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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars People need food, not faith
This extremely hard-hitting book throws a very shrill light on world and Catholic affairs, firmly in the grip of wealthy ultra-conservative forces capable of influencing directly Papal elections and of even killing an elected Pope.
Lucien Gregoire gives an impressive in depth portrait of Albino Luciani (Pope John Paul I), his outspoken and for the Moral Establishment...
Published on 27 Aug. 2011 by Luc REYNAERT

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7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars fishy unfortunately
Has it struck anyone else as unusual that there are currently no less than 38 (!) 5-star Reviews for this book ? Many of the names of these enthusiastic reviewers have an unreal ring to them and almost half of them conclude in just the same way: by highly recommending the other title by Mr.Gregoire ! (Is something a bit funny going on ?)

This Pope was an...
Published on 18 Aug. 2012 by S. Ramsey-Hardy


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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars People need food, not faith, 27 Aug. 2011
By 
Luc REYNAERT (Beernem, Belgium) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Murder in the Vatican: The CIA and the Bolshevik Pontiff (Paperback)
This extremely hard-hitting book throws a very shrill light on world and Catholic affairs, firmly in the grip of wealthy ultra-conservative forces capable of influencing directly Papal elections and of even killing an elected Pope.
Lucien Gregoire gives an impressive in depth portrait of Albino Luciani (Pope John Paul I), his outspoken and for the Moral Establishment alarming world view, his mighty ambition, his death and the network of the murderers.

Albino Luciani
Albino Luciani's cardinal ambition was to rid the world of poverty. He attacked frontally the wealthy (`it is the right of no man to accumulate wealth beyond the necessary while other men starve to death because they have nothing'). In this fight against poverty faith has no place, because it `doesn't `know right from wrong'. People should be given food not faith. During his life, A. Luciani didn't build one single church, but forty-four orphanages.
A cardinal issue for the Church is sex. For Pope John Paul I, `we have made sex the greatest of sins, whereas in itself it is nothing more than human nature and not a sin at all.' In the battle against poverty A. Luciani supported contraception. The ban of contraception by the Catholic Church was `the driving force behind the spread of disease, poverty and starvation.' For him, `Mother Church should cease to be the cause of many of the world's problems and begin to answer them.'
What he also wanted was peace, not war: `The most fundamental weapon of war is propaganda which conditions children of nations to hate children of other nations so that when they grow up they will kill each other for the few at the top.'

Enemies, death and the aftermath
For the cynical, hypocritical (war, but no condoms) pro-life extremists, like K. Wojtyla or J. Ratzinger, the murder of John Paul I was a holy thing to do, because for them he was a (sperm + egg) baby killer.
Outside the Church, Italy was in the ban of the Historic Compromise, `an engine of destruction of all moral values' for K. Wojtyla.
L. Gregoire comes to the same conclusion as D. Yallop in his book `In God's Name': the P2 network killed John Paul I, probably by a lethal injection. There was no autopsy and the body was embalmed immediately in order to hide the truth. The Pauper Pope and Liberation Theology were dead.
The new Pope, K. Wojtyla, had been a scrutinizer of the voting process when A. Luciani was elected, together with Cardinal J. Suenens (who was also murdered). After his election, he launched a short list of very strange promotions, with J. Ratzinger among the chosen ones. Dangerous prime witnesses of the murder and also of other shady deals within the Vatican (the Banco Ambrosiano scandal) all died rather mysteriously in a short timespan.

This devastating book exposes a most terrible image of the Catholic Church with deadly infighting in order to become the `representative of God' on this small planet and to guarantee that the `right' gospel will be propagated.
It is a must read for all those interested in world affairs.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Muder in the Vatican - A Critique, 19 Jan. 2011
This review is from: Murder in the Vatican: The CIA and the Bolshevik Pontiff (Paperback)
Lucien Gregoire must be one of the bravest authors alive today. His book is divided into two major sections: the first is a biography of Albino Luciani. Parts of this biography are deeply personal and highly authoritative, since the author was known to a priest, who was personal assistant to Luciani when the latter was bishop of Vittorio Veneto, and who was, himself, killed 'mafia-style', by a high-speed hit-and-run driver outside St Peter's, just hours after the death of his former master. I urge you to spend time with Lucien and Father Jack, in the glorious setting of Vittorio Veneto: the picture is touching and intimate, and has much to teach of this saintly man who was to become John Paul I.

