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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a holistically funny book!
Dirk Gently owns a 'holistic detective agency', believing that as all things are connected, seemingly random coincidences can solve a mystery. The mystery needing to be solved now involves a coke machine, disappearing- and re-appearing- norse gods, an american woman in england, a strange eagle that may have more to it than meets the eye, a private hospital for 'strange'...
Published on 19 May 2005 by Ms. Caitlin B. Blanchard

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3.0 out of 5 stars My Intro to Adams..it's ok!
OK, heckle me now..This was my first Adams, mid-way through my twenties. For that, I have no excuse whatsoever.

To be honest though, I wasn't massively impressed. I liked some of his characters (well, Dirk Gently anyway), and I liked the general theme of the book (the difficult position of ye olde Gods in the 20th century). But to be honest, once our intrepid...
Published on 6 Nov. 2009 by R. Davies


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars a holistically funny book!, 19 May 2005
Dirk Gently owns a 'holistic detective agency', believing that as all things are connected, seemingly random coincidences can solve a mystery. The mystery needing to be solved now involves a coke machine, disappearing- and re-appearing- norse gods, an american woman in england, a strange eagle that may have more to it than meets the eye, a private hospital for 'strange' cases, a demon with a contract, and, god forbid, LAWYERS.
The same, random, bizarre and genuinely funny humour from the writer of 'The HitchHikers Guide To the Galaxy' and while not as hysterical, incisive or purely brilliant as that series, is still a fantastic, and not wholly light-hearted piece of fiction.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A 3-in-1 book - murder, mystery, and just plain bizarre, 8 Sept. 2000
By A Customer
If you've read any Douglas Adams books, e.g. any of the Hitch-Hikers Guide books then you'll know not to expect a run-of-the-mill story.
The book follows Dirk Gently who runs his very own holistic detective agency. Without wanting to spoil any of the surprises and twists that await you I'll just mention that the book really begins when a check-in desk at Heathrow Airport is engulfed in a ball of flames. This, remember, is where it begins - if you tried to guess where it ends I can assure you that you'd be wrong. Throughout the book Adams writes in very readable style, managing to sew the plot together well.
It occurs to me that if you're a Monty Python fan then you'll love this book. Alas, I only wish we'd studied books like this in school.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars John Cleese + Isaac Asimov = Douglas Adams, 30 Jan. 1997
By A Customer
A reader of this book could easily get lost in Douglas Adams' unrelenting British dry humor and overlook the touching tragedy in his brilliant tale about immortal gods who have been cast aside, ignored and all but forgotten by their vapid subjects. His characters spend their time stumbling down a bouncing high-wire, teetering between silliness and profundity. Just when they seem in danger of plummeting off one side or the other, the author pulls them back and sends them down another plot twist that at first seems absurd and then seems absurd that it's all beginning to make sense. Adams has an ability to at once convey both the complexity and the insanity of the post-quantum physics world. This is a book which will help us understand why Einstein always had that bizarre, far-away look in his eyes. Einstein had caught a glimpse of the true nature of the universe -- and so will the reader of this extraordinary story.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wacky and Fun But Missing Something at the End, 20 Feb. 2004
By 
Mark Baker (Santa Clarita, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Kate Schechter should have taken the signs the universe was trying to give her. That's what she tells herself as she shows up at the airport for a trip to Norway in spite of all the warnings. Still, she is unprepared for the check in desk to be blown through the roof just after she misses her flight.
Meanwhile, Dirk Gently has hit a low. He has almost no money and no clients. Except the one he's forgotten about who promptly gets himself killed. Now Dirk feels responsible for not taking this guy's claims serious and wants to track down the green eyed monster. As if that weren't enough, he and his cleaning lady are having a war over who will open his fridge first, an out of order soda machine keeps appearing and disappearing, and he's being stalked by an eagle. What these seemingly unrelated events have to do with each other provides plenty of wacky entertainment.
I am still only mildly familiar with the books of Douglas Adams, and I simply must correct that. This fantasy novel was wonderfully strange and entertaining. The opening bits about the airport and Kate's trip had me laughing out loud. The laughs slowed down over the course of the book, but they were still plentiful. Maybe it's my normal reading of mysteries, but my only real complaint was an ending that was really more confusing then enlightening of what had gone on before.
