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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Informative but wordy!
A comprehensive guide to Christian Theology. A warning to students who are new to systematic Theology. This book is wordy and not for the faint of heart.
Published 9 months ago by Laurie

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14 of 29 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Should students of theology be averse to facts?
"Christian Theology: An Introduction" is a well-known textbook by Prof. Alister McGrath of King's College, London. Its popularity during nearly 20 years can be attributed in part to its clarity of writing and presentation, its comprehensiveness, and its balance when presenting conflicting opinions within Christianity.
The principal market for a textbook of theology...
Published 18 months ago by Michael D. Reynolds


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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent resource tool, 7 Dec 2012
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This review is from: Christian Theology: An Introduction (Paperback)
Used this as part of my studying for theology degree. One of this books sat on the end of my desk in near reach. Book is well written and very easy to use and understand
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14 of 29 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Should students of theology be averse to facts?, 27 Dec 2012
This review is from: Christian Theology: An Introduction (Paperback)
"Christian Theology: An Introduction" is a well-known textbook by Prof. Alister McGrath of King's College, London. Its popularity during nearly 20 years can be attributed in part to its clarity of writing and presentation, its comprehensiveness, and its balance when presenting conflicting opinions within Christianity.
The principal market for a textbook of theology is seminaries and other religious institutions. For the intellectual and emotional comfort of both the author and the devout reader--and for potential readers to buy the book--a textbook of theology has to ignore or minimize negative aspects of the set of beliefs it expounds. But the effect of this is that one purpose of the book becomes to sustain a false view of history. McGrath's textbook treats at length the histories of the Christian religion, the Christian churches, and their major doctrines. So it is appropriate to inquire whether the theologian observes the standards of the historian. And the answer in general is "no." A few of many examples follow.
McGrath does not discuss how scholars have demonstrated that "The New Testament" was rewritten in many places (by altering, inserting, or deleting text) to harmonize previously discordant texts, to support sectarian doctrines, and to authorize doctrines developed after the original writing. Some of these changes are acknowledged in many modern editions of the work.
The essential specific doctrines of Christianity: the divinity of Jesus, the Trinity, the Incarnation, the Eucharist, the sacrificial and redemptive character of Jesus' death, and the Resurrection--all were proposed after Jesus' life, and all were disputed, sometimes for centuries. McGrath acknowledges the existence of dissent during the formative period of Christianity, but he gives only a fragmented view of how all the eventual orthodox ideas of the religion were not present from the outset but were developed over time. He does not disclose how personal, social, and political circumstances influenced these doctrines. These are facts that bear upon the credibility of Christian theology itself.
McGrath allows, "It seems to be a general rule of the development of Christian doctrine that development is occasioned by controversy." "The New Testament" demonstrates the disharmony of Jesus' followers at the beginning stages of the religion. Early on, one finds disputing sects expressing their disagreement in vituperative, insulting and hate-filled language. But throughout his book, when McGrath mentions past and present quarrels about theology, he gives no more than hints of how often they are intense, rancorous, divisive, and sometimes accompanied by violence. By minimizing the controversy and discord that existed in whatever matter he is presenting, he makes Christianity seem like a more convivial enterprise than it actually was--and is.
One of the four defining components of Christian theology listed by McGrath is how the ideas of the religion affect people's behavior. He discusses theology in relation to various social and political topics. But he leaves the reader in ignorance about the more important subjects of Christianity's justification of and connivance with despotic governments, its support of slavery, the Crusades, the Witch Hunts, and the Wars of Religion.
McGrath writes, "The ideas of 'orthodoxy' and 'heresy' are especially associated with the early church." This is incorrect. Beginning in the 12th century, the identification and elimination of suspected heretics became a principal activity of the Western Christian Church. An extensive organization, the Inquisition, was created for that purpose. A new legal system, with new principles that did not include justice, was devised to prosecute supposed heretics. McGrath does not mention this institution, which for centuries dominated the social, political, and intellectual life of much of Europe.
A person ignorant of Christianity would come away from reading "Christian Theology" with a highly distorted idea of the religion. Evidently this is the picture of themselves that Christians want to present to themselves. Should students of theology be averse to facts?
Christian Theology: An IntroductionChristian Theology: An IntroductionChristian Theology: An IntroductionThe Christian Theology Reader: AND Christian Theology, 4r.edChristian Theology: An IntroductionChristian Theology: An IntroductionChristian Theology: An Introduction
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5 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, 22 Mar 2012
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This review is from: Christian Theology: An Introduction (Paperback)
This book has helped me through my studies at Angia Ruskin University! I am now a converted christian and stopped me from commiting suiside!
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars In Depth and excellent, 15 Jan 2013
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Whilst some theological books are difficult to read, McGrath here has the credibility of a scholar, but also understandability and readability. Great book for study.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Book, 1 Sep 2013
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Once again, bought as birthday gift for son in law - it was what he asked for and so I assume he's happy with it.
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4 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars books for uni, 22 Sep 2011
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i ordered this as part of my uni course for theology it arrived in good time and was very resonably priced. overall very happy with my purchase.
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2 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars CHRISTIAN THEOLOGY, 9 Oct 2011
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Came very quick ,was in good condition,well packed good ordering system,satisfied with all.suggest that you allow customer to choose how many words to produce.
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0 of 18 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A GD LAUGH, 18 Dec 2013
This review is from: Christian Theology: An Introduction (Paperback)
WHY IN ART IS CHRIST PORTRAYED AS AN ANGELIC FAIR HAIR .BLUE EYED MAN? HE WAS AN ARAB AND IN REALITY HE MOST PROB LOOKED LIKE BIN LADEN.WHY ANYONE WOULD WANT TO WORSHIP ANYONE FROM THIS TROUBLED REGION OF THE WORLD WHO LIVED OVER 2000 AGO IS A MYSTERY.WHEN FOSSILS OF SEAW CREATURES ARE FOUND ON TOP OF MOUNT EVEREST THIS RELIGON IS JUST A BLIP IN THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD
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Christian Theology: An Introduction
Christian Theology: An Introduction by Alister E. McGrath (Paperback - 24 Sep 2010)
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