Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Up to 70% off Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

89
4.0 out of 5 stars
The King's Deception
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:£6.99+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on 30 September 2013
I very rarely abandon a book that I've paid for, but I'm afraid I did with this one. Eventually I got so frustrated with reading about supposedly English characters in places I know well, who sounded like American tourists on a 10 city coach trip, with minimal knowledge of England, the British language or culture. It felt like it had been written by someone who had only very superficial knowledge of where he was writing about. I don't mind at all reading about an American character in England calling pavements sidewalks, or even if the background description, written by an American author calls it a sidewalk, but when an English character does it sets my teeth on edge. I am using this as an example, and the specific may not have actually happened in this book, but it was a general feeling I got. I apologise to the author for writing a bad review, a thing I have only ever done once before, as I know how much work goes into writing a book. Usually I will just not write a review at all if I don't like it, but in this case I felt I had to.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 22 February 2014
I've read all the Cotton Malone series and enjoyed them as "not to be taken too seriously" edge of the seat capers. Normally his sense of place and atmosphere is very well crafted. This book, however falls into a sub Dan Brown style of literally quoting verbatim visitor guides of famous places. I really thought Dan Brown had taken this appalling technique to the limit with "Inferno", but I think Steve Berry may well have outdone him here.
Maybe it was because this was set in London, and Steve was in awe of actually standing in the place of history that is so relevant to Americans, but huge tracts read like a gushing tour guide, and were often repetitive.
Then we have the "London" language used. I do not know who Steve spoke to when doing his research into how a teenage London street kid would speak, but honestly this character's language was hilarious. When was the last time a teenager brought up on the Streets would say "come a cropper" or refer to bad men as "B*ggers". I was waiting for someone to say "Cor luva Duck, Guvnor, it's a fair cop!" Perhaps Dick van Dyke could play the part if this was ever filmed.
The other characters were so excessive as to be utterly unbelievable, especially the head of MI6 and the CIA agent. As I said at the beginning I like Steve Berry's work and I understand that there is a requirement to read this genre with a willing suspension of disbelief, but this pushed credibility too far. Peoples actions and motivations were just too far fetched.
Finally how many times did we retrace the tired old ground of Malone's ex wife. I know it had relevance to the plot, but this particular plot device was about as subtle as a sledgehammer.
All in all very disappointing, and if not improved upon dramatically in the next novel, Steve Berry will have lost a loyal reader and advocate.
(You will have noticed that I have not even discussed the main subject of the plot. That is simply because Steve Berry writing this and expecting any readers (and his characters) to have not been aware of this historical nonsense beggars belief. Perhaps after returning to The U.S.A. he was telling everyone about this amazing Monster that lives in a Scottish loch and assuming it was news!)
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 14 February 2014
I chose this book on holiday because I saw a lot of people reading it (in US). It was an ok read and an entertaining plot but not especially well written and irritatingly American in language considering it's based in the UK. Even the english characters talked about sidewalks and having biscuits and cream for tea!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 29 January 2014
Cotton Malone entertains yet again with another blast through the made up world of Steve Berry's making. A good read. Lots of requests and turns that leave as many questions un answered as solved. A good addition to the cotton collection
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 1 August 2015
The Plot
Ex- Justice Department agent Cotton Malone thinks he is performing a relatively simple favour for a friend when he gets caught up in a secret that has been kept hidden for 500 years and could have disastrous effects should the truth ever come to light. To complicate matters, Malone's son is at the heart of another secret that could blow Malone's relationship with his son apart.

My Opinion
This was my first Cotton Malone novel and although it is the 8th book in the series I enjoyed it without having to read the previous 7. The usual problems ensue from an American author attempting to recreate the English style of speech, but no more than in countless other novels and although I am familiar with a number of the locations described I didn't constantly feel the need to correct descriptions which is sometimes the case.

The plot was well woven and kept me interested all the way through. However, with so many initial facets to the storyline it took a while for me to really get into the story. I appreciated the well researched historical background as well as the fact the novel wasn't littered with historical references that were unnecessarily long, convoluted or just plain unnecessary. The characters had depth and believable motivations and i was never left thinking 'what just happened??'

If you like Dan Brown, Iain Pears or similar authors then you are onto a winner with this one. I will certainly be looking out for other Steve Berry books in the future.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Book 8, in the Cotton Malone series

This is another suspense thriller that weaves his tale around documented facts, events and known figures of history. Being a fan of conspiracy and the Tudor period I much enjoyed Mr. Berry's spin on time.

