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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good thriller
Connelly breaks away from his highly-accomplished Bosch series to tell the tale of a reporter Jack McEvoy who's brother (a detective) has apparently taken his own life. McEvoy eventually works out it was homicide, sees links to other suspicious cases and convinces the FBI there's a serial killer at work (lines from poems by Edgar Allan Poe are found on all the victims -...
Published on 13 Jun 2008 by Fergal Woods

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Terrible Ending.
I was really enjoying this book. It was well written with interesting characters and I was loving the Edgar Allen Poe part to the plot. Then the story wrapped itself up and there was still 5 chapters to read. I wish that I had stopped reading right there. The big twist, which I won't give away, completely ruined the book for me. It just didn't fit. The complex plot was...
Published on 10 Oct 2010 by Amazon Customer


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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good thriller, 13 Jun 2008
By 
Fergal Woods "Axe Victim" (Leitrim, Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Connelly breaks away from his highly-accomplished Bosch series to tell the tale of a reporter Jack McEvoy who's brother (a detective) has apparently taken his own life. McEvoy eventually works out it was homicide, sees links to other suspicious cases and convinces the FBI there's a serial killer at work (lines from poems by Edgar Allan Poe are found on all the victims - hence the nickname) He then inveigles his way into the investigation.

The story fairly rattles along giving good insight into the world of tabloid reporters,as well as the skills used in the Bureau task force. Tension builds up nicely as the force gets closer to the killer, and twists and false trails abound.Many of these are predictable, and the ending is a little too convenient. Despite obvious cliches this is still a very good read and is strongly recommended.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pacey!!, 20 Aug 2007
By 
I enjoyed 'The Poet' because it had a very strong 'can't put downable' quality. It had a fast pace and it was exciting to read.

'The poet' was the second book I read written by Michael Connelly (the first being 'The Lincoln Lawyer') because having read one of his books, I concluded that he wrote well. In this sense, 'The Poet' didn't dissappoint. Connelly writes clearly and is able to keep the reader in suspense throughout the book. Connelly creates characters and their personalities well - he gives the characters that 'likeable' quality - which adds to the story. The plot is exciting and is clear enough to be understandable but is still able to suprise the reader, using twists and turns.

I enjoyed reading 'The poet' - it entertained me and was able to do so throughout the book (despite the fact that it is fairly lengthy, I was kept in suspense throughtout). I would reccomend this book to people who enjoy thrillers and books with a fast pace. Perhaps people who are keen on James Patterson but maybe feel like 'slight change of scenary!'
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The plot reads like a winding road..., 14 July 2004
By 
Mr. J. H. Stokes "jstokes42" (London, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Poet (Paperback)
constantly changing direction of thought for both the hero of the novel and the reader. It is one of those books that gets you inside the head of the main character and really care what happens to both himself and his colleagues as well as giving you a desperate urge to join him in catching the baddie.
Connelly is very similar, and in my view, an equal writer to Kellerman. His plots thicken and make their way to almost unbelievable endings.
The poet is right up there with his best works. However, I still rate 'concrete blonde' as his finest piece. If you have never read Connelly, I suggest you start right now.
Incidentally, this book even has a sequel with a real twist at the end!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Terrible Ending., 10 Oct 2010
This review is from: The Poet (Paperback)
I was really enjoying this book. It was well written with interesting characters and I was loving the Edgar Allen Poe part to the plot. Then the story wrapped itself up and there was still 5 chapters to read. I wish that I had stopped reading right there. The big twist, which I won't give away, completely ruined the book for me. It just didn't fit. The complex plot was suddenly thrown away for a ridiculous ending that was completely alien to the first three quarters of the novel. This was the first Micheal Connelly book that I've read and I don't think that I will buy another.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Well Read Serial Killer, 26 Oct 1999
By 
M. Weaver (West Sussex) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
"The Poet" is an enjoyable read. Unlike some of the other reviewers, I didn't find the pace dipping or the ending too predictable. But this may be because the detective genre is not one that I read too often. It seems to me though that the book delivers on most counts. My only gripe is the relationship between the main character Jack and the FBI agent Rachel. That a cynical hack and a control-freak can fall head-over-heals in love quite so quickly is a little bit incredible. But don't let that put you off. The book's worth the cover price.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A bit disappointing..., 26 Aug 2011
This review is from: The Poet (Paperback)
After all the hype (better than silence of the lambs etc) I had expected much more.
The book starts slowly and takes forever to get going.
The hero definitely needs anti-depressants - ok I know he had lost his twin, but I was beginning to feel depressed too. Maybe if it wasn't in the first person?
I found the hero Jack to be unlikeable and this was a big problem. He seemed to have no personality, he was just a big glump - I couldn't understand why anyone would fall for him. He just whinged on all the time. And such a klutz - he kept going around accusing all the wrong people! Doesn't this guy think anything through?
The twists and turns at the ending were very clever, but ultimately unsatisfying.
Connelly has written much better.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not as pacy as Bosch, 2 Dec 2009
By 
This review is from: Poet (Mass Market Paperback)
After reading the excellent Lincoln Lawyer, I decided to start from the beginning and read the authors books in chronological order. The Poet is the fifth book by Micheal Connelly. While I didn't dislike this book, it's actually a pretty darn good yarn, I didn't love it. It's not as pacy as the Bosch books, but isn't that point? The Poet is differently paced and written to the Harry Bosch books because its something totally different.

