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35 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading for health professionals
In his foreword George R Schwartz MD likens Blaylock's "Excitotoxins" book to Rachel Carson's pesticide expose of the 50's (Silent Spring), I fully endorse this reflection. Public opinion and now retailer awareness is getting into step with the facts and thoughts expressed in the pages of this book. In the UK, food retailer ASDA has removed Monosodium...
Published on 20 Nov. 1999 by geoff.brewer@clara.net

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12 of 29 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Very weak science
I bought this book because it mentions cysteine as an "excitotoxin," which is very much in contrast to cysteine being recommended as a dietary supplement (antioxidant) by other sources. My concern was that the dietary supplement industry is pushing substances that more knowledgeable researchers have found to be harmful. The good news is that there is...
Published on 5 Nov. 1998


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35 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading for health professionals, 20 Nov. 1999
This review is from: Excitotoxins (Paperback)
In his foreword George R Schwartz MD likens Blaylock's "Excitotoxins" book to Rachel Carson's pesticide expose of the 50's (Silent Spring), I fully endorse this reflection. Public opinion and now retailer awareness is getting into step with the facts and thoughts expressed in the pages of this book. In the UK, food retailer ASDA has removed Monosodium Glutamate (MSG E621) from it's own brand crisps and Iceland Frozen Foods has excluded the artificial sweetener aspartame (E951) from it's own brand products - hopefully others will follow these examples. Government must commission a scientific investigation on the whole range of "Excitotoxins". As a co-ordinator for a pressure group working in the "Excitotoxin" arena I am becoming aware of an increasing number of people who feel their health has been adversely affected by "Excitotoxins". Blaylock's book is very clear and understandable and in my opinion it should be essential reading for nutritionists and health professionals throughout the world.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, well researched reference., 31 May 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Excitotoxins (Paperback)
As a former food process engineer, I found the information is accurate, scientific and frightening. Easy to understand for the novice, yet extremely thorough scientifically. Excellent, anyone one who eats should read this. It's that important.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excitotoxins can cause Alzheimer's, ALS, and Parkinson's, 21 Jan. 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Excitotoxins (Paperback)
Russell L. Blaylock, MD, has written "Excitoxins: The Taste that Kills," in which he explains that certain amino acids when overly abundant in the brain can cause neurons to die. Many biochemicals can act as neurotransmitters in the brain -- some excite our neurons; others calm them. In particular, glutamate (in MSG), aspartate (in NutraSweet), and cysteine are three amino acids that can overexcite our neurons and cause them to die. These amino acids are called EXCITOTOXINS. They are now added in large amounts to our food supply. From NOHA NEWS, Vol. XX, No. 1, Winter 1995
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Detailed information that doesn't "talk down" to a person., 30 Aug. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Excitotoxins (Paperback)
Dr. Blaylock's sincere effort to provide the Excitotoxin sensitive person with accurate and detailed scientific information on the facts of MonoSodium Glutamate (MSG)and how it works; gives shocking facts about the dangers of MSG, with a vengance. The book does not "talk down" to people as other books about allergies and sensitivities often do. His information is always on the mark and clearly written. The Maryland Chapter of NO MSG strongly recommends "Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills" to all of its members; new and old.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must Read For Every Intelligent American, 4 Mar. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Excitotoxins (Paperback)
This is one of the most interesting and well-written books that I have read in a very long time. "Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills" introduces the subject matter and lays a solid foundation for understanding by the uninformed. It strives for fairness in its handling of the subject matter, offering up where some information may not be yet conclusive. Its thoroughness and scholastic credibility are testified to by more than 500 scientific references in its less than 300 pages of text. If every intelligent American were to read this book this year, the new millenium would be entered by a decidedly healthier populous, with drastically descending health care costs, a subsequently immediate boon to the economy, and an overall dramatically increased standard of living and quality of life.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book - real eye opener, 15 Oct. 2013
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This book is awesome. It starts off with a breakdown of how the brain works and it is obvious the author is an expert in this area. He has been a neurosurgeon for 30 years and a professor of neurology at more than one university. In addition he has written books and several peer-reviewed papers for journals. The fact that some don't find him credible is beyond me.

The rest of the book covers toxins that affect the brain and it is great reading. The worst bit is that most food companies are aware of the dangers from their additives but are able to meander the rules by renaming ingredients. The corporate-owned governing bodies do not care either. Worth a read if you care about the brains of yourselves and your family.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book should jar the reasonably sane mind to action., 4 Mar. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Excitotoxins (Paperback)
This book illuminates the dangers of our S.A.D (standard American diet) and the reckless and irresponsable and even murderous additions of additives to our food supply by the food processing and food service industry. Every man woman and child beware and act on your own behalf. As a child neurodevelopment specialist I am seeing hundreds of local children who's brains and psyche are injured and who are being labeled with disease names that bring no remediation of symptoms or treatment of causes. This book is only a start!
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5.0 out of 5 stars I always had my suspicions about aspartame, 20 Nov. 2011
By 
Mrs. M. F. Pearson "Finnol" (Northampton) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Excitotoxins (Paperback)
I suppose for people without post-A level Biology this book would be somewhat hard going. "Weak science" I think not; Dr Blaylock is an eminent neurosurgeon, although the book is a bit repetitive;it might be aimed at people who already have memory problems.