The biography is absolutely vital to a complete understanding of the second part of the book: the investigation into the suspicious sudden death of John Paul I. It uses his biographical backgrond to reveal why Albino Luciani posed such a huge threat to the Roman curia, politically and (more importantly for the Church)theologically. And it is the theological explanation as to a motive for his murder which renders this book so very much more satisfactory to the Christian reader (like myself) than is the Yallop account.

Gregoire has been meticulous in his researches; and has compiled a list of all those with similar political/ theological views to those of Luciani, who also met untimely and suspicious deaths in the late Seventies. Did you know, for instance, that Paul VI may have been poisoned? Or the young and vital Russian Orthodox Patriarch of Leningrad, who died in the Pope's arms, having drunk coffee in his presence? Were you aware of the threats to the life of the great Belgian Primate, Leon Joseph Suenens. The list includes Cardinals, Bishops, Swiss Guards, Nuns, and secretaries and assistants; as well as those of the criminal underworld and the grim Propaganda Due Masonic Lodge.

This book will change your view of a great many people: so prepare to be shocked. I have always been angry with Paul VI for 'Humanae Vitae': but my mind has been changed, having read Gregoire's account of the role such a document was designed to play in ensuring the succession of Luciani to the Chair of Peter. And for those currently contemplating the canonisation of John Paul II, Gregoire's book has a message, too. If carried through, this may be one of the Roman Catholic Church's most collossal blunders. Better to canonise his predecessor.

Perhaps the supreme irony revealed in the book, however, is a simple little secret which goes a long way to explaining the threat posed by Luciani to the power-filled and money-obsessed. In chosing his papal name, along with a great many others, I had always imagined he was expressing continuity with John XXIII and Paul VI. Perhaps, but the man who was himself admired above all, save Christ, by Luciani was his own father: a simple, poor Italian atheist and communist, called Giovanni Paulo Luciani.

Finally a word must be said about the language. Attention needs to be paid to the style and occasional 'howler' in the text. It is also written in an annoying number of fonts. But do not let these facts deter you from reading this book. There are very few texts which can truly claim to be life-affecting: but Lucien Gregoire's account of the wonderful life, and dreadful death of Albino Luciani may be one of them.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Complete, 24 Jun. 2011
This review is from: Murder in the Vatican: The CIA and the Bolshevik Pontiff (Paperback)
This is the only complete record of this good man's mysterious death and the role the Vatican bank played in it.

Whereas other books speak in generalities and innuendos, the bio includes the author's personal encounters with the pope when the latter was a bishop and the record of the press that recorded this pope's every move from the time he became a bishop in 1958 until he was found dead in his bed in 1978.

The author goes so far as to reprint the actual court transcripts which tried the bank scandal, detailing each of the multi-million dollar transfers from the Vatican bank to Central America where it eventually disappeared in Nicaragua (Contras). Appropriately tabbed 'The Vatican-Contra Affair' in the book.

If you're interested in fairytales look elsewhere. If you're interested in history, this is your book.

Though this is basically a biography - to my knowledge the only one uncensored by the Vatican - the author does a convincing job proving the conspiracy that planned the Great Vatican Bank scandal was a part of the same conspiracy that planned the Murder of John Paul I.

This book has been republished in an expanded edition: The Vatican Murders: The Life and Death of John Paul I . I would suggest clicking on 'look inside' on the Kindle version of the new edition.
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7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars fishy unfortunately, 18 Aug. 2012
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This review is from: Murder in the Vatican: The CIA and the Bolshevik Pontiff (Paperback)
Has it struck anyone else as unusual that there are currently no less than 38 (!) 5-star Reviews for this book ? Many of the names of these enthusiastic reviewers have an unreal ring to them and almost half of them conclude in just the same way: by highly recommending the other title by Mr.Gregoire ! (Is something a bit funny going on ?)

