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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How and why "the craftsman mindset is the foundation for creating work you love"
Curious, I checked on the etymology of the word "career" and learned this: Origin in 1530s, "a running, course" (especially of the sun, etc., across the sky), from M.Fr. carriere "road, racecourse." Only centuries later (early 1800s), through the evolution of usage, did the word's meaning emerge as the "course of a working life." I mention all this because one of Cal...
Published on 26 Sept. 2012 by Robert Morris

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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars So Good You Get Paid To Do It
I like Cal's point that you'll get more satisfaction in your work by adopting a craftsman mindset than trying to find your paasion. This strikes me as good advice because there will be lots of times in your working life when it's a bit boring but you need to keep applying yourself because that's how you earn your money.

Unfortunately I thought the rest of the...
Published 20 months ago by Mr. Simon J. Harpham


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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How and why "the craftsman mindset is the foundation for creating work you love", 26 Sept. 2012
By 
Robert Morris (Dallas, Texas) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love (Paperback)
Curious, I checked on the etymology of the word "career" and learned this: Origin in 1530s, "a running, course" (especially of the sun, etc., across the sky), from M.Fr. carriere "road, racecourse." Only centuries later (early 1800s), through the evolution of usage, did the word's meaning emerge as the "course of a working life." I mention all this because one of Cal Newport's primary objectives is to help his reader select the most appropriate career course and remain on it while achieving near-, mid-, and long-term goals; then, if and whenever necessary, adjust the course, pace, and focus to accommodate unforeseen changes. Viewed as a journey, Newport also calls it a "career mission" that serves as "an organizing principle to your working life. It's what leads people to become famous for what they do and ushers in remarkable opportunities that come along with such fame."

Years ago during a commencement address at Stanford, Teresa Amabile urged the new graduates to do what they love and love what they do. I think that is excellent advice. I also agree with Newport that it is also very important to develop capabilities, skills that will "trump passion in the quest for work you love." That is why Newport focuses on what he calls "the craftsman mindset," one that focuses on what you can offer to the world. Unlike "the passion mindset" that focuses on what the world can offer you, the craftsman mindset "asks you to leave behind self-centered concerns about whether your job is `just right,' and instead put your head down and plug away at getting really damn good. No one owes you a great career, it argues; you need to earn it -- and the process won't be easy."

Here are a few of the dozens of passages that caught my eye:

o Rule #1: "Don't Follow Your Passion" (Pages 3-26)
o The Science of Passion: Three Conclusions (14-19)
o Craftsman Mindset vs. Passion Mindset (49-55)
o Rule #2: "Be So Good They Can't Ignore You" (29-101)
[Note: Newport explains that this comment was made by Steve Martin during an appearance on "The Charlie Rose Show."]
o "The Career Capital Theory of Great Work" (42-57)
o Rule #3: "Turn Down a Promotion/or Control" (105-143)
o "Control Traps" (115-131)
o "The Law of Financial Liability" (137-141)
o Rule #4: "Think Small, Act Big/The Importance of Mission" (147-197)

Newport devotes the final chapter to a brief but revealing discussion of his own "quest" to (a) answer the question, "How do people end up loving what they do?" and (b) obtain a faculty appointment at a university. He explains how he achieved both objectives. Near the end of the book, he observes, "Once you build up the career capital that these skills generate [and others value highly], invest it wisely. Use it to acquire control over what you do and how you do it, and to identify and act on a life-changing mission. This philosophy is less sexy than the fantasy of dropping everything to go live among the monks in the mountains, but it's also a philosophy that has been shown time and again to actually work."

No brief commentary such as mine can possibly do full justice to the scope and depth of the information, insights, and counsel that Cal Newport provides. However, I hope that those who read this review will have at least a sense of what his purposes are and how well he serves them. Presumably he agrees with me that it would be a fool's errand to attempt to act upon, immediately, all of his suggestions. Read strategically, highlight whichever passages are most important, formulate a "game plan," and then proceed with both determination and patience during your own journey of self-discovery. Bon voyage!
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars So Good You Get Paid To Do It, 4 Dec. 2013
By 
Mr. Simon J. Harpham "SleepyHead" (Sheffield, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love (Paperback)
I like Cal's point that you'll get more satisfaction in your work by adopting a craftsman mindset than trying to find your paasion. This strikes me as good advice because there will be lots of times in your working life when it's a bit boring but you need to keep applying yourself because that's how you earn your money.