Aspartame was approved by the UK government so quickly that I assumed that HMG had shares in Searle. I soon discovered that aspartame did not assist weight loss & caused me headaches & lack of concentration. I gave it up & eventually switched to sucralose, but I had symptoms of Lupus & gave that up as well.

MSG & its fellow poisons were less familiar to me, but having read Harmony Clearwater Grace's book HCG Diet Made Simple: Your Step-By-Step Guide Beyond Pounds and Inches, I saw the connection between these products & damage to the diencephalon (pituitary, thalamus & hypothalamus. She points out that there is a connection between childhood obesity & MSG consumption in China, that even my husband noticed. On a trip to China recently, he noticed that the children he saw were significantly fatter than they were 10 years ago.

Dr Blaylock suggests that patients with disorders associated with neural damage "should eat a low-fat diet"; excuse me, but doesn't a low-fat diet mean MORE carbohydrates? not a good thing for these patients. He does so to reduce prostaglandins, which are produced from omega-6 fats e.g. sunflower, rapeseed oils. Better choices are saturated fats such as coconut oil & grass-fed butter; also supplementation with omega-3 oils such as fish oil & flaxseed oil are recommended. Coconut oil combined with a low-carb diet produces ketones, which are considered beneficial for Alzheimers' sufferers.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A very important message!, 14 Nov. 2010
This review is from: Excitotoxins (Paperback)
II found this book after getting interested in the side effects of MSG. Although I consider myself a well educated person, interested in healthy nutrition I will confess that I had never heard of this toxin. I knew vaguely that a taste enhancer existed but I had never heard the name! A while ago I came across it while reading a book Politically Incorrect Nutrition: Finding Reality in the Mire of Food Industry Propaganda and I felt that I needed a lot more information if I was ever going to be able to avoid it. I needed to know what it was exactly, where it is used and by what names. After reading the reviews on Amazon I decided to give Excitotoxins: the taste that kills a try. I was a bit worried about the fact that it seemed to be quite technical and yes, I struggled with that. What I was looking for was not really an extensive review of neurological illnesses but a more practical manual. Still... the message contained in this book is so important that it is worth the read. Maybe the author will consider writing a book for the average public in the future? I know he says that this is what he meant but knowing so much about the subject I don't think that he understands how much knowledge an average person can take! And, maybe with less repetitions? The book should also have been better edited. There are a few bad mistakes right in the beginning.

That aside the question is not as the author mentions at the end of the book: "Are we creating a nightmare world?" but more "Why are we creating a nightmare world?". I think that those answers must be somewhere but no one tells us and we really need to know. If they are messing up our health, why? And what can we do to make them stop? To start with by reading books like this one we become more aware of what is going on and how it affects us. I would have liked more practical information because I have heard that they are also injecting chickens and turkeys with MSG and spraying it on fruit and vegetables. Is that true and if so why? Also the list of ingredients which can contain MSG or most probably contain it is a bit vague because in the end one doesn't really know whether to avoid them or not. Food should be clearly labeled but I guess those profiting from these practices don't want that. Also it seems that they add it to medication, why? This book is written from the point of view of a neurosurgeon but maybe an update by an investigation journalist would be a good idea?

As far as people who eat a lot of MSG in their food being shorter and fatter I don't know whether that is true because as far as I know people are getting taller. And head injury being caused by MSG? I thought that you talked about head injury if you had banged your head against something for example? And I didn't understand how the drug L-DOPA, used to treat Parkinson's, has done much to extend the lifespan of young patients but there is evidence that it may speed up the progress of the disease? Regular exercise is necessary but not aerobics, why? The author advocates a low fat diet, especially low on saturated fats which I think is not a good advice. Even experts are now coming back on that one.

But the message is there and it is horrifying. What will be the future of this world where no one cares about the wellbeing of others? How can we protect ourselves and our children? I will try to pass the message to my daughters but what am I going to tell them? This, this and this is dangerous, avoid it, that, that and that might be dangerous, avoid it too.... How do you convince young women who lead busy lives to go around the supermarket reading all the labels? And how do you convince them to avoid the practical, almost ready products? Just think about Delia Smith, the guru of the kitchen who maybe unknowingly advertises so often the "cheat" products? Does she know? I don't think so. She doesn't strike me as someone who would harm others willingly? So may questions, so little answers but maybe if people are more aware of what is going on things will change! By the way, now I started reading all the labels I have already found out that known brands who advertise "no MSG added" add it under another name!
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In Response to USA reader and his trust in FDA, 5 Sept. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Excitotoxins (Paperback)
Dr. Blaylock is a neurosurgeon and is well versed in physiology. If you don't like what you read in this book, check out any website on aspartame and you will see its use is highly correlated to lupus, MS and other autoimmune diseases which used to be considered rare. And why in the world would any person with a brain trust the FDA? This is the organization that gave us thalidomide babies, addicted millions of people to valium, and approved Phen-Fen. Get your head out of the sand.
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Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills
Excitotoxins: The Taste That Kills by Russell L. Blaylock (Audio CD - 5 April 2013)
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