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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow!
I read these books first time years and years ago. I was coaxed into it by my mother and really enjoyed them.

They are pretty dark, alot of witchcraft and more death than i had been used to in my jackeline wilsons.

My favourite thing about all Jarvis books is that he does an illustration each chapter. There are not enough illustrations in books now...
Published on 15 Jun 2006 by Natalie Oughton

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1 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Are you mice or man-the miror squeaked,away I ran!
I was intrigued about a story about mice and the theme of the story.
One thing I enjoy very much is the ability to distinguish between different characters by using a 'voice' for those characters. Anyone who enjoys reading to their children may understand how important is to provide some separation of the characters while narrating so as not to confuse the child. You...
Published on 15 July 2003 by artizans


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow!, 15 Jun 2006
By 
Natalie Oughton "Natalie" (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I read these books first time years and years ago. I was coaxed into it by my mother and really enjoyed them.

They are pretty dark, alot of witchcraft and more death than i had been used to in my jackeline wilsons.

My favourite thing about all Jarvis books is that he does an illustration each chapter. There are not enough illustrations in books now and it's a shame. These are all wonderfully drawn and help you picture things that can other wise be quite hard to conjour in you mind. eg Mouse brasses.

I also love that Jarvis writes in trilogies and this series just keeps getting better and better. In this trilogy each of the books has a really different setting so the story seems to last alot longer. The third book in this trilogy (The Final Reconing) was one of the first books that made me cry, the second i think actually. I found it very very moving!

These books aren't particularly hard reads, you possibly won't steam through them like you did the da vinci code but you won't find it a struggle in the slightest.

A word of warning, read this book and you'll be a Jarvis addict like me!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic read!, 3 April 2001
By A Customer
This was the first Robin Jarvis novel I had the pleasure of reading - I picked it up from my school library when I was 14 and loved it to pieces. I'm 21 now and have read all of Robin's novels and have to say they are all brilliant. The Deptford Mice have always been my favourites though - the characters are great and you really feel like you know them by the end of the book. The story line to the Dark Portal is full of shocks and surprises and if you're anything like me you'll have difficulty in putting the novel down! If you enjoy excitment, fantasy and non-stop twists to your books, you'll love this!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing., 9 Feb 2003
By 
Edain "Edain" (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Many people are drawn to the fact that all of the characters in this trilogy are mice, bats or squirrels, and many are put off. Don't be. Suspend your belief and within the first page it's as normal as anything.
The mice in question are a small community who live in a house in Deptford. Arthur and Audrey have just come of age and are preparing for the ceremony in which they will be given their Mousebrass - a glass pendant bearing a symbol that will lay out their life, deciding their profession. Their celebrations are tinged with sadness - their father has gone missing. It is feared he travelled through The Grating at the end of the hall, a place where no mouse goes, for it is the lair of the rats.
The children know, deep down, the giving off the brass is only tradition. The Green Mouse doesn't really appear - it's a local in a leafy costume. And the brasses are made my the guy down the hall. However, Audrey emerges with a brass bearing the symbol of the cat. No one understands. No one's even seen the brass before. What is Audrey's fate?
Audrey's life is going to take a turn.
The first book takes Arthur and Audrey, visitor Piccadilly, who was the last to see their father alive, Twit the fieldmouse and Oswald, the sickly albino, through the sewers of Deptford, trying to find out what happened to Arthur Brown and just what is behind the rat's rebellion and resurfacing.
The beauty of these books is the way in which all six - three books, and then three prequels - tie in with one another. You'll read the three books and then the prequels explain minor details in the past. The mysterious Jupiter is fully explained in 'The Alchemist's Cat' (extremely terrifying!), the realm of the Starwife is explored in 'The Oaken Throne' (the only book ever to make me cry. Twice.) whereas Thomas Trition, an old seafarer who is of great help to Audrey and Arthur, has his mysterious past fully expanded upon in 'Thomas'. From the history of the bats and the squirrels, who play large parts in Audrey's tale, to the old ways and religions, long dead, long forbidden, the world of the mice is a huge one, expanded in simple detail. You won't get lost or confused. This is a world you'll stroll through, carefully instructed. There are new Gods, new religions, new fascinating histories for each race, there are cultures, there are new ways of life to explore.
Audrey is a fascinating girl. She is often very reluctant. She never wanted the brass in the first place. She doesn't want to fight the Rats, can't stand the cheeky Piccadilly, hates the burdens placed upon her. And yet she accepts her fate with a calm reluctance. She doesn't stamp and whine and throw tantrums. Her reluctance is subtle, something only the reader may notice between the lines. She is realistic. She wants the evil and the threats defeated... but does she have to be the one to do it? Yes. So she will. A wonderful and strong character, determined to fight, but with a softer, scared side we can all identify with.
Just try the first book ^_^ You'll be hooked.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyed reading this book over and over...., 29 April 2008
This is the first in the Deptford mice trilogy, and in my opinion way better and more original than Harry potter!

