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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dud a Chum?
The second book in the greatest series of books ever written in my opinion. The first book did just enough to hold my attention and make me wonder what might happen, but this, this book catapulted me into full fledged Dark Tower addiction. Whilst in this particular instalment (if one was being perfectly honest) not a much happens, it is one of those books you cannot put...
Published on 30 Mar 2004 by jonabruno

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Character over story
I've been a Stephen King fan for years but only picked up The Gunslinger at the end of '09. While the first book in the Dark Tower series was a quick, fun read based around a Clint Eastwood style cowboy, book two headed in a very different direction.

Book one gave glimpses that many realities existed in this world, including our own and The Drawing of the Three...
Published on 26 May 2010 by David Bowers


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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dud a Chum?, 30 Mar 2004
The second book in the greatest series of books ever written in my opinion. The first book did just enough to hold my attention and make me wonder what might happen, but this, this book catapulted me into full fledged Dark Tower addiction. Whilst in this particular instalment (if one was being perfectly honest) not a much happens, it is one of those books you cannot put down. By the end of it your most likely response will be “woo, that was great, but what happened?”
The story is basically a continuation of Roland of Gilead’s journey, almost entirely set on a beach with wandering lobstrocities (Dad a Chack?) and doors set into nothing! King continues developing the wonderful character that is Roland, whilst he draws the 3 the title demands. The drawing of the three ensures Roland’s band of pilgrims is as wonderfully diverse as possible with the drawing of a motor mouth heroine addict and a schizophrenic black girl from different times of ‘our’ New York. A wonderful twist at the end leaves you yearning for the third instalment.
I cannot rate this book high enough, if you enjoy extremely well written fantasy adventure stories, you must continue with the journey towards the Dark Tower. It will make you laugh, make you think but most of all it will sap several hours of joyous time and transport you into Roland’s world.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Possibly the best in the series, 6 Jun 2005
It's the 1980's, Stephen King is at the peak of his career, we've already had The Stand, Salems Lot, Carrie and of course The Gunslinger. Now King turns his attention once more to the Dark Tower, and this time he's doing it in style. DOTT comes packed full of intense and hardcore action. From the beginning Roland comes under attack by beasts he calls 'lobstrosities'. But this book also introduces two new characters, who will in event join Roland on his epic quest. These are neurotic, class clown, heroin junkie Eddie Dean, and Schizophrenic, wheel-chair bound Oddeta Homes/ Detta Walker. Undoubtedly the greatest additon is that of Eddie, he is a perfectly well rounded character who offers laugh-out-loud comedy as well as heart wrenching drama. Yet Detta Walker, Oddetas dark-half will having you cursing in frustration as you watch the others struggle through there journey. Finally the conclusion to this book will have you feeling light-hearted and full of relief that is until you read the next, and arguably superior installment of the DT series, the Wastelands...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best Stephen King "other world" since The Talisman., 17 Sep 2000
By A Customer
The Dark Tower series follows Roland of Gilead, the last Gunslinger or Knight of the Old World in his quest for the Dark Tower. Throughout, his past and motives are slowly being revealed. The world through which he travels is in some ways reminiscent of our own, and the implications of the similarities just keep growing..... An absolutely superb, ongoing story from the master storyteller. Highly recommended, and please do read the books in the right order - it's worth it!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superior sequel!, 1 Sep 2006
By 
marky77 (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
A lot of readers of the first Dark Tower novel, The Gunslinger, said that they found the book very boring or that they couldn't finish it. I enjoyed it BUT IT IS NOT AS GOOD AS THE SEQUELS. If you did not enjoy the first Dark Tower book please try this one before dismissing the series as it is much better than the first.
Three new charactors are added in this novel: Eddie, a heroin addict and Odetta Holmes/Detta Walker a black schizophrenic woman in a weelchair.
Odetta is a wealthy, lovely women and Detta is her psychotic counterpart. Both women are unaware of the others existence.
Odetta/Detta is a very interesting charactor and Eddie often had me laughing out loud.
King adds elements of horror into this novel such as the Psychotic Detta and the lobstrosities.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars And the quest continues..., 19 Aug 2006
By 
Chris Hall "DLS Reviews" (Cardiff, Wales) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
`The Drawing Of The Three' is the second instalment in the epic `Dark Tower' fantasy series. The story runs for a total of 450 pages within the 3712 pages the entire series spans for, taking the reader firmly into the saga of the gunslinger Roland and the barren world King has created.

This second novel deals with introducing Roland's newly found companions, interweaving their stories within different periods of time, with the aid of magical doorways. The novel manages to cover essential ground for the continuation of the series, giving the reader further insight into the quest at hand.

King's characterization of these newly introduced characters is superb. Ok, so that is really the main purpose and thrust behind this second novel, but it really is a truly captivating read from start to finish. With the schizophrenic Odetta Holmes (whose evil split personality is named Detta Holmes) immediate similarities can be made with that of Gollum in JRR Tolkien's `Lord Of The Rings' novels. But once King begins to explore the character within the book, you find that the character is in no way copied or cloned from that of Gollum. King has managed to produce a unique and beautifully original double-character that injects a dark tension into this developing tale.

I am aware that many readers opinions are that this novel is really the first part to the Dark Tower series, with "The Gunslinger" merely serving as a prologue. I can understand that view but in reflection I somewhat disagree. Both books serve as a great platform to begin this epic saga with, setting the scene and introducing the characters beautifully, whilst still delivering individual storylines to keep the reader entertained.

