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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
such a good book. ellefson is an inspirational man. he really changed his life around
Published 1 month ago by Amazon Customer

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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Another tedious McIver tome
I was looking forward to this, as McIver had worked with Dave Elleffson on this, as opposed to cobbling together reports from google as was done for the Machine Head book. However, after a few chapters, I was bored. There is no real insight into Dave or his playing; in fact there is no real depth about the development of Megadeth and the input into classic albums such...
Published 18 months ago by kendall


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Another tedious McIver tome, 28 Dec. 2013
This review is from: My Life With Deth : Discovering Meaning in a Life of Rock & Roll (Hardcover)
I was looking forward to this, as McIver had worked with Dave Elleffson on this, as opposed to cobbling together reports from google as was done for the Machine Head book. However, after a few chapters, I was bored. There is no real insight into Dave or his playing; in fact there is no real depth about the development of Megadeth and the input into classic albums such as Peace Sells, Rust in Peace etc.

The basic premise is - Learn Bass, Drink a bit, move to LA, meet Dave Mustaine, become an addict, find god, become sober.

Lazy writing overall, this could have been good.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars David, Please Don't Write Another One!, 31 Dec. 2013
This review is from: My Life With Deth : Discovering Meaning in a Life of Rock & Roll (Hardcover)
As a big fan of Megadeth, and Ellefson in particular, it was inevitable that several copies of this book would turn up in my life. I don't go out of my way to buy "celebrity" biographies because, as Ellefson points out at the beginning of his book, these biographies are a dime a dozen and all contain the same tragic story. Once you've read one, you've read 'em all.

Secondly, I hate giving negative reviews of books. I'm of the opinion that if someone's poured their heart and soul into something then they deserve some kind of recognition. However, there is no heart and soul in this book and nothing jumped out to make me feel anything toward the man I looked up during my own struggles with drugs.

Ellefson also starts his book with "At first I didn't want to write this book". Nothing screams "MONEY GRAB!" more than "Well, I didn't want to do this, but..."

Unfortunately, it doesn't get much better and Ellefson's attitude to not wanting to write the story of his life shines through because the story of a whirlwind 30-year career in music is crammed into just 188 pages (The final pages are made up of a discography, an index, and a thanks section. Do biographies really need an index?!). Sadly, because of the length of this edition, I get the feeling that this isn't the last "biography" we'll be seeing from Ellefson.

Right from the start, you get the feeling that Ellefson didn't want to be doing this. The first few chapters just read like a bunch of notes. There's no substance to it and I don't feel myself connecting with him. And the amount of time a sentence is started with "I did", or "I had", or "I believe", or just "I" in general shows for some very sloppy writing and editing. Tragically it also applies to the language used in the book. While I realise this was written by an American, the ghost writer (Joel McIver) is British and should have picked up on the use of words like "Mono". Mono isn't an illness here in the UK, or the rest of the world for that matter. To put it into English that the rest of the world can understand, Mono is better known as glandular fever.

The same goes for the tech speak which litters the book. For those of us who aren't musicians, this is a book best read with Google open because you'll find yourself stopping and starting to trying and piece it together. On the flip side, he tells musicians to start putting bands together at eighteen while they have no responsibilities, which is yet another generalisation by someone who hasn't lived in the real world for the past 30+ years. You get the feeling that Ellefson has some real insecurities issues regarding his job. He's constantly going on about how the internet/radio/TV/people in general have ruined the music industry. Which only adds up to giving you the impression that he's scared of other bands coming along and finally finishing off Megadeth.

And don't get me started on the quotes which started every chapter. Each one (other than the Biblical passages) is listed as "Anonymous". Yet a quick internet search would have thrown up who each one was credited to.

I don't need the lewd stories of a musician's life and thankfully Ellefson's story is fairly free of those. It's not because I'm a prude but because once you've read one rock star's life story you've read them all. Yes, you took a bunch of drugs. Yes, you had a lot of sex. So have millions of other people around the world. There's no need to pad out a biography with several hundred pages of exactly identical sex stories and I'm glad that Ellefson didn't go down that route. But, as with any junkie, their life is ruled by the drugs which may also account for why this book is so short. Not being able to remember the night before coupled with the same thing happening again and again (as they tend to do in drug addicts lives with the Get high/get withdrawals/get high/get withdrawals routine) make for a really boring story.

Throughout the book, Ellefson misses some brilliant chances to tell stories. Instead he gives them a fleeting, single sentence glance before going on to talk about who he was sleeping with at the time, what equipment he was using, or how many drugs he was taking. The lawsuits between himself and Mustaine is something a lot of fans want to know about. Yet it gets a paragraph. While I understand that Ellefson wants to move on, he also has to understand that those who've supported him all these years will want to know about such events. Fobbing them off with brief, and often inane, excuses is sloppy and lazy. Considering this is billed as his BIOGRAPHY, there's not a lot to go on, especially for long term fans of the band. I also know this is supposed to be some kind of inspirational "How Not To Do The Music Industry (Or, If You Do, How To Survive It)" book but sadly it's been done far better and far more in depth by other people.

