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3.0 out of 5 stars I'm sure it was more interesting than this..., 22 Jan 2001
By A Customer
I was hoping for a book like "Barbarian led by Bill Gates" with lots of information about the technical growth, infighting and genius which has inspired the rise of Sun. Instead I found this book lacked the depth I was after, with seemingly major developments covered in a paragraph. I also found the style a bit repetitive and irritating e.g. it felt like every time Eric Schmidt's name was mentioned you had to be reminded he would go on to be CEO of Novell.
I think there is probably a lot more to tell then has reached these pages. Shame.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Boring, uninspired, dull - avoid this book like the plague, 22 Feb 2001
By A Customer
As a keen reader of all books about the computer industry, I have read and enjoyed many. This most certainly isn't one of them. It is quite simply the dullest book in its genre that I have ever come across. Page after page of uninteresting facts about Sun written in a joyless, humourless, insipid way make for very dull reading indeed. There is no drama, no revelations, nothing. I regret buying it and only completed it because it was so expensive and hoped to get something out of it. If you have read the excellent Inside INtel by Tim Jackson and where hoping for more well written insights into the behemoths of the IT industry - think again. I heartily recommend not buying this book!
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2.0 out of 5 stars Tedious hagiography, 10 Aug 2004
Clearly written when times were better at Sun, this book provides very little insight into the man. Rather too much from his friends and barely a word from his enemies, this book provides a one-dimensional look at Scott McNealy. Yet McNealy is such good material for biography. A self-confessed libertarian with very little respect for authority (he even named his son Maverick) yet the man who has clinched a huge deal with the government of China, and who says tagging your children with GPS units is not Big Brother it's "just being Dad".
Takes you from Sun's founding to about 1999. Little before. Nothing since.
One for dedicated Sun-worshippers only.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Thin, 22 Oct 2007
If you were on a desert island from 1982 to 1999, this book might have extra value to you. Otherwise, you may already know a great deal about what's covered in this book.

"High Noon" is quite readable but doesn't dig very deep. It provides a good, albeit Pollyanna-ish introduction to Sun's history and to McNealy...up until 1999. Did I learn anything? Yes, for example, I hadn't known that Gosling architected NeWS. But the level of this book isn't that much deeper than a Reader's Digest article.

If you don't know much about Sun's pre-2000 past and want a quick survey, "High Noon" may help you.
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High Noon: The Inside Story of Scott McNealy and the Rise of Sun Microsystems
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