Unfortunately I thought the rest of the book was a let-down that relied too much hindsight, generality and specious analysis.

So we need to acquire rare and valuable skills - OK so how do people decide which skills to acquire, which skills are rare and which rare skills are valuable? It's all very well saying "You need to acquire the skill to paint a masterpiece" but saying no more about how that acquisition might work in practice.

What happens if we make a career capital bet but our bets never pay off? Do we just go back to the start and try to find another set of skills? Do we try and take the skills we have elsewhere and make them fit? Cal doesn't have any answers besides the obvious.

Clearly there are people who have exceptional careers and some of what they have learned can be of benefit, but that doesn't mean everyone can be exceptional. What about those people who have unexceptional skills but who want to better themselves? Cal seems to be saying "Just keep practicing" but doesn't really have much else to say.

It's also not clear what Cal means by 'skill' other than 'something you get paid for'. But if you can get paid for flipping burgers, there's only so much of that you'll be able to do before you've mastered it. What then?

All in all then I would say the first couple of chapters are worth a quick read, but after that it's too vague to be of much practical use.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent advice for finding an enjoyable work life and career, 9 Nov. 2012
By 
K. Prygodzicz (London, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love (Paperback)
This book does clarify how one finds and develops an enjoyable worklife and career, and I would even go as far as to say it appears to offer a valuable new point of view as to how you should plan your working life.

Cal Newport says that people rarely have an initial passion for a particular type of work, and shows that work happiness only comes after following a particular sequence: In short he sets out four rules;

1. Do NOT 'follow your passion' unless you have all the skills needed and people are willing to pay enough for the results of your passion. Trying to do this without the necessary expertise and financial viability will only end in failure.

2. Develop your 'career capital'. This should be a rare and valuable skill which people are willing to pay for. You have to have a craftsman mindset, patiently toiling away and improving. This will often take years of hard work, but will allow you to exchange your skill to gain more control.

3. Once you have enough career capital and are at the cutting edge in the use of your skill, you can use this to gain more control of your working life: Cal warns of two 'control traps' - firstly leaving a job when you don't have enough career capital, and secondly staying in a job instead of leaving because your employer doesn't want you to go.

4. After you have control, you can find and develop your life's mission. To do this you have to look at the 'adjacent possible', that area beyond the cutting edge of your rare skill where your skill can be brought to innovative use. You have to 'think big and act small': This is done by shortlisting possible big innovative things to do with your skill, but then only making small initial gambles by trying each of them first in a relatively small way to see which one comes up best.
(It appears to me that in the 'adjacent possible' is the area in which new discovery and invention is possible through the use of the mastered skill, and the area in which most career satisfaction is to be obtained.)

Cal does use real life examples, and shows how he has used these rules in planning his worklife and career.

This book does appear to provide a new and valuable point of view about how to find an enjoyable form of work to fill your life and how to progress in that work.

The book is an easy read and can be read in a day. I wish I had read it 45 years ago when I was 11 years old.

An indispensable book for advisers/mentors (e.g. parents, teachers, professional career advisers), anyone at a turning point in their academic life (e.g. teenagers deciding what subjects to study for 'O' level, degree, PHD, MBA), anyone who needs advice on developing their worklife, and anyone thinking of giving up their day job to follow their passion.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars So Tenuous You Can Ignore It, 20 July 2014
By 
A. Wood (Derby, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love (Paperback)
I went into this book expecting to love it. It comes highly recommended by many people I admire. And I've long been sceptical of the lack of nuance of the "follow your passions" mantra. But as I read the book I got increasingly frustrated with it.

The biggest frustration was the complete lack of data or serious studies. The book focuses on anecdotes. Largely drawn from a narrow band of society. There are many of them but they don’t add up to evidence for his hypothesis.

