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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars How the Saint Makes His Debut
I read a Pocket Book Edition, and it contains three stories; "The Man Who Was Clever", "The Policeman With Wings", "The Lawless Lady".
This book is written after "The Last Hero", but it describes the Saint's adventures before "The Last Hero", how he makes his debut as a "Modern Robin Hood". In the foreword, Charteris states that this is the answer to the many...
Published on 31 July 2002

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Simon Templar Mk1
These early Saint stories illustrate just how much the character developed over the years. The youthful Simon Templar shows fighting skills which are worthy of a super hero. Indeed, if you took away the dressing-up aspect and tragic back-story from Batman (1939) what remained would essentially be The Saint. A charming, handsome, larger than life, wealthy young man who...
Published 20 months ago by Foden Wheatley


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars How the Saint Makes His Debut, 31 July 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Enter the Saint (Paperback)
I read a Pocket Book Edition, and it contains three stories; "The Man Who Was Clever", "The Policeman With Wings", "The Lawless Lady".
This book is written after "The Last Hero", but it describes the Saint's adventures before "The Last Hero", how he makes his debut as a "Modern Robin Hood". In the foreword, Charteris states that this is the answer to the many people's question how the Saint gains the reputation that he already has in "The Last Hero".
The stories are rather simple and not so unique as later stories such as "The Saint and Mr. Teal". But I like them. Few dull parts and highly enjoyable. I particularly love the Saint of this era; youthful, gay and lively. And I also like his amiable and capable sidekick Roger Conway. It's a pity that he doesn't appear on later stories.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Saint Saga Nº 02, 5 Feb. 2006
By 
Paul Magnussen (Campbell, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Meet the Tiger (later retitled "The Saint meets the Tiger") published in 1928, was Leslie Charteris's first book in the Saint Saga (even though Hodder & Stoughton later pretended that "Enter the Saint" was, presumably because they weren't the publishers of the former).

Nevertheless, "Enter the Saint" is the book that introduces Simon Templar as he is in most of the books that follow, and as neither the cinema nor television has yet had the nerve to portray him: he beats people up, robs them, blackmails them, even murders them, and gets away with it. And the fact that his victims are particularly vicious thugs (Snake Ganning), dope dealers (Edgar Hayn), white slavers, war profiteers and so forth — and that he gives a large chunk of his profits to charity — would not excuse him to a strict moralist. The success of the Saint books for seventy years must mean that strict moralists are perhaps not as common as one ought to hope.

There are three longish stories; a reference that may be presumed to be to Sir John Bittle (from "Meet The Tiger") dates the first at nine months after the end of that opus.

To enumerate plot details would probably be superfluous. Suffice it to say that Charteris was just starting to hit his stride, and that "Enter" introduces two of his best characters: the Saint's friend Roger Conway, and his perpetual adversary, Inspector Claud Eustace Teal. Patricia Holm now lives with the Saint although (daringly for 1930) they aren't married, and Orace is still the stalwart retainer.

A fine warm up to its sequel, what is possibly the best of all the Saint stories: The Last Hero (aka "The Saint Closes the Case").

P.S. For a list of all Charteris's Saint books (in two sections, because of length limitations) see my Listmanias.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars First quality Saint, 12 Feb. 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Enter the Saint (Paperback)
(The second of the Saint books, where Simon Templar really began to hit his stride. Charteris in later years didn't care for the first book, Meet the Tiger! very much.)
Consists of 2 novellas, "The Man Who Was Clever" and "The Lawless Lady". If you have The Saint: Five Complete Novels, then you already have this book as part of that one.
In "The Man Who Was Clever", the Saint takes on Edgar Hayn, a drug dealer who runs some undercover gambling operations in London. "The Lawless Lady" is more the story of Dicky Tremayne, one of the Saint's friends and another wearer of the halo, and his pursuit of Audrey Perowne.
Covers the first appearance of Inspector Teal, and the poor man's initial encounters with the Saint, when the Saint was first beginning to make his signature stick-figure drawings the terror of evildoers. In those days, the Saint operated with a team of four other Saints, and made a point of donating 10% of the take from every operation to charity (which helped rub the salt into Teal's wounds by underlining that the Saint had got away with it yet again...)
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb writing characteristic of Leslie Charteris, 25 Sept. 2013
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This review is from: Enter the Saint (Saint 03) (Paperback)
As a kid, I've heard so much about The Saint by Leslie Charteris but never got to read any of the books. I have viewed many of The Saint series on television though. But, alas, nothing beats the book because Leslie Charteris is able to describe each scene, each mood, each situation so vividly realistic you feel as though you were part of what is written.
This is the second book I am reading now having read The Saint Closes The Case and I am certainly not disappointed.
Will definitely recommend to anyone who expects and demands a good book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Saint Saga Nº 02, 13 Jun. 2013
By 
Paul Magnussen (Campbell, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Enter the Saint (Saint 03) (Paperback)
Meet the Tiger (later retitled "The Saint meets the Tiger"), published in 1928, was Leslie Charteris's first book in the Saint Saga (even though Hodder & Stoughton later pretended that "Enter the Saint" was, presumably because they weren't the publishers of the former).

