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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Plato's natural philosophy and the Atlantis myth
I bought this like most other people to read about the Atlantis myth and for anyone interested in either the myth or Plato's natural philosophy this is an important work.

The Criteas is a short fragment of a dialogue where the Atlantis myth originates. He puts the story in a historical context by talking of the discoveries made by Solon on his travels in Egypt,...
Published on 25 Sep 2008 by Andrew Dalby

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Satis for what it is ! A reasonable translation.
Timaeus was never one of Plato's crowd pullers ! though very influential with later mathematical-mystical thinkers. There are some
parts of general interest however, and this book offers the chance to read these, and as much of the more convoluted matter as
pleases you, in clear English, without any financial investment that hurts ! I read it 55 years ago for...
Published 11 months ago by Herodotus


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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Plato's natural philosophy and the Atlantis myth, 25 Sep 2008
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Andrew Dalby "ardalby" (oxford) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Timaeus and Critias (Paperback)
I bought this like most other people to read about the Atlantis myth and for anyone interested in either the myth or Plato's natural philosophy this is an important work.

The Criteas is a short fragment of a dialogue where the Atlantis myth originates. He puts the story in a historical context by talking of the discoveries made by Solon on his travels in Egypt, but it is not clear if it is allegorical or that this is a real history. Most of the story is a description of the Island and then an account of their conflict with other peoples and final destruction and fall. The story ends abruptly and we do not see the final moral of the story because the rest of the dialogue is lost.

The Timaeus is Plato's work on natural sciences. He was not an experimentalist and so his theories are based on theory and observation. There is the discussion of the elemental particles, which would come to be known as the Platonic solids as well as some view on medicine and health. For Plato the metaphysical laws of philosophy are well established, whereas natural philosophy is difficult. This is perhaps the opposite to the view we would have today.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Timaeus from a Process Perspective, 22 Nov 2012
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I finally got round to reading Timaeus and now appreciate where Arthur North Whitehead got the inspiration to collate his 1930's Gifford Lectures into his book, 'Process and Reality'. The theme of an Organic Philosophy comes out right from the earliest parts of Timaeus.
I was mildly irritated by the translator's disparaging comment about the neo-platonists, since the Process comunity has its origins in neo-platonism, obviously with a modern world view both in science and theology. Other than that, I can definitely recomend this book.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Satis for what it is ! A reasonable translation., 25 Aug 2013
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Herodotus (Kingston, Surrey, UK) - See all my reviews
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Timaeus was never one of Plato's crowd pullers ! though very influential with later mathematical-mystical thinkers. There are some
parts of general interest however, and this book offers the chance to read these, and as much of the more convoluted matter as
pleases you, in clear English, without any financial investment that hurts ! I read it 55 years ago for exams, more fun this time !!
For easier Plato (with intriguing picture of Socrates) you can try The Apology,, The Symposium, the first parts of The Phaedo,,
and the Republic itself. (They raise lots of questions and challenges for the thoughtful reader)..
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars dream, 29 Mar 2010
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This review is from: Timaeus and Critias (Paperback)
this book cane to me in a dream and is about to change my life!!!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars great, 23 Jan 2011
Not like new. It was new and came with a note, making this online shopping more humane. Thanks a lot!
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars atlantis theory, 14 Nov 2013
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a present for someone else but have read very informative.if I am writing the review then I decide
how many words it needs
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5 of 21 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Everything you always wanted to know about Atlantis..., 27 April 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Timaeus and Critias (Paperback)
If you are planning to read any other books on Atlantis, and think you might get involved in discussions on the subject, this is the book to read first. All the other books borrow at least some of their material from it, and it is the definitive starting point. Plato describes the mythical lost land in great detail.
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Timaeus and Critias
Timaeus and Critias by Plato . (Paperback - 20 May 2009)
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