And some of the anecdotes he chooses have to be twisted to fit into his hypothesis. Steve Jobs is used as an example many times in the book. The fact he spent much of his youth studying the liberal arts is used to debunk the idea he had a passion for technology. Yet Jobs often made it clear that his passion wasn’t for technology alone but for the point where technology and the liberal arts intersect.

And following your passion doesn’t mean following a direct route. Following your passion necessarily means taking a circuitous route. As Jobs said in his famous commencement speech, "Much of what I stumbled into by following my curiosity and intuition turned out to be priceless later on… you can't connect the dots looking forward, you can only connect them looking backwards."

Newport introduces the idea of the “craftsman mindset” with Jordan Tice practicing a guitar line for three hours every day for a month. There’s no doubt that this sort of dedication is the basis for stunning results. So what makes Jordan Tice so dedicate to practice? Newport’s response: "I really don't care why performers adopt the craftsman mindset."

He doesn’t care but he’s sure it isn’t passion. His evidence for this that performers have doubts about whether they’ve found their true calling. And this is the second big frustration I have with the book. His definition of passion is very narrow. He equates having passion with absolute certainty and self confidence. Whereas I see passion as having much more to do with following curiosity, inspiration and intuition.

I do think it’s high times that the “follow your passion” mantra has its flaws exposed and a more nuanced way is found. But it needs a better book than this to do it.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding!, 26 Oct. 2012
By 
Dr. J. W. Nicholson (London, UK) - See all my reviews
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This is one of the best career/lifestyle books I have ever read. It is well researched, and uses countless examples to show the way to a successful career and an interesting life. Above all, it brilliantly debunks the "follow your passion" mantra by showing that not even Steve Jobs followed it, despite what he said. Cal Newport gives numerous bits of evidence to show why it is such bad advice, including that students tend to be interesetd in things (sport, dancing) that can only rarely be the basis of careers and lifestyles. He also includes the horror story of the person who "followed her passion" into running a yoga school, and ended up on food stamps.

Having disposed of the myth, Cal Newport goes on the replace it with more solid advice, showing how you can become "... so good they can't ignore you". Also, very helpfully, he explains how he has applied the concept of "deliberate practice" to his own learning, with impressive results.

Overall, this is a really excellent book, and quite remarkable from one so near the beginning of his own career. On occasion, I thought the writing style was clumsy, but that is a minor issue. Much more important is the content, and that is superb. It ought to be compulsory reading for anyone involved in offering careers advice.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The sort of careers advice you wished you'd been given at school, 8 Oct. 2012
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This review is from: So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love (Paperback)
Short Review:

Superb careers and life advice. Get's straight to the point and demolishes the 'Follow Your Passion' careers advice.

Recommendation: Buy it.

Longer Review:

I absolutely love this book! And I loved it for challenging an opinion that I've had for many years. An opinion that was developed after years and years of hearing the cheesy old careers advice of "Find what your passions are in life and then follow your dreams and everything else will somehow work out..."

To be fair to those people - authors, family, friends, careers counsellors - were being very well meaning. Indeed, I've probably spouted the same lines to people I've offered careers advice to. The problem is, as Cal Newport explains in his excellent book, this is BAD advice.

Cal quickly gets to the point that, unfortunately, most of us don't have any burning career ambitions. Yes, there are a few rare individuals who do. Unfortunately the majority of us - myself included - didn't really know what to do with our lives when we were young. Yet we were told that this was not a problem. All we had to do, was 'dig deep' and uncover our (apparently hidden) passions. When we did this, somehow, everything else would be OK. By discovering our passions, we'd then be able to discover the most suitable work for us and our lives would be happy ever after.

Using a series of studies, and lots of anecdotes, Cal punctures this 'career passion' myth. And he does so with surgical precision. His writing style is precise and without waffle .

Once Cal has demolished the passion thing, he lays out, step-by-step, the process by which we can create a career path that offers real fulfilment and success.

I don't want to describe this process in too much detail in case you're tempted not to buy the book. However, in essence, Cal argues that, instead of expecting to be given amazing work from Day One in your career, you have to earn the right to be taken seriously. You do this by focusing on what people find rare and valuable and are willing to pay for. Keep providing superb value and force yourself (through a process of deliberate practice) to get better and better.