As I have said I did enjoy this book. I felt that the storyline was really interesting with some great characters. Most of the book is told in first person via the main character, McEvoy, but it does alternate with the main 'villain' of the story, Gladden. These passages actually gave a really good variation of pace and perspective to the story. There are some really dire moments in the form of a couple of cringeworthy sex scenes, but thankfully these are few and far between! Another criticism that I have noticed from other reviews is the final twists. I'm not going to spoil it for anyone but I actually thought they were very good, yes, you do see one of them coming a mile off and the final twist may be too much for some, it made me laugh....in a good way, but most importantly it's entertaining. I'm sure Mr. Connelly will write another book featuring McEvoy, that will tie everything up.....what?...he has? Brilliant.

like I said I've started from the beginning of his books, so I've got quite a few more Bosch books to get through before I get to the Scarecrow. But all in all a very good read and one that I would recommend.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Poetry in slow motion, 4 Sep 2009
By 
Sam Quixote - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Poet (Paperback)
You know how some artists do their best work in their early years and then become pale shadows of themselves in later years? It hasn't happened to Michael Connelly. In fact I'd say the reverse is true. "The Poet" was published in 1996 and the other 4 Connelly books I've read are from 2006 onwards. So it was quite a shock when I expected the same frenetic pacing and superb writing Connelly has shown in recent books to be completely absent in this, one of his best loved books. His latest "The Scarecrow" is the second book to feature Jack McEvoy, the hero of "The Poet", and was a fantastic, gripping read, paced well, written convincingly, and was a joy.

"The Poet" is a bulkier book at around 480 pages compared to his usual count of 400 pages but feels much longer. McEvoy plods through police reports, interviews with witnesses and colleagues, before meeting up with the FBI and Agent Rachel Walling. From there is a similarly slow moving "chase" across the country to find "The Poet" before he kills again.

The book hasn't dated well either. Many references to modems, asking receptionists to do searches through archives (the days before Google - how did we manage?), pagers (before the widespread use of cell phones), all show the mid 90s era of it. It's not really a bad thing, it's quite quaint, but it does take you out of the story and at times is unintentionally humourous.

One of the things I noticed was that in the 21st century Connelly, he doesn't bother with sex scenes. A simple sentence "And then they made love" suffices in recent books like "Echo Park" (2006) and "The Scarecrow" (2009) whereas in "The Poet" we get agonisingly bad sex scenes with descriptions of "from here to eternity kisses" (p.331) and "My sense of Rachel was that she was craving the intimacy of the act, not as much the sensual pleasure as the closeness with another human being. It was that way for me as well, but I also found a deep carnal desire for her body." (p.265) followed by a description of Rachel breasts "she has wide and dark areolas on small breasts" (p.265). Eeeeergh. At least he's given up on such cringeworthy prose and settled down with a simple "And then they made love". Thank god.

What I mean is that of all of the features I love about Connelly's prose in modern classics as "The Lincoln Lawyer" and "Echo Park" is the directness of the writing and the focus of the story. This is rare in any writer, modern or classic, and the fact that Connelly can do this, seemingly effortlessly and well, highlights his extraordinary abilities as a writer. The real shame is that most of this is absent from "The Poet" and it shows Connelly in an early stage of honing his style. What's left is a thick, turgid book that's very easy to put down. Something I never thought I'd say about this author's work. Of course I'll continue reading his work, however first time readers to Michael Connelly would be better directed to some of his more recent work than this overrated novel.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent story with a disappointing ending, 8 Dec 2007
By 
OEJ - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
Michael Connelly is a crime fiction writer I rate very highly, and in this well-paced thriller - a departure from his Bosch series - he presents us with a carefully structured and thoroughly researched story about a multiple killer who traverses the nation over a period of some years and leaves a calling card in the form of quotations from the works of the 19th-century American poet Edgar Allan Poe.

I enjoyed everything about it except for the very end. With such an enjoyable build-up, and knowing that Connelly normally delivers the goods to the last page, it was something of a surprise and a disappointment to be given a slightly corny conclusion, one that was quite out of sorts with the solidity of all that had gone before. Very early in the tale I had a good idea that the identity of the Poet differed from the target everyone was chasing but I didn't mind that, I just looked forward to the revelation of who the Poet really was. When that moment came I felt a little short-changed because of a lack of explanation behind the motives of this highly intelligent serial killer. It's still a worthy read though, if not up to the standard of one of Connelly's later standalones THE LINCOLN LAWYER.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Monumental- I give this one 6 stars, 15 Aug 2000
By A Customer
Michael Connelly has quickly become one of my favorite writers. He demonstrates his extraordinary writing abilities time and time again. One of the things I like most about Connelly's work is the complexity of the plots and the fact that most books are connected in some way. The Poet is a high paced, intense and intelligent thriller about the hunt for a serial killer. Actually, in my opinion it's the best book Connelly has written so far although Bloodwork comes close. I've recommended The Poet to almost everyone I know and no one has been disappointed yet. If you're not familiar with Connelly's work you're in for a real treat.
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