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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book for all lovers of wine
The witty title of this book gives expectations that are not disappointed. When you have one of Britain's leading philosophers, who is also fluent and witty, writing about his love of wine then the book is one for all lovers of wine. It is not a handbook - so there is not too much about vintages and certainly it is not a catalogue. Scruton tells something of his own...
Published on 7 April 2010 by Mr. G. Hester

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38 of 40 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The best of this book comes at the bottom of the glass
In this book Scruton seeks to combine his interest in philosophy with his love of wine. He laments the passing of the Greek "symposiums" where wine was drunk and important issues discussed. The book is certainly interesting, but it is not the jolly, "good humoured antidote to the pretentious clap-trap" that the publishers promise. At least not until the appendix where he...
Published on 25 Nov 2009 by Ripple


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38 of 40 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The best of this book comes at the bottom of the glass, 25 Nov 2009
By 
Ripple (uk) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
In this book Scruton seeks to combine his interest in philosophy with his love of wine. He laments the passing of the Greek "symposiums" where wine was drunk and important issues discussed. The book is certainly interesting, but it is not the jolly, "good humoured antidote to the pretentious clap-trap" that the publishers promise. At least not until the appendix where he suggests what to drink while reading major philosophers' works which is very funny and well written.

He begins by recognising two people influential in his own discovery of wine, which read a little like appreciative retirement speeches. He then moves on to discussing in detail French wines and then more briefly other wine regions. Here Scruton's knowledge and enthusiasm are evident, but he is something of a wine `buff' and there is plenty of wine-speak in evidence. Thus he suggests that `the best accompaniment to a bottle of fine old white Hermitage is a clay-baked hedgehog' and if you `roll the name Maillol in your mouth while imagining well-shaped buttocks and well-matured wine, and you won't be far from the taste of Collioure'. Not much of the promise of `an antidote to clap-trap' evident here, then. Overall, this half of the book is hard going.

In the second half, things get more interesting as he turns to philosophy and the role of wine and the implications of certain ideas to wine. Scruton is one of those writers who lets much of their character and opinion infuse his writing. He is unashamedly right wing, pro-France, anti-EU and largely un-`PC', and at times his views may cause mild offence to the more sensitive reader (the anti-fox hunting and modern Islamic views on alcohol both get particularly short shrift), albeit with some nice dry humour in parts (he suggests that the rich contribute to the well-being of the world by consuming the most expensive wines and converting it by natural processes to something that will benefit the soil). As you would expect, his knowledge and insights in philosophy are frequently interesting - although a good grounding philosophers will certainly help as this isn't a beginner's book on philosophy.

But the greatest joy of this book is the appendix where he suggests what wines to drink with different philosophers' works. It is irreverent and funny, but at the same time, wise. This, finally, fulfills the promise of the publisher's jacket notes. I would unreservedly award this chapter a five star rating.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A book for all lovers of wine, 7 April 2010
By 
Mr. G. Hester "Bibliophile" (Lancashire, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The witty title of this book gives expectations that are not disappointed. When you have one of Britain's leading philosophers, who is also fluent and witty, writing about his love of wine then the book is one for all lovers of wine. It is not a handbook - so there is not too much about vintages and certainly it is not a catalogue. Scruton tells something of his own encounters with various wines, at Peterhouse, Cambridge, that home of the egregious don, and in different parts of the world. So some interesting people are also mentioned. But the focus is always on the wine and its delights. He gives useful dicta such as "Never drink any fluid that has been kept in plastic." In an amusing final section, Scruton makes suggestions about which wines to drink while reading various philosophers. I have picked up much fascinating knowledge about wine, the sort of things that the ordinary wine book do not mention. I have a reasonable library of books on wine and on philosphy and this book has pride of place in both. Already, have I boughto a second copy since the first one I gave away to another wine-lover as a present.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not a bad idea, 24 Jun 2010
I thought this might be rather silly but actually it is quite engaging and a good read. Lots of different ideas and bits of history that are fascinating and its true the stuff about what to drink is spot on. I give it three glasses (large ones).
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1.0 out of 5 stars The worst book I have ever read, 9 Sep 2013
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This review is from: I Drink Therefore I Am: A Philosopher's Guide to Wine (Paperback)
I now retract the one star given. This book deserves no stars, but that is not possible in the review system.

This is the worst book I have ever read, and that includes the ones I was forced to read at school.

The author is a pompous know-it-all. This book is more about religion and music than wine. He continually tells us how clever he was to get hold of some fantastic top-growth wines at minimal cost. And how 'you, the reader' can't afford to buy them now.

At one point he states that Richard Dawkins 'prattles out nonsense' (page 109). At another he says that TE Lawrence 'failed to recognize that the people and culture no longer had much in common'.

What rubbish he speaks.

And then; 'It is our duty ... to help our Muslim neighbours to step back into their culture, to understand that there are ways of reading the Koran that adjust its commandments to the changing world of social interaction.' No, Roger, it is not our job.

Also that all supermarkets that sell wine with screw tops should be boycotted, that litter is always beer cans and soft drink bottles, never wine bottles so wine drinkers are more socially refined. - Get a life.

He seems to be able to imply that all the world's problems could be solved by alcohol. He should have been a Miss World contestant - not only would he wish for world peace he could solve it - would have gone down well with the judges.

Somebody gave this book 5 stars, along with 5 stars to two other books by the same author - the only reviews he has posted. How strange.

This book, he freely admits is a combination of previously published articles, so second-hand writing that is disjointed and tedious. This book is not 'witty', nor 'good humoured'. Its a wingeing, boring load of twaddle.

Before buying this book please contact me, you can gladly have mine, I don't want it. It is a shame that I cannot return it for a refund from Amazon but I made the mistake of reading it.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wisdom through drinking - that can't be bad, 28 Mar 2011
This review is from: I Drink Therefore I Am: A Philosopher's Guide to Wine (Paperback)
I already have read some of Roger Scruton books and found them challenging and interesting. I wanted to buy his book on Beauty (having watched his television program on Beauty). This book "I drink therefore I am" was offered along with it at a slightly reduced price - so I bought it too. Somehow i started to read "I drink Therefore I am" first and having started I couln't put it down. It talks about great wines (I agree with his idea that it is the soil and less so the grape that is important), however it is the thoughts and revelations that come out of the wine - too many to talk about here. However two related moments in the book illustrate the depth of understanding about the human condition that is in this book. First I am thinking of the bottle of Ksara in Beirut. The Nuns of the convent of Mother Theresa lighting the light of human souls whatever the human is like and to thing of life as a gift(page 73). The second is his trenchant criticism of Rawls and Nussbaum for encouraging "entitlement" and removing agape. I cannot recommend this book enough - five stars!
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The pleasures of wine, 12 July 2010
By 
P. L. D. Taylor "Patrick Taylor" (Somerset, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Roger Scruton's book 'I drink therefore I am, a philosopher's guide to wine' is one of the most unusual, and gripping, books on wine ever written. Apart from being devoted to Wine Roger Scruton is also a Philosophy Don. Philosophy, sometimes amusingly, creeps in among the Bottles. He regards wine as a most admirable accompaniment to food but he thinks it is even better with philosophy. Anyone who loves wine will find this book both delightful and enriching. It may also cause philosophers to turn to drink.
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I Drink Therefore I Am: A Philosopher's Guide to Wine
I Drink Therefore I Am: A Philosopher's Guide to Wine by Roger Scruton (Paperback - 6 Feb 2011)
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