This is a wonderful title sure to entertain. I must move more of his books higher up my to be read pile.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Some people just don't get it!, 27 May 1999
By A Customer
I see so many reviews here about how this can't compare to HHGTTG or how the DGHDA books are just too confusing. They just don't seem to understand the sublime humor, complexity, and beauty wrought in these books. Its not the anything-for-laughs absurdity of the HHGTTG series; It tries to acheive a higher plane in humor. This book, spared the somewhat sluggish intro of its previous, works so well. The journey will bewilder you, but hang in and it'll start making sense. A masterpiece! Please, DNA, don't listen to all the whiners wishing for another quick-and-easy book in the HHGTTG series; That horse is long dead, so quit beating it. Continue on producing better books; Don't be dissuaded by the naysayers who can't let go of the past...
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yes and Yes!, 8 Dec. 1997
By A Customer
Actually an improvement over the first Dirk Gently, the stakes not being so high improves the telling of the tale. Whereas the Hitchhiker ultimately disappointed in the last book, Dirk seems to improve and increase. Why Douglas has neglected him since then I wish I knew! There is an odd disjointed beauty in the overall structure, details such as the mental ward Dirk visits, the mystery of Harold Bell, the truck driver followed by a lovesick rain cloud stick in the mind. I found the tape version cleared up some of the more British details (the eagle with RAF marks on its wings, for example) without distracting from the whole. The only writer who seems to whet my appetite for more Adams isthe Japanese Haruki Murakami, who may have drunk from the same spring as Adams. But its not the same! Will Dirk ever solve the mystery of what happened to Fenchurch, from Hitchhikers? Mrsmishima
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Death of the Immortals, 30 Jan. 2006
By 
Jane Aland (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
'The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul' is Douglas Adams 2nd Dirk Gently novel, following on from 'Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency', and this time sees Dirk investigating the explosive disappearance of his ex-secretary and the decapitation of his latest client. In many ways 'The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul' is a more straightforward novel than it's predecessor, with the main storyline concerning the immortal remnants of the Asgardian gods always being to the fore, though it's still fun watching Adams tie-up the disparate plot-threads using Dirk's holistic detective approach. Sadly one thing common it has with the first Dirk Gently novel is that after a hugely enjoyable build-up the novel ends with a disappointing 'blink and you'll miss it' climax, but the crucial fact that this appears to be an original novel rather than a conglomeration of Adams old Doctor Who scripts makes this ultimately the more enjoyable of the two novels.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A word or two concerning The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul, 7 Oct. 1996
By A Customer
Much can be said of The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul, most of it rather meaningless. After all, how many detective stories have a very dirty refrigerator as the key to the mystery and a detective with an 8th sense? The world of the gods has been drastically altered, and the realm of humanity has been adversely affected. Only one man can save both. Dirk Gently, super-sleuth. As is typical of Douglas Adams's genius, a series of seemingly meaningless and unrelated events turn out to be tremendously important...to the story anyway. Dirk has to relate all of these events to find out what is wrong, and an eagle following him down a street has a goodly amount of anger towards him, causing even more problems. Other...interesting (for lack of a better word) situations confront Dirk while on his quest, including car accidents, a man who had his head cut off and placed on a record player, and navigating a massive party thrown by the gods themselves. The situations, and the dialogue, keep the reader interested, as you end up asking yourself, "What the hell is going on?" Of course, they are also extremely funny. A rather interesting example, when Dirk is talking to Kate, a person nearly killed when the check-in desk at Heathrow Airport explodes, follows. Kate: "Well, this name here is Dennis Hutch, isn't it? See?" Dirk: "Oh, yes. Yes I do. Er, should I know that name?" Kate: "Well, it depends if you're alive or not, I suppose. He's the head of the Aries Rising Record Group. Less famous than the Pope, I grant you, but--you know of the Pope, I take it?" Dirk: "Yes, yes. White haired chap." Kate: "That's him. He seems to be the only person of note this envelope hasn't been addressed to at some time. Here's Stan Dubcek, the head of Dubcek, Danton, Heidegger, Draycott. I know they handle the ARRGH! account." Dirk: "The--?" Kate: "ARRGH! Aries Rising Record Group Holdings. Getting that account made the agency's fortunes." The entire book is full of these crazy, yet meaningful conversations. Put together, they make for a very good mystery, and a humorous one at that (yes, the conversation about the dirty refrigerator