Unfortunately, the entire tone of the book makes Ellefson seem ungrateful of his position in life. He moans about not being on the road, and then moans that he's not getting any sleep because of his kids. Hello?!?! Welcome to the real world where 99% of us have to get up at the crack of dawn to go to work so that we can feed our kids and keep roofs over our heads. A lot of us don't have the luxury of getting a lie in and starting our working day at 10am, 11am, or even mid-day. Rather than coming across as the "nice one" of Megadeth, Ellefson sadly appears to have picked up Mustaine's habit of whining about everything and anything. At no point did he come across as "nice" or the "diplomat" (as he likes to remind everyone at least once a chapter). The constant repetition of who he is (David Ellefson - band diplomat and second in charge), what he does (plays bass in Megadeth), and who he plays with (20+ people over the band's history to date, plus various side projects while he was away from Megadeth) weren't needed and seemed to only be there to try and pad out an already slender volume.

Ellefson also spends time talking about how people should be happy with their lot in life. I'm not sure that the homeless, starving, and destitute would agree with him and is another example of how he's not in touch with the real world.

This book can't decide if it's a biography, a technical manual for musicians, a coffee table book of nice comments from Ellefson's friends, a love letter to his wife and family, or an "inspirational" book (which is one of the genres it was marketed as, yet I'm having a lot of trouble finding it). Overall, it feels rushed, forced, and devoid of any real emotion. For anyone who's been a fan of the band for any length of time, there's no new information. Most of what's in the book can be found in various interviews and articles, all of which are freely available on You Tube and various music sites.

I know all of these issues may be minor but when coupled together it makes for an irritating and jarring reading experience.

David, I love and respect you and adore what you've done with your life. You've been a great inspiration during my own dark days of addiction and cleaning up. However, thanks to this, my respect of you has plummeted to an all time low. I'm sad that you did this, sad that you rushed it out, and sad that you so obviously didn't proof read it to see the tone of voice you came over with. Please don't write another of these books. If you want to write another, please go and update the absolutely excellent "Making Music Your Business" for the 21st century. And write the next one yourself as working with another writer hasn't done you any favours.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointed by this book from one of my favourite musicians, 4 Jan. 2014
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I have been a Megadeth fan since the eighties & always had huge respect for David Ellefson but I found this book a bit boring if I'm honest. Most of the book explores David's faith & teaching of a religious nature, I feel he has held back on some of the true tales of his life to not upset the Apple cart which is a real shame. He's a super talented guy
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good read but some parts of the book didn't appeal, 12 Feb. 2014
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On the whole, I enjoyed reading the book. Dave is clearly smarter than is given credit for. I particularly enjoyed his perceptive insights on his career and on dave mustaine. Without junior to balance out mustaine, megadeth wouldn't have achieved as much as they have. I also really enjoyed the tone of the book.

As I am not particularly religious, I found the latter sections, where daves religious beliefs take a more prominent role, a bit of a drag. I'm all for finding spiritually but I have to confess some of the latter sections didn't really resonate with me. I also found it fascinating to learn how maturity and life circumstances in general play a role in the evolution of a musician. Most interesting.

All in all, good job dave. You come across well and your passion for life and music are there for all to see.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 15 May 2015
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Amazon Customer (virginia water, surrey, england) - See all my reviews
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such a good book. ellefson is an inspirational man. he really changed his life around
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected, 7 Jan. 2014
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I've read a few of the 'metal rock star of the 80s' biographies in the last couple of years and I generally love them - someone's life story with the cast of characters being your metal heroes of the 80s ... what could be better?

Out of all of them, this one had a real message for me.

I am not religious in any way and knew nothing about David Ellefson and Christianity before this book. However, upon finishing the book, I found that it had changed my mind in some way ... prior to reading the book, I'd felt that religion was very un-metal and for old people in a church ... probably a view I'd picked up in my younger days when watching church folk burning metal LPs and accusing bands of devil worship.

I'm not deciding to convert or anything, but the book validated the idea that actually religion can be for anyone and that people who go to church or follow their own religious path can come from any walk of life.
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5.0 out of 5 stars he enjoyed it, 7 April 2015
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This review is from: My Life With Deth : Discovering Meaning in a Life of Rock & Roll (Hardcover)
Bought for my son , he enjoyed it
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars David Ellefson - My Life With Deth, 24 Mar. 2014
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This review is from: My Life With Deth : Discovering Meaning in a Life of Rock & Roll (Hardcover)
Great book, from a great man and fantastic bass player.
Great perspective of the man behind the music. MEGA DETH!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a unique rock biography, 7 Jun. 2014
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Was great to get an insight into one of my favourite bands megadeth and Dave comes across as a super nice guy.
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