By working in a focused way, Cal argues that you'll quickly pull away from your peers. You'll stand out from the crowd so to speak.

Once you've achieved a certain level of career success, you'll have to work hard again to break out of the controls others will try and place on you. Only then will you be in a place where you can carve out your own career niche. Finally, at this point, you'll have the freedom to choose when, where and how you work. Not only that, but by this point, after several years of work experience, you'll probably have a much clearer idea of what it is you like to do i.e. you may have, indeed, discovered your passions by then!

Sounds like a lot of hard work? Yes, it is. Cal doesn't pull any punches here. Which, despite his young age, is a more mature approach than the wishful 'career passion' advocates.

As I see it, Cal's argument is that you need to take a long-term view. You need to understand not only WHAT you're trying to do with your career but HOW you're going to do it. He's pragmatic enough to explain that this process IS tough but, ultimately, highly rewarding.

Minor Criticisms

I've noticed on the Amazon.com site that a few reviewers have criticised Cal for being repetitive. I'd agree to an extent. He tends to rehearse his argument again and again throughout the book.

The reason I think he does so is because he's using a principle of learning that he talks about in his other work (he's written books on studying and learning) which is called, 'Active Recall'. This is where you revisit ideas in order to cement them into your memory. I didn't mind this approach but you may find it tiresome.

Other critics question whether Cal's approach would work for people who are not lucky enough to be well educated or, even, women (most of Cal's examples in his book are men).

Again, I recognise what these people are saying. But I think they're being unfair because success in life is more about attitude and behaviours than whether you've got lots of qualifications.

Yes, having a better start in life is a huge advantage. Coming from a poor, working-class background myself, these disadvantages can and often do cripple the desires and aspirations of millions.

Nevertheless, as Cal's book points out, if you believe you're in charge of your destiny, and work both hard and smart, you'll eventually be so good, they can't ignore you :)

Good luck!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Refreshing Perspective on Career Advice, 28 July 2013
This review is from: So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love (Paperback)
Ask someone for career advice and they will more often than not tell you something along the lines of, "follow your passion" or "do what you love and the money will follow". On the surface these statements seem reasonable but they can also be superficial if they are not balanced with the other side to the coin - that is, passion can grow after you become really good at something first.

And this is why I really enjoyed Cal Newport's book, So Good They Can't Ignore You. The book provides a refreshing perspective on career advice and kicks off by debunking the passion myth with rule number 1: "Don't Follow Your Passion". Below are some of the key takeaways from the book.

Rule #1 - Don't Follow Your Passion:

The idea that we are born with a preset, genetic love for something - maths, music, dance, business - is questionable. Michael Phelps and Usain Bolt were born with genetic advantages that help them excel in their sports. But one has to wonder, were they born with a natural love for their swimming/running or did they come to love the sport after winning lots of junior competitions and realising they had the potential to be great athletes?

In the book, Cal Newport uses Steve Jobs' career path as an example. We all think it was rooted in a natural-born passion for technology but it had more twists and turns than one would expect. Check out the first chapter of Newports book or Steve Jobs' biography for more on this.

Rule #2 - Be So Good They Can't Ignore You:

Following on from rule #1, Newport argues that "passion is a side effect of mastery". The question of careers then, should not just be about searching for the one love you were born with. Instead, you should look around to see what interests you enough to invest time to become really good at it. And if you become good at something (especially if the skill is rare and valuable), you just might find the passion you were looking for.

Rule #3 - Financial Viability:

A good career should enable you to make a decent living. You don't want to worry about money in modest matters (e.g. shelter, clothes, food, holidays) and it is no surprise that Newport urges one to consider the financial viability of whatever career path they choose. Newport goes on to write:

"When deciding whether to follow an appealing pursuit that will introduce more control in your work life, seek evidence of whether people are willing to pay for it. If you find this evidence, continue. If not, move on." (Page 139)

Rule #4 - Little Bets (Think Small, Act Big):

How do you know if a certain career is worth pursuing? What are your chances of doing well at it? How much should you invest in it? These are all questions Newport advices you can answer with the help of little bets.