does have meaning, the first one with his secretary). Perhaps the greatest achievement of this book is the skill at which Douglas Adams creates situations that show how stupid humans can be, and how callous we are. Although there is not nearly as much of this as in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy (also very funny) series, the ideas make you think, the universal trademark of a great book. They can be hard to identify, but they are there, if one looks hard enough. The above is why I like this book. It has real meaning, and it is very entertaining to read, something that can not be said of many books. I can honestly say that there is nothing that I dont like about this book. I would recommend it to anyone, especially to those who have a sense of humor that has been dulled by the daily routine of life. They will benefit most.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ode to the Master, 24 May 2001
By A Customer
What will the world be like without the inimatable, English electricity board-hating countenance of Douglas Adams? Will life (the universe, and everything) be the same again? I have to say farewell to this enigmatic genius who passed away on the 11th of May, 2001: So long, and thanks for all the fish. I hope he has as much success in afterlife as he had in reality...because, well, he's an unuterable mastermind. "The Long Dark Tea-time of the Soul" is the second Dirk Gently novel by the Originator of the Comic Science Fiction genre. Adams inaugurally came into prominence with the 1979 radio script of "The Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy". He rewrote this into novel format in 1980, following this with a sporadic series of delightful novels including "The Restaurant At The End of the Universe", "Life, the Universe, and Everything", "So Long, And Thanks for All the Fish" and most recently, "Mostly Harmless" (the entire, unabridged description of Earth!). In between the HGTTG novels, he gave us the pair of nonsensical dictionaries coauthored with John Lloyd "The Meaning of Liff" and the rehashed "The Deeper Meaning of Liff", as well as coauthoring the humorous, insightful gem of a wildlife travelogue "Last Chance To See..." with the zoologist Mark Cawardine. Douglas Adams is also known for co-editing and contributing to "The Utterly Utterly Merry Comic Relief Christmas Books", "Monty Python's Flying Circus" and was re-editing the first Hitch-Hikers Guide to the Galaxy screenplay. He penned the original concept and the prologue for the "Starship Titanic", gave us the short-story "Young Zaphod Plays It Safe", transferred the HGTTG magic into an Illustrated Guide and several omnibuses, and then began to write about the irrepressibly brilliant protagonist, Dirk Gently... Adams first introduced Dirk in "Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency", gave us the sequel of "The Long Dark Tea-time of the Soul" and had written half of the trilogy-filler, "The Salmon of Doubt" when he sorrowfully left us. "The Long Dark Tea-time of the Soul" juxtaposes the amiable private investigator (who relies on interconnectedness as a method) into a mystery involving a lurking refrigerator; a murdered client; a goblin-like minion; a Coca-Cola machine; a large, brawny, husky giant and his hammer; and a psychotic eagle to entertain us. Dirk Gently is one of the funniest epitomes of the anti-hero in comic fantasy, and to lose him before the end is tragic. That is why I recently went back to re-read this latest Dirk Gently escapade. Watch out for the "Zen" Navigation method and the Great Zaganza's horoscope column: they'll have you rolling in the aisles! Adams has certainly left his mark on fiction forever, and will go down in the tomes of Man as being the most anarchic, original and hilarious author to come out of England in the 20th century, and die a much too soon death. His first novel, however, will always be a classic, and is one of those enduring pieces which makes you feel warm on a cold night. Mr Adams, you will be enormously missed.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply stunning, 8 May 2012
It's not often that a standalone novel spawns a sequel that is actually better than the first, but that is what Adams achieved with this second Dirk Gently novel.

'Teatime' is, to me, an improvement on the first book in two particular ways:

1. The character interaction is stepped up to the point where every encounter and conversation makes me belly laugh until I hurt.

2. The plot is tighter and less rambling than the first. While that was a strength of Dirk Gently 1, it would have been too much to do it again. This plot is a good, solid, fantasy/sci-fi/mystery one that builds beautifully.

Certain passages stand out. I will always remember and love the opening scene with the airport, Dirk's navigation and the car accident, and Dirk with the eagle.

Dirk becomes even funnier and more complex in this second outing and, given the wonderful addition of characters like Kate Schechter and Thor, it just couldn't be better.

A brilliant novel and unsurpassed in the field of comedy literature for me.
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The Long Dark Tea Time of the Soul (Dirk Gently 2)
The Long Dark Tea Time of the Soul (Dirk Gently 2) by Douglas Adams (Paperback - 6 Dec. 2012)
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