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54 Reviews
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64 of 68 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Comprehensive, accessible, life changing!
It's a crime that I am the first on Amazon's uk site to review this! I only bought it having seen the rage reviews on Amazon US, and this book turned out to deserve such reviews.

This book is laid out incredibly well, with a true simplicity which is apt for a buddhist manual. The use of bullet points and clear distinctions between which sections concern the...
Published on 23 April 2010 by N. Harris

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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars easy to pick up, too easy to drop
Two stars, because several people find Buddha's Brain helpful; plus it gives several interesting facts about how suffering arises, how meditation affects the brain, and so on. But as a meditation practitioner and scientist for several years I have concerns:
Buddha's Brain offers "to weave together information and methods like an operating manual for your brain...
Published on 6 Dec 2011 by GGirl PhD


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64 of 68 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Comprehensive, accessible, life changing!, 23 April 2010
By 
N. Harris - See all my reviews
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It's a crime that I am the first on Amazon's uk site to review this! I only bought it having seen the rage reviews on Amazon US, and this book turned out to deserve such reviews.

This book is laid out incredibly well, with a true simplicity which is apt for a buddhist manual. The use of bullet points and clear distinctions between which sections concern the science, and which sections concern the practice, help you to relax and take it all in as you please rather than being force fed everything at once.

This book would be ideal for anybody that isn't too concerned with the more religious aspects of buddhism, that just wants to use it for it's clear and proven psychological benefits, not that it wouldn't be a wonderful book for any practitioner of buddhism to own. Follow the advice in this book and you will improve mentally in every area in which it is possible to improve, and you will know exactly how and why it is working!
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50 of 53 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A valuable book, 24 July 2010
This book is a valuable read. The subject matter is clearly presented and well written, and justified itself well to me. I didn't buy this book for 'enlightenment', but strangely enough I did have some 'lightbulb moments' whilst reading it - this was a pleasant and unexpected outcome for me. I am looking forward to re-reading it and that says it all.
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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must buy, 7 Nov 2010
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I was initially intimidated by the title, feeling that anything neuroscience would leave me out of my depth; but on the contrary it provided captivating and accessible insight into how cultivating positive emotions can resculp the brain. This book put many missing pieces of the puzzle together. I was engrossed and didn't want it to end. I look forward to re-reading it.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding application of science and Buddhist philosophy, 8 Feb 2011
Simply put, this is a neat, informative and evocative illumination of the theories in Buddhism being put into practice.

It is more of a science book than a religious one - and Buddhism itself often veers more into personal philosophy than most conventional religions. The mix in this book is a perfect link between the two: No Buddhist mantra, idea or concept is put forward without either rigorously scientific neurologic understanding being explained to back it up. And conversely, we are taught much about the human mind and its possibilities - why we anger, how we react - and are led into an analysis of what Buddhist traits, exercises or ideas can evoke the change you would want in that area.

So, what you get is a balanced book. I cannot find a flaw with it. I have a deep interest in psychology and [Zen] Buddhism and I found the idea of marrying the two to be intriguing, but I expected the outcome to be dry, or preachy. Fortunately, a lot of Buddhism is fairly unique to how the individual chooses to act; and it's written with a sensitivity to difficult concepts and an attention to phrasing that just transcends the obvious trap of getting caught up in the stuffy implication that a "scientific analysis of Buddhist belief" might otherwise imply. What is most shocking about this book isn't that it is occasionally funny, or makes you gasp out loud in remarkable sudden understanding, or even that it sways religion and science together to the point where they seem unified, not in opposition: The shocking thing about this book is that it is downright charming, in every chapter, in every way, from its subject matter, to its lessons, to its sometimes surprisingly poetic vocabulary.

I know the book's summary and contents imply it is all about the science of the mind and the relative science of Buddhism. That is a true statement. But really, this is a science textbook about the human soul, and how to achieve the best result and state of being from it: with gentle, kind, contemplation that this book will guide you through.

It is as organic, flexible and authoritative as you could hope it to be.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Helpful, Hopeful and Inspiring, 13 Aug 2010
A wonderful and inspiring read - accessible, practical, supportive. It helped me really "get" why certain simple meditation and Buddhist practices can literally change your brain bit by bit. and be integrated into your life. I'm familiar with Buddhist teachings and meditation practice, but for me the blend of latest neuropsychology with it has helped me really shape and direct my practice in a helpful and positive way.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buddha's Brain, 8 Nov 2011
Having studied Buddhism I found this book very informative as to how meditation works. Anyone interested in wanting a clamer more peaceful life should read it and follow the meditation. It really works.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars brainy mindfulness, 16 Sep 2011
By 
George Clark "George Clark" (Portsoy, Scotland) - See all my reviews
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Controlled, informative and gently amusing. This book seamlessly ties together stuff from neurology, evolutionary psychology and mindfulness meditation. I am an erstwhile biology teacher and long term meditator. There were several times when I gasped with the delighted surprize of 'of course'. Rick makes it all seem so obvious and straightforward. A useful and delightful book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At last, an accessible well researched book on how Dharma practice can change 'you' for the better., 27 Jan 2013
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I have a science background and I'm also practicing the Dharma. I thought this book draws on many research articles pertaining to neuroscience and was excellently written! This book will help one to understand how we cause ourselves 'secondary' dukka or unsatisfactoriness in our lives so that we can learn new ways of thinking, acting and being with our experience to help us become happier. It does not present quick fixes, but rather a re-orientation in how we can use Buddhist principles and practice in our daily lives coming from a standpoint, based in evidence of how our brains work.

I think it is a superb book!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Buddha's Brain, 20 Jun 2011
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I have read and re-read this book as I have found it so helpful to understand the way that neuroscience has progressed to help us understand how and why we do things, not necessarily in our own / or others interests on an objective level ( think war,hatred,fear and anger just for starters). The perspective is both scientific and from the view of Buddhism and I would recommend it to anyone with an interest in either or both. I have particularly found it helpful to give an optimistic view of the human brain and its workings and to give a basically positive view of humanity and particularly an optimistic and practical way to progress as an individual. I have read fairly widely in neuroscience over the past few years and have found this book to be very impressive from the neuroscientific perspective in bringing together recent thinking and developments in that area, but with the added Buddhist perspective which is practical in its helpful ideas and accessible to non- Buddhists and Buddhists alike.
I would recommend it to anyone with an interest in understanding the workings of the brain and hepful and practical ways to help oneself. Although called Buddha's Brain I believe that it would be informative and helpful to a reader from any or no religious persuasion.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding: Should be a classic, 13 Jun 2013
By 
R. R. Patel (Netherlands) - See all my reviews
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This book answers all of the questions I have asked myself: what is happiness? Is it an internal or external thing? How do we achieve it? Where does our mind get in the way of the brain?

I was already aware of many of the answers because of my study of Buddhism. This book, however, laid it all out brilliantly, convincingly, and concisely. It also verifies them with as much scientific proof as you could ever need. Finally, it also answers some of the niggling questions that I think come with being a Westerner introduced to a completely antithecal viewpoint of the world, as outlined by the Buddha. What about the pleasures we already have? Where is "the Middle Way" exactly?

In short, I will always be grateful to this book for potentially voiding the need for me to go study neuroscience and find out the mysteries of the brain for myself.

Read this book if you want happiness, want to understand how the brain works, AND to develop a completely new take on life, ranging from our smallest thoughts, to our day-to-day activities, to finally the way our societies are shaped.

And if you aren't already, start meditating.
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Buddha's Brain: The Practical Neuroscience of Happiness, Love & Wisdom
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