Nevertheless, "Enter the Saint" is the book that introduces Simon Templar as he is in most of the books that follow, and as neither the cinema nor television has yet had the nerve to portray him: he beats people up, robs them, blackmails them, even murders them, and gets away with it. And the fact that his victims are particularly vicious thugs (Snake Ganning), dope dealers (Edgar Hayn), white slavers, war profiteers and so forth — and that he gives a large chunk of his profits to charity — would not excuse him to a strict moralist. The success of the Saint books for seventy years must mean that strict moralists are perhaps not as common as one ought to hope.

There are three longish stories; a reference that may be presumed to be to Sir John Bittle (from "Meet The Tiger") dates the first at nine months after the end of that opus.

To enumerate plot details would probably be superfluous. Suffice it to say that Charteris was just starting to hit his stride, and that "Enter" introduces two of his best characters: the Saint's friend Roger Conway, and his perpetual adversary, Inspector Claud Eustace Teal. Patricia Holm now lives with the Saint although (daringly for 1930) they aren't married, and Orace is still the stalwart retainer.

A fine warm up to its sequel, what is possibly the best of all the Saint stories: The Last Hero (aka The Saint Closes the Case).

N.B. Contrary to the assertion on this page, this is 2nd Saint book, not the 3rd.

P.S. For a list of all Charteris's Saint books (in two sections, because of length limitations) see my Listmanias.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Heaven's Above, 22 Aug. 2013
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This review is from: Enter the Saint (Kindle Edition)
I'm a 'Saint' addict, and although I may well have read most of the Saint series of novella's I can re-read them again and again. Excellent novels and well written. It's like reading an updated Robin Hood story! Keep 'em coming!
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Saint lays into the Ungodly in fine style, 7 Dec. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Enter the Saint (Paperback)
Rip roaring Boys Own stuff as Simon Templar sorts out Snake Ganning and various other members of London's late twenties Underworld, mixing wit, intelligence and good old fashioned rough housing to good effect.
Patricia Holm and Roger Conway are here too, with poor old Claud Eustace bringing up the rear.
Perhaps not Charteris' most polished piece of penmanship, in this early instalment of the Saint Saga, but don't let that put you off. All three short stories contained herein are entertaining - and what more can you ask for in a book?
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5.0 out of 5 stars Saint Saga Nº 02, 25 Sept. 2008
By 
Paul Magnussen (Campbell, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Meet the Tiger (later retitled "The Saint meets the Tiger") published in 1928, was Leslie Charteris's first book in the Saint Saga (even though Hodder & Stoughton later pretended that "Enter the Saint" was, presumably because they weren't the publishers of the former).

Nevertheless, "Enter the Saint" is the book that introduces Simon Templar as he is in most of the books that follow, and as neither the cinema nor television has yet had the nerve to portray him: he beats people up, robs them, blackmails them, even murders them, and gets away with it. And the fact that his victims are particularly vicious thugs (Snake Ganning), dope dealers (Edgar Hayn), white slavers, war profiteers and so forth -- and that he gives a large chunk of his profits to charity -- would not excuse him to a strict moralist. The success of the Saint books for seventy years must mean that strict moralists are perhaps not as common as one ought to hope.

There are three longish stories; a reference that may be presumed to be to Sir John Bittle (from "Meet The Tiger") dates the first at nine months after the end of that opus.

To enumerate plot details would probably be superfluous. Suffice it to say that Charteris was just starting to hit his stride, and that "Enter" introduces two of his best characters: the Saint's friend Roger Conway, and his perpetual adversary, Inspector Claude Eustace Teal. Patricia Holm now lives with the Saint although (daringly for 1930) they aren't married, and Orace is still the stalwart retainer.

A fine warm up to its sequel, what is possibly the best of all the Saint stories: The Last Hero (aka "The Saint Closes the Case").
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3.0 out of 5 stars Simon Templar Mk1, 6 Aug. 2013
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This review is from: Enter the Saint (Saint 03) (Paperback)
These early Saint stories illustrate just how much the character developed over the years. The youthful Simon Templar shows fighting skills which are worthy of a super hero. Indeed, if you took away the dressing-up aspect and tragic back-story from Batman (1939) what remained would essentially be The Saint. A charming, handsome, larger than life, wealthy young man who uses his wits and physical prowess to defeat criminals and other enemies of society, whether the law approves of his methods or not.

As The Saint's character evolves through the books, Leslie Charteris must have realised that for Templar to resort to violence so swiftly and predictably would have become tiresome for the reader. Therefore his solutions to defeating the baddies become more ingenious and only involve physical violence when The Saint is cornered or has no other means of escape.

This story includes some impenetrable 1920's hipspeak, as incongruous to us now as present day gangster rap will no doubt seem a hundred year from now. The Saint has just duffed up five London hoodlums at a club and as he leaves he bumps into one of the accomplices to whom he says, "Hullo sweetness, pass right down the car and hear the new joke the Boys of the Burg downstairs are laughing at."
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Saint Goes On !, 5 Jun. 2014
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This review is from: Enter the Saint (Saint 03) (Paperback)
I just want to make a general appreciation of the fact that these wonderful books are back in print - with excellent introductions by crime writers and other enthusiasts. These books which are not sufficiently well known these days are up there with P G Wodehouse, better than James Bond and much better than almost anything else in their genre.

I know of many people who will tell you that their lives, attitudes and resilience have benefitted from an early acquaintance with Simon Templar. Well, now he's back for a new generation. The Saint Goes On !
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Enter the Saint (Saint 03)
Enter the Saint (Saint 03) by Leslie Charteris (Paperback - 28 Feb. 2013)
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