters, with a mixed and interesting type set, photos and snapshot cartoons to give the READER a more lateral vision of the temporal and impresionable male person in their life.
Interesting to look at when you turn every page, but made up of enough understandable, 'ordinary' advice on the 'why' of the behaviour, and the 'how' of manipulating the wonderful being into becoming a 'reasonable' and socially capable male child.
If you could fall asleep on a washing line every night, have very little time but could do with some hand holding 'why he's like this' explanations, followed by some 'what to say/ behave like after this sort of behaviour' then this is it.
Even if you don't USE Steve Biddulph's advice, his book will give you a much wider perspective on your developing male childs psyche.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent.....a must for all parents of boys!, 19 April 1999
By A Customer
I am in the middle of reading this book and think it is absolutely brilliant. It is very easy to read and contains good, simple, solid advice. The way it is written means that it can be dipped into and out of whenever you have a few spare minutes. It is also humorous and honest and, in my opinion, a must for everyone who has a son. Great advice for fathers as well as mothers, teachers and anyone involved in the care of boys.
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132 of 159 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Hmmmm..., 18 Feb 2004
By A Customer
I had this book recommended to me by word of mouth, which according to the cover blurb is how most people get to hear about it.
The book is intellectually pretty lite and most of what it says is common sense. Spend more time with your children, and boys are different to girls. (But I guess just because something is common sense it can still be worth saying...)
I had two main problems with the book. One was coherance. Some bits are written for mums, some for dads, some for teachers and some for policy makers. It is written in 'magazine style', skipping from one topic to the next, which is good if you like to read in bite-size chunks but less good if you want more depth on some of the topics. On a couple of occasions, topics are actually repeated. Also I was left confused as to which statements where the author's own assertions and which bits were actually backed up with research.
My other main problem was it was a bit cheesy, bordering on the offensive, at times. His comments that 'if your son is gay, don't spend too much time thinking about what went wrong' or 'having a gay son can open you to a new world of really interesting people' raised my hackles somewhat. (I am paraphrasing, but only slightly.)
If you want a quick and light introduction into some practical techniques for parenting boys then I guess you could do worse, but if you are expecting anything deeper or more thorough then don't bother.
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88 of 106 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Made a huge difference to our family, 12 Jun 2004
By A Customer
Its easy to see how Steve Bidulphs books have found their way into millions of homes around the world - he is deceptively readable and
friendly in style, but his ideas are powerful and quite revolutionary.
While everyone else was arguing about whether boys and girls were different, he assembles the facts especially from medical and brain research as well as real life experience, but makes it so understandable that it helps you put it into practice straight away.
My husband took on board the idea of playing rough and tumble with our little two year old, and in spite of being a rather reserved man,
found he enjoyed the monster games down on the carpet after work, it has now become a nightly ritual. Our son squeals with delight, and the two of them have a closer relationship. I can see this growing as my husband becomes more relaxed and finds his own way to be a good dad, getting the older children (4 and 9) to do housework, taking them out to the park. Thank you Steve.
The book is a treasure chest of other good ideas - finding a school that is boy friendly, stages and changes that I had never heard of as a girl growing up with no brothers - Raising Boys has made me more confident, and I feel empowered to be proactive in making my sons into good men. My only criticism is that I wanted more - and perhaps a book about girls too ?
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great read for mums (and dads) of little boys, 18 Jun 2009
By 
I've seen more than one criticism of 'Raising Boys' from 'proper' child psychologists, along the lines of: it's not much more than anecdotal commonsense, Steve Biddulph is not trained in child development, his theories are not backed up with empirical evidence etc ... but I LOVE this book and so do millions of others! Yes there are many respected academic studies of male versus female development, which have their place and their devoted readerships - I've even read a few myself. But this beautiful book is written in an accessible style, giving everyday scenarios that all parents can relate to - some of the passages have even brought a lump to my throat as I remember how special a gift sons are. I am the mother of 3 small boys and often worry if I am doing the right things, and this book has inspired me even on the 'darkest days'(!). And that's not just me - I have bought a copy for every friend of mine who's had their first baby boy and they all say the same.
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58 of 70 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Maybe it's not ADHD then!!, 31 Aug 2003
By A Customer
Having read this book - after being at my wits end with my aggressive, hyperactive, loud and mischievious 6 year old (who has been diagnosed with ADHD!) I have now come to the conclusion that he 'just a boy' after all and with the help of his family, he can become a well balanced man.
The book hit a chord with me when Steve Biddulph explained that ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) may after all be Attention Dad Disorder.
I urge every parent to read this book before labelling your son with ADHD. It's certainly a breath of fresh air to know (even it it hurts like hell!!!!) that it may be what you say or do (or don't do??) with your son that causes them to behave as they do - rather than giving them a drug which supresses their imagination and 'uniqness'.
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100 of 121 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really helped me with my son -, 31 Aug 2001
By A Customer
Readers may like to know that Steve Biddulph's books are hugely popular where we come from back in Australia - used in almost one in four family homes, according to one newspaper - precisely because they are the opposite of the past reviewers opinion - they are accessible, funny, very practical, and down to earth, and seem to be written from the heart. Biddulph has been around in Australia for about 20 years, and was brave enough to question the dogma about children being born genderless, and back this up with good science.
As a feminist, I find his book perfect because it helps me ACHIEVE those goals of raising my boy to be a great human being, but also to understand that he is not like me.
The three stages of boyhood are far from obvious, and I haven't seen them written elsewhere. But when you have a boy, you can see them at work and its a great help.
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