Right from the start I was engaged by the secrets societies the political intrigue and the Tudor secrets although at the heart of the story is the all too real drama of Abdelbaset al-Megrahi, a former intelligence officer, convicted of 270 counts of murder for the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland. After tweaking some facts and adjusting them to fit his creation, the author has filled the pages with the right formula and provided us with a panoramic view of the past while slowly introducing the present day setting. I will skip the intricacies not to spoil the enjoyment of this action-filled and well-written mix of history with the spy action. Yes there is plenty of action and the Tudor secret that is behind the operation has a great romp of intrigue. We have three strands in this story that are interwoven in cinematic scenes, very visual as they move from one plot to another. If you can keep track of all the characters you are in for a treat. There are no loose ends everything is wrapped up nicely. As always we find at the end of the book a writer's note separating fact and fiction.

Most part is quite entertaining however on the down side I did find the central mystery to be rather flimsy and the machinations which involved the CIA lacked logical consistency. But again this is a thriller and it wouldn't be fun if our imagination wasn't stretched to its limits..
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on 12 November 2013
I bought this book on a whim, never having read one by Steve Berry before.

Well, if this is an example of his work, I won't be reading any more.

Leaving aside the ridiculous story (a shadowy group protecting a long lost Royal secret, you know the routine) and the constant history lectures ("X went on the explain that King Henry had...."), what most irritated me was the writing style.

Very grating.
Because every few pages there were paragraphs just like this.
Short.
Just a few words.
Trying to be punchy.
Failing.

Then we have the historical and geographical errors. Passing through Oxford and Cirencester to get to Bisley in Surrey, oh and Bisley being located in the Cotswolds - sorry, the "Cotswold Hills"? James II being listed as Charles II's son (he was his brother)? Come on, if you are writing a story with a historical background, set in another country, at least try to get your facts straight!

I gave up on this book half way through. I really didn't care what the "secret" was and couldn't be bothered to read on to find out. I would not recommend this book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 16 February 2015
I am a fan of Steve Berry and his books and this was an enjoyable read. I would say it was a 'middle-of-the-road' effort. Berry has written worse and better books. On the plus side there is plenty of action, intrigue and bodies galore. The book's main plot, involving a dark secret about Elizabeth I and Henry VIII, was right up my street, even if the actual 'secret' was preposterous, even for the genre. Berry does weave multiple plots well and the coming together of all the strands at the book's climactic end is well-crafted. There is the secret of Elizabeth I, the plot to prevent the British from releasing a Libyan terrorist, Cotton Malone's personal struggle to protect his son (mainly from the boy's biological father), the redemption of a teenage trouble-maker and the intelligence agencies fight to protect UK interests against a rougue US agent.
There were one or two typos, historical inaccuracies (James II was Charles II's brother, not son, and I believe one or two death dates were wrong, aswell as the dates for the Cecils' rise to power under Elizabeth I). However, what does tend to annoy me is Berry's mixing of multiple scenes in one chapter, which leads to confusion as to what is going on and having to re-read a passage, interrupting the book's flow. Cautiously recommended.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on 15 July 2013
I've read most of the Cotton Malone series and really enjoyed them. And to be fair, this one isn't bad either. Unfortunately, the other ones have been set all over the world, but this one's in London (where I grew up) and Steve Berry just gets too much wrong. He gets English speech patterns wrong, he has English people using phrases that I've only ever heard Americans use when talking about the British, and he gets basic London facts wrong. I don't have a problem with the fact it's an American book (no issues with pavements being sidewalks, American spellings of words like colour, etc.), I have a problem with silly mistakes distracting me from the plot. Yes, I know it's pedantic, but when someone walks through the glass doors of a tube station that I know doesn't have glass doors (or at least didn't last week!) it spoils my enjoyment of what is meant to be escapism.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 17 March 2015
The pace is as slow as a snail and fails to provide any excitement at all. The ending is so obvious. The plot is unbelievable. It's not often I throw a book away but this is going down to the tip (recyclable of course).
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
The Lincoln Myth (Cotton Malone)
The Lincoln Myth (Cotton Malone) by Steve Berry (Paperback - 25 Nov. 2014)
£6.78

The Martyr's Curse (Ben Hope, Book 11)
The Martyr's Curse (Ben Hope, Book 11) by Scott Mariani (Paperback - 4 Jun. 2015)
£3.85

The Templar Legacy: Cotton Malone 1
The Templar Legacy: Cotton Malone 1 by Steve Berry (Paperback - 30 Nov. 2006)
£7.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.