The book includes an eight page Introduction by King written in January 2003 that also appears in `The Gunslinger'. At the end of the book there is a 10 page excerpt taken from the beginning of the third book in the series `The Waste Lands'.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful fantasy from King, 6 Mar 2004
Although originally published seven years later, The Drawing of the Three takes up the story right where The Gunslinger ended. According to the oracle’s prophesy Roland must now find three persons to accompany him on his road to the Dark Tower. The book is divided into three big sections, each dedicated to the finding of one these persons, but they are cleverly interconnected and the main story line is progressing all the way through the book.
In many ways this book is quite different from The Gunslinger. The remoteness in the narrative is gone, there are fewer flashbacks, and very little in the way of speculation about what the ultimate goal is. It also has a quicker pace, with truly breathtaking action sequences, and some exceptional plot twists. Overall I felt this work was more mature, and more in line with King’s writing in general, at the same time as it has an excellent fantasy background.
King claims that the Dark Tower is inspired mainly by Tolkien and Sergio Leone, but after finishing The Drawing of the Three I definitely have the feeling that he also has read one or two books by Stephen Donaldson. Some of the same ideas that are the foundation of Donaldson’s writing are evident here too, especially the flawed, unwilling hero concept, and there was at least one detail that instantly reminded me of The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant.
The similarity to Donaldson does in no way affect my judgment negatively. This is King at his best, and fantasy at its finest – I give The Drawing of the Three all 5 stars available.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The dark tower is king at his best, 9 Feb 2004
By 
Mr N Maunder (Flixton, Manchester United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
If you read the first book of the dark tower series and like me were not much impressed, you will be amazed at how good the drawing of the three is.
This is king at his best, with strong characters, a fast pace, and most importantly a story that will leave you guessing until the very end it enbodies all that stephen king should be.
The plot moves along considerably from the first book adding new characters that shape enough story to keep the readers interest for several volumes yet.
If like many you have felt let down be some of kings endings you will not be let down here.
This is a book you can't put down and it will leave you waiting eagerly for more.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars lobstrocities, 28 Dec 2003
The Gunslinger left Roland at the edge of the Western Sea after awaking from his long sleep. As the title suggests, Roland, using doors along the Beach must now draw his Ka-tet members from different whens in New York to help him on his quest for the tower.
So, the book splits into sections as he draws each person.This book is different in both style and substance to The Gunslinger. King admitted himself that he was trying too hard whilst writing the former so, at times it is a little hard to read. This is probably why King has re-written the former and filled it out a little.
In this installment we are introduced to Eddie Dean from New York, the interaction between Eddie and Roland throughout all the books is fantastic, Eddie is a weak drug addict struggling with personal demons (like all King characters!)and Rolands arrival in his world leads to some terrific scenes. Also, there is a good element of humour, as Roland attempts to understand modern technology and New york way of life.
Next up is the split personality of Detta Walker/ Odetta. As previous reviewers have stated, this part of the book in my opinion isn't as good, but King shows off his skils here by putting into writing an extremley difficult topic to portrait.
Through the Final door is the frightening desk job worker/ serial killer Jack Mort. The installment of the book is chilling as the link between Mort and other characters in the series is shown. To say any more would spoil the suspence.
The book shows Roland at his best, as an insticitive survivor, who knows exactly how to handle difficult situations. Eddie is slightly annoying in this installment, but it is good in a way because it shows in the later books just how far he has come on. The relationship between the two is fantastic as they are bound to each other by the Tower but are completely different to one another at this stage.
In comparison to The Gunslinger, this book tells us a lot less about the actual Tower or Rolands' past but instead pushes the story forward in a real sense by assembling some of the Ka-tet and forwarding their journey towards the Tower along the edge of the Western Sea.
Two other things of note here are the monsters that live in the sea, the terrifying Lobstrocities and some subtle references to other King novels.
I can't reccomend this book enough, bar Wizard and Glass this is my favorite King book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A review by someone who enjoys the books., 26 Jun 2003
Although the first in the series (''The gunslinger'') was less interesting, this edition really draws the reader into Roland of Gilead's world. Roland discovers himself on a beach somewhere he knows not and, as he progresses along the beach in search of his elusive dark tower, he finds three doors, that are in fact portals into our world. Three times he goes through and three times he finds himself in the mind of that whom he must draw. The ending is climatic and overall the story is worth whatever price laid upon it, being a compelling read and wonderful tale.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Behind closed doors, 4 Dec 2002
After the slightly poor first book the second book ‘The Drawing of the Three’ is pretty damn good! Roland has to ‘draw’ three people from another world (our world actually) to aid him on his quest for the Dark Tower.
For the first 200 pages or so, this book is pretty much un-put-down-able. The account of ‘drawing’ Eddie Dean is high octane stuff, so it’s a bit of an anticlimax when the tale switches to the ‘drawing’ of the second person. Still, the finale, the ‘non-drawing’ of the third person, makes up for the - dare I say it - boring middle section and the book finishes as blisteringly fast paced as it started.
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The Dark Tower: The Drawing of the Three Bk. II
The Dark Tower: The Drawing of the Three Bk. II by Stephen King (Paperback - 16 Feb 2012)
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