Little bets are when Chris Rock does 40 to 50 sets at small comedy clubs to figure out which jokes work well and which ones don't. Little bets are when an Archaeologist professor does an amateur documentary for his students, which later helps them land a job as a TV host for an archaeology show.

In sum, Newport advices:

"To maximise your chances of success, you should deploy small, concrete experiments that return concrete feedback. For Chris Rock, such a bet might include telling a joke to an audience and seeing if they laugh, whereas for Kirk [the archaeologist mentioned above], it might mean producing sample footage for a documentary and seeing if it attracts funding. These bets allow you to tentatively explore the specific avenues surrounding your general mission, looking for those with the highest likelihood of leading to outstanding results." (Page 181)

The book details the above ideas in much more depth than my 600 words could, so if you have career questions and like the sound of Cal Newport's ideas, be sure to grab yourself a copy of the book!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great book that gives you reasonable information and examples for the moves that you do for your job, 17 Oct. 2012
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This review is from: So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love (Paperback)
I just finished reading this book with having enlightenment for myself. It helps you figure out your own life without questioning each detail to lead to an exact purpose of your life. And when you are at a point where you started being miserable by judging yourself and blaming not to have a real passion for your work, this book really gives pretty much reasonable information about how to enjoy your work without forcing yourself to focus on one passion and motivate yourself to take a further step. Even in some examples you can see yourself in dilemmas and confusing the terms passion and interest. And it really turns out to be great to understand these steps and the reasons beneath it without risking your life and taking each step carefully and with little bets. I will read this book again to emphasize and make it as a habit. If you have not found the passion for your work, your life is not a disaster and even you can create your own passion in each step you take. It is all related with your moves and the way you think. So this will definitely add value to the ones like me. One of the greatest books I have ever read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Necessary but not sufficient, 22 Feb. 2015
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For this kind of book to be successful several different objectives have to be achieved. Firstly there has to be a strong narrative and this is certainly achieved here. To create a strong and convincing narrative however it has to be supported by evidence. Evidence can be of different types and included here is evidence from research, from case studies i.e. interviews with individuals, and from personal experience. Clearly to support an argument that is generalised as a truth, in this case about career development and achieving work that you love, the evidence should be strong and consistent.
Different kinds of evidence add more or less support to the narrative. Clearly research studies with a randomised large sample size and a well-constructed design can be seen to add most if the results are statistically significant. Single case studies, i.e. information gained from one or two individuals is much less weighty. The personal narrative is if anything the least convincing as it is subject to the clear bias of wanting to confirm the hypothesis or argument All the evidence is subject to this bias however in terms of selection (and exclusion) of particular evidence and the interpretation of the findings.
I enjoyed reading this book and felt it was important enough to treat it seriously so I read it again more carefully. I found the argument against making career choices on the basis of passion convincing and really felt Cal was pointing to something very important, but there are points in the argument that leave me uneasy. Firstly the choice of Steve Jobs as an example of how a career develops does not seem to support the main thesis does not seem to support the main contention . The core idea in the book is that you have to develop career capital, that is that you have to be able to demonstrate, show to others that you have the ability and skills that are of value. Having read biographies of Jobs and supported by what Cal says in this book, it does not seem that at this point in his career he had any substantial amount of career capital at all. The critical event which “he stumbled into” was the meeting with Paul Terrell of the Mountain View computer store. It was the idea that Terrell had of selling fully assembled computers that really started the process towards Apple. Where in this is Jobs using his career capital? Clearly he was what we now know he could do and that is able to spot opportunities. This was a concatenation of circumstances that he seized hold of, not the result of a long incubation of career capital. At this point in time it is doubtful that he even had the necessary technical ability and knowledge to make this break on his own, clearly relying on Steve Wozniack for this form of capital. I agree with the point made though that he did not do this because he was passionate, that came after the fact of the founding of Apple. This whole episode seems much more a matter of chance than perhaps the hypothesis of the book allows, and chance is important in career development.
