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on 1 August 2012
I have found the recent Typhon Pact releases to be underwhelming, interesting stories but nothing that really grabbed me. This one on the other hand shook me hard all night long. Great to finally return to DS9 after the books having been strangely absent from their for several years.

This, and its sequel, are some of the best Trek fiction for a very long time.

The last line of this book, I had to re-read it a dozen times. Took my breath away and made my heart stop. Best Trek cliffhanger ever, beats Best Of Both Worlds Pt 1 and "Fire" in my opinion.
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TOP 50 REVIEWERon 20 December 2014
I haven’t read a Star Trek novel for a while, and decided to dive back into them part way through the Section 31 novels set in the Star Trek universe. Section 31 is a shady organisation involved in Federation intelligence and defence operations and often operates outside the norms of usual law agencies. A number of Section 31 novels have been written, set in all Star Trek arenas, from Original Series, Enterprise, Next Generation, Voyage, and the latest five being set in the Deep Space Nine arena.

I have picked up the novels from this book, published first in June 2012, which is contined in Typhon Pact – Raise the Dawn. The Section 31 novels then continue with The Fall – A Ceremony of Losses, and Section 31: Disavowed (published December 2014).

This novel feels like it has a cast of thousands. For the first 12 chapters or more every chapter seems to be in a different place in a different Empire or part of an Empire, with a different group of beings, all with very different purposes. So it takes concentrated reading to ensure you don’t get lost in the story before it’s even really got going. But the story is enthralling enough to ensure your attention doesn’t wander, as you get taken from the Romulan Empire to the Tzenkethi world, see the Breen, back to Deep Space Nine, on to the Enterprise, back to Captain Sisko’s command, and much more. The Typhon Pact races are aligning themselves against the United Federation of Planets, and there is a lot of juggling for supremacy, with some pushing for war, and others trying to keep a balance of power. The setup does take quite a lot of time as you work through the political and cultural differences between the races and the two main sides in this struggle, before we find ourselves building up to the very abrupt and surprising ending of the book – to be continued in Typhon Pact – Raise the Dawn.

There’s a lot of writing in this book, a lot of scene setting, a lot of world building, a lot of people and beings and descriptions to take in while there’s not a huge amount of action. But it’s all done in such a way as to be highly engaging and very interesting reading, and I look forward to the next in the series.
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on 14 June 2012
First of all I would like to say how happy i was that the novels were heading back to Deep Space Nine and her crew as since the series "Season 8" selection of books we really havnt seen much of them recently

This story also takes place within the gamma quadrant with the enterprise and its romulan counterparts.Without giving to much away - this is were i think the story falls a little short. David has wrote a lot of DS9 storys and knows the characters very well and he writes them with ease however the TNG characters seemed to have lost there personality and in some cases there voices - i cant help but feel if David Mack or James Swallow had wrote this the characters would been more consistent with previous novels

However as i said above David does DS9 very well and as much of this takes place on the station its a very easy read, and i cant wait for the follow up book to this which is out next month ( which is nice of pocket books - they tend to schedule these things preety badly) Star Trek: Typhon Pact: Raise the Dawn especially beacuse of those last fateful words of the book.

" And then Deep Space Nine"..........

shall i spoil it for you ..... naaaaaaa - get this now
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on 16 September 2012
I cannot put it forward for the book of the century award, but it does its job of providing a little light reading which did not end up half read and abandoned :)
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on 27 June 2012
David R George III continues the post-Nemesis Star Trek saga in this first part of a duology and sixth part in the ongoing Typhon Pact arc. The narrative covers the period around the earlier novels, adding some context to tie them together, then continues the adventures of the Next Gen and Deep Space Nine characters as the Federation opens diplomatic relations with the Typhon Pact.

In common with George's other Trek novels, the focus is quite broad and the book longer than many recent entries in the series, meaning that the text in my paperback copy is smaller than is often the case. Rather than following an individual character, George's narrative flits around taking in the diverse lives of Picard, Kira, Bashir etc, while focusing mainly on Sisko and surprisingly Ro Laren, as well as a number of the new characters introduced in the novels.

Some readers will find the book frustrating in the way the story is told from myriad points of view. I know a number of Star Trek fans are not enamoured of George's style, but I like it - it certainly isn't a character piece, but the breadth of the tale doesn't weaken the storytelling and certainly makes for an epic tale.

I've really enjoyed catching up with the Deep Space Nine characters again and am really looking forward to the continuation of this story in Raise the Dawn.
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on 2 June 2012
Although this book does cover some old ground from the other Typhon Pact books, once the new story comes into play, it will have you hooked. Whats more is the one hell of a cliff hanger end... Wow! While some of the other Typhon Pact books have not been up there with the 'Destiny' Trilogy, this one makes up for that, with hope for whats to come. I for one can't wait for the next book!
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on 20 June 2012
Weaving the events of the other four Typhon Pacts together, "Plagues of Night" brings Deep Space 9 back to the centre of Star Trek politics in the Star Trek universe. Sisko gets to take his new ship on a voyage of exploration, while dealing with the actions he took in "Rough Beasts of Empire", Ro Laren comes into her own as commanding office of DS9 and Spock temporarily joins the Enterprise-E crew. "Plagues of Night" also introduces several new DS9 characters, the most intriguing is Commander Blackmer, the security chief of the station.

he only drawback of the novel for me was Worf - I don't really read the new TNG novels, but his role as first officer of the Enterprise seems to have diluted his character somewhat.
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on 6 February 2016
Recommended, very well written book and indeed the entire series is.
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on 5 December 2012
Its something of a clunky read, with page after page analysing each character's life and choices, and past actions. Normal for a book, but in this one, after a while, you're begging to read some actual dialogue.

Still, its DS9, so that helps....and boy oh boy, WHAT a cliffhanger! The title of this review sums up the final line of the book.
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on 1 August 2012
About a third of the way into the first part of the DS9 Typhon Pact duology, I gave up and read "Raise the Dawn" instead. After enjoying that book far more, I went back and read this story, and curiously, got on a little better.

The trouble I have with David R George III's novels- and this included the earlier novel, "Rough Beasts of Empire"- is that his writing is horribly slow and cluttered. The prose can be rich, but seemingly after every other line there's at least paragraph explaining a) why a character feels a certain way, b) a reminiscence of an event, and c) a separate reference to a previous novel. And this goes on ALL THE TIME. Not only does is drag out the story (and the page count) but it's appallingly unrealistic. It's the voice of the author in the guise of the character, and it's painfully unnecessary.

Writing style aside, the book isn't too bad. It goes over the events of the 4-part "Typhon Pact" miniseries from different perspectives, and sets up the plotline of the Typhon Pact obsessively trying to gain Slipstream Drive. Worth a read, but aside from literally the very last line of the book, you could skip this and proceed to the snappier, more involving part 2- "Raise the Dawn".

One last thing: is modern Trek trying to be oh-so-politically-correct on us these days? In a seeming effort to combat the thoughtless sexism of the old series' 1960's values, we have a female Federation leader, a female Cardassian leader, and a female Romulan leader (who is also a lesbian.) Not very coincidentally, they are the major powers of the books. Are men out of favour?
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