Audrey and Arthur are brother and sister mice, living happily until.... they are drawn through the ominous "Grate" to search for their missing father deep in the sewer, realm of the evil Jupiter. He is Lord and living god of the most evil rats in fiction! But the mystery is, what exactly is Jupiter really?

They make some great friends on their journey and meet scary enemies who like nothing better than peeling mice and frying their ears!! Will they rescue their lost dad? Packed with terror, sorcery and bravery, this is ideal for boys and girls from 8 and up. Contains excellent illustrations by the author too. The writing is of an excellent standard, and you really feel for the characters. Some you will love and cheer on, and others you will want to meet the nastiest ends!! (and some do....yuk)

Read the whole trilogy and try Robin Jarvis' other series too: Whitby Witches, Deptford Histories and Deathscent.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very nice read, 2 April 2006
I started reading this book in order to forget about school work for a while, and found that I couldn't put it down before I had finished reading it! Full of emotion, with a gripping atmosphere that ranges from peaceful and mellow to dark and dangerous, this story is an adventure that had me both smiling and crying before I was finished with it. An excellent escape from reality, with skillfully built characters who the reader easily identifies with.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You'll be gripped from start to finish, 23 Nov 2000
By A Customer
An excellent read and I recommend it for anyone 12+. Jarvis really gives you a feeling of tension as you read it and has you gripped from start to finish. I like Harry Potter but this is much better stuff. Buy it now! Also make sure that afterwards you read The Crystal Prison and The Final Reckoning and if you want, the Deptford histories trilogy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great for all ages, well maybe not too young...., 23 Aug 2013
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Was recommended this book a couple of friends with similar tastes in authors (king, gaiman, prattchet to name a few) as one of those books that is aimed at YA but can be enjoyed by adults too & is also pretty dark for younger audience. Lived up to hype, good read and despite featuring mice is pretty dark tale of the sewers and an evil god that reigns there. Could only be told with mice, a nice read on the kindle from a good British author. I look forward to more.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly good, 10 Jan 2007
By 
Mr. D. J. Read (Alnwick, Northumberland United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
I didn't really expect an awful lot from this novel, it struck me as a bit too much like Brian Jacques, and therefore poor. But it exceeded all expectation. This is because it is far more concise and infinitely more gripping.

I found myself quite absorbed, maybe because it was so easy to read, maybe because the plot was interesting. It was actually slightly frightening, dare I say, even for an adult, with the peeling of the mice and all. It even has a cunning twist at the end which takes you completely by surprise and a nice band of villains to get your teeth into.

There were a few things that didn't realy 'sit right' with me. The whole premise of rodents using magic didn't really work, and the characterisation of the protagonists not the best.

Reccomended for all ages, and superior to others in this field and genre. I am quite eager to crack on with the rest of the trilogy, and at these very reasonable prices I shall be adding them to my next order.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars absolutely brilliant, 23 Dec 2000
By A Customer
This was the one of the best books I have ever read. It is very gripping and is not boring for a moment. I love the Deptford Mice and Deptford Histories trillogy. They are fantastic and the only books to have me near to tears.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Thrilling story of two dreadful enemies, 5 Feb 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Dark Portal (Paperback)
This book is by far the best book I have ever read. The story between the good mice and evil rats is brilliant. It looks as though it would be a childrens book, but there are some parts which would upset some children. Otherwise, I would recommend this book to anyone who loves adventure, mystery, and cute little mice.
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The Dark Portal (Deptford Mice Trilogy)
The Dark Portal (Deptford Mice Trilogy) by Robin Jarvis (Audio CD - Mar 2013)
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