Another instance where I think the evidence does not clearly support the conclusions is the interpretation of the work of Wrzesniewski. By collecting data from a large sample of subjects (196 people) the authors generated a plethora of relationships between different characteristics e.g job satisfaction and the respondents view of their work (job, career, calling). The most obvious point to make about all this is that these relationships are correlational rather than causative, i.e. it is impossible to say that, for example, that the respondents view of the job caused their feelings of job satisfaction to be higher or lower, the causality could work the other way. This is a notorious problem in the Social Sciences and is well recognised but often ignored in the interpretation of results where there tends to be an inflation of the significance of these results. When it comes to the subgroup of administrative assistants the problem becomes worse. The authors of the research recognise that here the numbers are too low, at 24 respondents, for any valid statistical operations to be carried out, and the number within the “calling” group of administrative assistants comes down to 9. This means that the “results” are based on little more than educated intuitions coming from the data. Interestingly as I said, the authors pay lip service to this limitation but then go on to claim that the results have “heuristic” value, i.e. they make you think! Cal on the other hand takes this data to support his hypothesis and this is not legitimate. Apart from the numbers issue and the correlation/causation issue there are many other possible explanations for the correlation between greater happiness and the time in the job, for example self-selection issues, and the view of the job. This does not give Cal the right to say that this is evidence against the “passion” theory.
Finally a comment of a different sort. Concepts such as career capital, deliberate practice and the craftsmen mindset are good antidotes to the “want it enough and it will happen” school of mystical thinking and remarkability hints at the competitive nature of the job market. The argument that Cal puts forwards seems to say though, that if you develop career capital to a sufficient extent you will naturally shine brighter than other people who are competing for the same job slots, slots that have characteristics that are quite rare in the actual job market. This seems to me to miss out a significant set of processes within the job selection process, namely the social and its subclass the political. While it may be true for a few people that garnering sufficient career capital is sufficient to achieve, for most people this will not be possible. To differentiate yourself in this way is virtually impossible for many and although the idea of seeking to achieve this is (possibly) a good one it is not for many realistic. Even if this is possible, the access to these positions that provide these sought –after conditions is fraught with other obstacles. In academia in particular the knowledge that spreads from one speciality to another is relatively small; they are bounded areas of discourse. So when the appointment of someone to a professorship is contemplated many of the decision makers will be ignorant of the speciality and therefore not really in a position to make the sort of judgement that Cal’s version of the universe would require. Quite properly when this occurs, the decision makers may take soundings from within the general academic community and within the speciality community. This is unlikely to be a very thorough process into the social realm of reputation and standing. Universities for example, are notoriously political environments where power and influence are critical to the decisions made. This is not the kind of rational process that Cal’s model requires. I would therefore suggest an additional process that is vitally important to achieving the desired outcome and that is the accumulation of social capital i.e. critical relationships with key decision makers. Although the processes to achieve this overlap with those involved with career capital , they are not the same. Making these relationships will also I think increase the rate of happy “accidents”.
I hope it is obvious that I enjoyed this book. It gave me much food for thought and it is because it may be very influential that it deserves a critical review in the best sense of that word. I would suggest you read it but retain your critical faculties when understanding and absorbing the message.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Extraordinarily Useful, 5 Nov. 2012
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This review is from: So Good They Can't Ignore You: Why Skills Trump Passion in the Quest for Work You Love (Paperback)
The most extraordinarily useful book I have ever read tackling the scourge of the modern working man - career/work angst. A paradigm shift highlighting brilliant insights and tools to rethink work and careers. Over the past four years I have become very interested in the implications of the research carried out by K. Anders Ericsson, Professor of Psychology at Florida State University, on expertise and expert performance. For me his work was first highlighted in Malcolm Gladwell's Outliers followed by Geoff Colvin's Talent is Overrated and finally Daniel Coyle's excellent The Talent Code. Cal Newport's book further develops this theme to cover the world of work and careers. He points out that work becomes great and enjoyable only when you get really, really good at it i.e. the passion will follow the expertise gained in your particular field of work. Personally it has forced me to look at my current work (I am an accountant) in a new light. Cal's insights have introduced more vigour and dynamism into my current role. I have stopped thinking the grass is greener on the other side. There is a better way but Cal shows it's not the `Passion' myth you have been previously led to believe.
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