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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A tour de force
This is Elizabeth's George's best book so far and I have read them all. The characterisation of Barbara Havers, and the inspector she works with is excellent. The growing relationship between Barabara and Azhar is touching, and there is a valuable and instructive exploration of the racism that exists in our society. The book is also gripping - a very good read, more...
Published on 13 Jan 2001 by A. K. Wright

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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Painfully anachronistic
I think Elizabeth George is one of the better writers in the genre, despite not being native to the culture she writes about. I overlooked some of the mistakes in slang and customs in the earlier books, but by this stage in the series one expects better. Who in God's name describes Pakistanis as "coloureds" in the 1990s? It's like an Alf Garnett programme, only the makers...
Published on 28 Dec 2007 by Bupster


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A tour de force, 13 Jan 2001
By 
A. K. Wright (Woking in Surrey, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is Elizabeth's George's best book so far and I have read them all. The characterisation of Barbara Havers, and the inspector she works with is excellent. The growing relationship between Barabara and Azhar is touching, and there is a valuable and instructive exploration of the racism that exists in our society. The book is also gripping - a very good read, more powerful if you've read some of the others first, as George is good at developing her characters a bit at a time. I hope the sequel to her most recent In pursuit of the Proper Sinner, doesn't take too long.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good mystery, pity about Asian stereotypes, 23 Sep 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Deception on His Mind (Hardcover)
This is a very good detective story with plenty of suspects and strong character development for its genre. Very few indications that the author does not live in Britain. However, The attempt to portray a British Asian community shows she doesn't know any, and relies on sterotypes. Two tips for EG if she wants to include Asians again: read 'Finding a Voice - Asian Women in Britain' by Amrit Wilson; and don't believe everything your British police contacts tell you about illegal immigration.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deception On His Mind, 30 Aug 2004
I'm a fan of murder mystery and read this genre widely. I like the Inspector Lynley books but was absolutely delighted by this storyline and content. The Asian communities in England are not often written about but this seemed very perceptive.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Painfully anachronistic, 28 Dec 2007
I think Elizabeth George is one of the better writers in the genre, despite not being native to the culture she writes about. I overlooked some of the mistakes in slang and customs in the earlier books, but by this stage in the series one expects better. Who in God's name describes Pakistanis as "coloureds" in the 1990s? It's like an Alf Garnett programme, only the makers of those would probably not have mistaken Hindus for Muslims. Just as I wince every time I read Winston Nkata's name (why would a police constable - or indeed any young man in the 1980s or 1990s - have a West Indian first name and an African surname?) I cringed at every scene involving second generation Pakistanis. I know she can do better than this - What Came Before He Shot Her is a brilliant, extended piece of social observation - but this is a miserable, embarrassing example of what happens when you fail to do your research and write instead from a considerable distance.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars unrealistic, 22 Sep 1999
By A Customer
A writer muzst alwasy be careful when writing about a culture she's not familiar with - no amount of research can cover the little mistakes. For instance, no Pakistani would refer to him/herself as an Asian - lumping all Asians together under this word, Only non-Asians do that! A Pakistani would refer to himself and his people specifically as Pakistanis. (Or would an Englishman, discussing his own compatriots, refer to them as "we Europeans"?) Also, she often brings in Hindu habits into the Muslim world. As such, the whole plot falls flat.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Intelligent page turning thriller, 28 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Deception on His Mind (Hardcover)
In this novel, Barbara Havers takes centre stage rather than sharing the detection activity with Inspector Lynley.
As usual with Elisabeth George novels, the focus of the book is split between the development of the characters (in this case Havers growing friendship with her nextdoor neighbour and his niece). The murder plot deals with a potentially racially motivated murder in a seaside town.
When I began reading this book, I thought that it may have been a disappointment as Lynley was not involved. However, the plot is tense and the characters finely drawn.
I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys thrillers - it is not necessary to have read any of the other books in this series as the plot and characters are easy to follow.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not her best title (warlockb@hotmail.com), 30 Nov 2004
By 
B. Jonsson "Literate Warlock" (falun, dalarna sweden) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Occurring in a pakistani culture in the south of England, this crime novel is different from most contemporary crime fiction.
Not many authors dare to involve ethnic minorities and prejudices against them as a theme in their books, both out of respect and fear of provoking people, but also out of ignorance.
Most Europeans don't know enough about our own next door neighbours, let alone anything about foreign cultures, even those assimilated into our own.
George seems a little disoriented herself. Thera are traces of
cultural prejudice against hindu culture, when in fact pakistanis are muslims.
However, the mistakes -or misconceptions- are slight and do not change the fact that this is a book well worth reading! You should never give persons credit for more than they are and Elisabeth George is not an ethnology expert.She is however a brilliant author.
Havers growing relationships with the girl next door, birthday parties and dinners with her father, leads her to be involved in a case off from her usual territories. The usually so disrespectful, working class hero, meets her match in the female officer leading the investigation. A career
opportunist with, as it seems, a hidden agenda in the case. Soon, their strong wills collide and Havers has her hands full only to stay afloat. When her friendly neighbour turns up as an interpreter and it is clear that Havers knows him, disaster is imminent and the final occurencies brings herself to be an outcast, perhaps a criminal..
The story is tightly woven, the pakistani community and their views of the English and vice versa plausible (given the above marks). The Romeo-Juliet theme evident with all it's complications of forbidden love, hatred and desire. George again proves herself to be not only a first class crime fiction writer, but a first class writer all genres.
A book to enjoy and to strongly recommend!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping mystery!, 28 Jan 2014
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This review is from: Deception on His Mind (Inspector Lynley) (Paperback)
Really enjoyed George's novel Deception on His Mind. Inspector Lynley wasn't in this novel but this didn't detract from the story. I found the setting of Essex very interesting as I used to live in the area. This was the only book of hers I hadn't read (except the new book 2013).
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Good Yarn, 12 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Deception on His Mind (Inspector Lynley) (Paperback)
I like Elizabeth George as a writer anyway, but this story dealt with some contentious issues of race etc in a very clever way. As well as that, it was such a good story that I didn't begin to guess "who done it" until nearly the end.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Inspector Lynley without Inspector Lynley, 9 Oct 2013
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An Inspector Lynley where Inspector Lynley made no appearance, and actually this one was all the better for it. Barbara Havers gets to take centre stage, and I enjoyed that - I had got really very bored with the Lynley/Helen relationship and the whole thing about Deborah and her husband not being able to have children was getting me down, so it was refreshing. There were all the usual things in this that annoy me - principally some of the writing and tone is VERY patronising - but there were all the usual things in it that keep brining me back. I had a think about what they were, since I rarely give this series more than 3 stars, so for what it's worth:

- good, solid, old-fashioned police crime stories with no blood and guts and lots of detective work
- interesting crimes, that are gritty, don't shy away from controversial subjects
- the politics of policing
- alternative points of view. I like this in particular, because you get to see inside the minds of the various suspects and other characters, you get to have one up on the police at various points, and yet you are still kept guessing. Which leads me to the last point
- really well-written whodunnits that tax your mind.

So I will be reading the next one soon, and I'm really hoping that poor Barbara doesn't have the book thrown at her after the ending of this one, though I suspect she will.
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Deception on His Mind (Inspector Lynley)
Deception on His Mind (Inspector Lynley) by Elizabeth George (Paperback - 2 Aug 2012)
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