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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars CfD Counselling.
Working as a CfD counsellor in an IAPT service within the NHS I can highly recommend this book as the main introduction to this new modality of therapy. This book demystify's the modality and explains the essention foundations and theoretical framework in a clear concise manner. The creation of this modality offers the best of Person Centred theory coupled with Emotion...
Published 11 months ago by Nathaniel J Black

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I support where the authors are coming from
I work as a trainee counsellor in an IAPT setting, working humanistically. This book acknowledges the nuances of an IAPT setting with feedback info gathering and working in a time limited way. I did skip most of the chapters on research but I appreciate what the authors are trying to do for person centred therapy. There was general background on person centred theory...
Published 6 months ago by Amy


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars CfD Counselling., 16 May 2014
By 
Nathaniel J Black (North Tyneside, Tyne & Wear United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Counselling for Depression (Paperback)
Working as a CfD counsellor in an IAPT service within the NHS I can highly recommend this book as the main introduction to this new modality of therapy. This book demystify's the modality and explains the essention foundations and theoretical framework in a clear concise manner. The creation of this modality offers the best of Person Centred theory coupled with Emotion Focused Therapy to be able to work with highly distressed individuals. As ever Pete Sanders approach is to demedicalise theory and offer clarity within a counselling process and I believe he has managed to perform this successfully.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I support where the authors are coming from, 6 Oct. 2014
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This review is from: Counselling for Depression (Paperback)
I work as a trainee counsellor in an IAPT setting, working humanistically. This book acknowledges the nuances of an IAPT setting with feedback info gathering and working in a time limited way. I did skip most of the chapters on research but I appreciate what the authors are trying to do for person centred therapy. There was general background on person centred theory which can be found in any book on person centred theory. The most useful to me were the depression chapters and case study examples at the end. An interesting read but not as useful to my practice as I had hoped (but I am not a Counselling for Depression CfD practitioner).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Counselling for Depression: A Person-centred and Experiential Approach, 11 May 2014
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This review is from: Counselling for Depression (Paperback)
This book gives a good theoretical background for readers who should gain some insight into the subject of depression. Would recommend it to anyone interested in the subject.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Brave attempt at the impossible, 4 Aug. 2014
By 
John Rowan (London England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Counselling for Depression (Paperback)
This is a curious book, coming out of a concern that anything other than CBT would not be supported by the National Health Service under the heading of IAPT (the Government scheme for Improving Access to Psychological Therapies). “We present CfD as a new integrative model, limited to a maximum of 20 sessions, for people suffering from depression.” (p.4)
As the authors themselves admit, “Many readers will know that ideas such as competence, manualisation, protocols, outcome and adherence measures are troublesome if not anathema for humanistic theory and practice.” (p.4) Nevertheless, that is what we have here. The authors say that they are motivated by two aims: “First, to see person-centred and experiential counselling available free to patients in the National Health Service via IAPT, and, second, for jobs to be available for the thousands of already well-qualified person-centred and experiential practitioners working in primary care.” (p.4) Chapter 2 is all about research – what it is and how it works in therapy. It can be skipped by everyone except the unfortunate student who has to write an essay on it. Chapter 3 introduces the Competence Framework, which again is all about objective evidence. There is a lot of talk about competence in counselling these days, and it is always extremely boring to read.
Chapter 4 is all about depression. The attempt to define depression is virtually always a wild-goose chase, and this chapter is no exception. “It is important to remind ourselves that practically every aspect of depression is continuously changing – our understanding and definitions of what it is, the methods of diagnosis, the way we collect data, the rates of occurrence and so on.” (p.40) There is quite a long but ultimately not very helpful discussion of antidepressive medication. I found this chapter rather depressing.
Chapter 5 is about person-centred and experiential therapies, not a very inspiring account. Chapter 6 is “Conceptualising depression from a person-centred and experiential therapies perspective.” This mentions the concept of ‘configurations of self’, but not the more recent work on the dialogical self, which would have been relevant.
In Chapter 7 we encounter the idea of working briefly – a brave attempt to make sense of the real economic restraints under which the NHS is working. Again the result is rather depressing. Chapter 8 is quite a technical discussion of the techniques which can be used. It does include a discussion of Gendlin’s Focussing, which is quite a bonus.
There are some good case examples and other bits and pieces, which do not quite add up to a convincing conclusion. Personally I found this a brave attempt at the impossible, but ultimately unsatisfying and unconvincing. It was a bit like reading a book called ‘How to make a cuddly toy using only cardboard’.
John Rowan
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 1 Mar. 2015
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This review is from: Counselling for Depression (Paperback)
excellent
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not Dave Mearns usual style, 19 Jan. 2015
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This review is from: Counselling for Depression (Paperback)
Very technical which took me by surprise .
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Course book, 5 Oct. 2014
This review is from: Counselling for Depression (Paperback)
Good books for course - worth buying
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Counselling for Depression
Counselling for Depression by Andy Hill (Paperback - 1 Mar. 2014)
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