This Pope was an unforgettable figure, as nearly everyone alive at the time knows. He made an immediate and vivid impression of warmth, sincerity, modesty, and humour. He only reigned for 33 days and I happened to be in Rome for most of them, I saw him and went to his Inaugural Mass at St.Peter's (I carefully preserved the ticket.) It's impossible to forget this man, and it is very unfortunate that his shining memory has now become so clouded by theories about his sudden death, which was such a terrible shock.

David Yallop's book about this Pope's supposed 'murder' was highly effective, well researched, and in many ways convincing. And then along came John Cornwell's study, with the backing of the Vatican, and he too is convincing as he completely demolishes the murder thesis. As J.J.Norwich put it recently, you don't know what to believe about the death of Pope John Paul I.

I bought this current book in the hope it might shed some light on the situation. In my view it does the opposite. The book is partly a biography, and it proceeds to put a lot of words into the mouth and thoughts into the mind of this Pope which don't appear to be sufficiently supported by the evidence. There are also political assessments and interpretations which are on the dodgy side, together with alarming errors of fact.

During the first few pages we are introduced to the author's close friend Jack Champneys, and a chatty 1978 letter to the author from 'Jack' on grand Vatican writing paper is reproduced, full-page, like an endorsement. We are also told that Jack was formerly secretary to "the Archbishop of Vittorio Veneto"(?), that he was well-placed in the Vatican close to the Pope -and that he was killed in suspicious circumstances by a hit & run driver shortly after the Pope's death.

Getting knocked down trying to cross the road in Rome is hardly a suspicious event. But where else can I read about this significant individual 'Jack', his important place in the Vatican, and reports of his hit & run murder ?? Apparently, nowhere else, and his existence is unverifiable. In his thorough book, Yallop includes anything even remotely suspicious about the Vatican, but doesn't mention our Mr.Champneys. Nor does anyone else it seems.

Regrettably, I think this strange book has to be given a thumbs-down (and it wasn't long before I put it down.)
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book certainly worth reading, 6 Jun. 2014
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G. Young - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Murder in the Vatican: The CIA and the Bolshevik Pontiff (Paperback)
While the subject matter is serious, it is delivered in a light and funny way. It is one of the books I have kept to read again.
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4 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Pack of errors and lies, 28 Aug. 2013
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This review is from: Murder in the Vatican: The CIA and the Bolshevik Pontiff (Paperback)
I am very disappointed with this book. There are many errors and blatant lies bound together and written by someone who is obviously of red heart and mind. I should have known better and do some search about the author before spending over £8 for rubbish like this. Great mistake, certainly not recommended.
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2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars No Way Out, 18 Oct. 2013
One of the first e-books I bought on Amazon before I learnt to do some research, and one of the worst.

There are simply better books on the subject, mainly "A Thief in the Night" by John Cornwell and "In God's Name" by David Yallop. The first one claims that JPI wasn't murdered, while the second one (written first) does.

One possibility all three writers overlook is that JPI may have simply committed suicide! He clearly didn't want to be pope - what other options did he have? Until Joey Ratzinger decided to abdicate, pope's stayed in office until they died (like JPII). Popes are human; there is no reason to think he may not have killed himself. And if this were the case, it would explain why the Vatican tried to cover it up.

And while there are some interesting points in the book about CIA's operations in Europe, books like Gladio: NATO's Dagger at the Heart of Europe: The Pentagon-Nazi-Mafia Terror Axis cover these aspects much better.

Further, the auhtor is simply too keen to make spurious theological points on the back of his narrative.
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Murder in the Vatican: The CIA and the Bolshevik Pontiff
Murder in the Vatican: The CIA and the Bolshevik Pontiff by Lucien Gregoire (Paperback - 12 Oct. 2010)
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