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4.0 out of 5 stars Good for study
Easy reading. Good to understand some needs that we must respect when walking in Christ path. Direct and truthful. Worth buying.
Published 2 months ago by Jeannette

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars To Live is Christ
My full review can be found here: [...]
[...] [.] wordpress [.] com/2013/08/04/review-of-matt-chandlers-to-live-is-christ-to-die-is-gain/

Chandler writes this book "to invite readers into authentic Christian maturity." In his book, Chandler looks at some of the themes Paul writes about in Philippians, a book to help grow one to maturity, being unified,...
Published 6 months ago by S. Robinson


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4.0 out of 5 stars Good for study, 3 May 2014
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Easy reading. Good to understand some needs that we must respect when walking in Christ path. Direct and truthful. Worth buying.
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4.0 out of 5 stars To live is Christ; to die is gain, 22 Jan 2014
By 
Christopher Edwards (Crowborough, East Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: To Live is Christ to Die is Gain (Hardcover)
His cancer is only mentioned once in the book (and then only in passing). But it certainly lends this book credibility to know that a few years ago its author suddenly had to face the news of a malignant brain tumour. That experience, and the medical treatment which followed, must surely have honed Matt Chandler's thoughts on life, death and eternity.

The book's title, of course, comes from a famous verse in Philippians. And its theme, in a nutshell, is that Christians are made for maturity; and that maturity comes from having a gospel-centred perspective on life.

Matt Chandler doesn't so much expound Philippians as explore some of its key threads: joy, humility, passion, perseverance, contentment, etc. He starts in Acts 16 with the founding of the Philippian church, and wonders how the three converts mentioned there (the wealthy Lydia, the demon-possessed slave girl, and the 'blue-collar' jailer) are doing 10-15 years later when Paul writes to them. That's an interesting perspective.

Overall the style is informal to the point of being slangy at times...and sometimes (for me) to the point of being irritating! The authors are listed on the cover as 'Matt Chandler with Jared C Wilson'; the book doesn't give any clues as to what their respective roles were, and it may be that a certain amount of Chandler's spoken material has been adapted for the book.

The book could, for me, profitably have been fifty pages shorter by being written in a less chatty way and being tightened up a little more. Nevertheless, it presents a solid and challenging picture of what it might mean for us to say, as Paul did, "To live is Christ and to die is gain".
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good insights, 11 Jan 2014
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Well worth a read as th book dwells on the practical beginnings of the ministry in Philippi and teams them up with Paul's intimate and caring attitude towards the church there ... very good
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars To Live is Christ, 31 Dec 2013
By 
S. Robinson - See all my reviews
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This review is from: To Live is Christ to Die is Gain (Hardcover)
My full review can be found here: [...]
[...] [.] wordpress [.] com/2013/08/04/review-of-matt-chandlers-to-live-is-christ-to-die-is-gain/

Chandler writes this book "to invite readers into authentic Christian maturity." In his book, Chandler looks at some of the themes Paul writes about in Philippians, a book to help grow one to maturity, being unified, learning and walking in humility, persevering, and being content in Christ in all circumstances. "

Our lives should be lived to Him, through Him, for Him, with Him, about Him--everything should be about Jesus."

***The Chocolate Milk:
+ Chapter 4 (What the Humble Seek) is about being humble and howing humility to a world that wants to show off. We don't want to be like Paul and boast in our weaknesses; the world points them out to us enough. But Chandler (pg. 42) asks the pointed question: Why do we follow God? Do we follow Him because we're hoping for a nice mansion on earth, or do we follow Him for who He is and what He's done despite what the world does to us?
 The life of humility is based on the cross of Christ.

+Chapter 5(The Passionate Pursuit) was about yearning for a relationship with Christ over trying to be good for Him. Chandler in no way discredits trying to live a righteous life. What he tries to do away with is living to be a better person over knowing God. It's not being a better man/woman that leads to abundant life (Jn. 10:10).

It's knowing God through Jesus Christ. "It's the difference between obeying to be accepted and obeying because we are accepted" (pg. 78).
 We strive for that perfection, to get stronger in our weaknesses (prayer, studying, evangelism, serving, etc), though God will use us despite our weaknesses.


+ Chandler's book is theologically sound. His points and arguments come from scripture, his examples are interesting and to the point. He doesn't go to any extreme weird views (that I know of).

***The Spoiled Milk:

- There are a few times where Chandler takes a passage or a scenario from the ancient Roman world and would convert it to our modern day culture. The problem is that he wouldn't build the cultural-bridge to make it hit home.
+


I'll give 2 examples:

1. In chapter 1, after talking about the 'blue-collar' jailer, Chandler says the guy probably just wanted to go home, "have a beer, and watch a game."

Well, Romans didn't just "have a beer, and watch a game." Instead of telling the reader what a normal Roman citizen would do, unlocking the door to relate it to our culture, Chandler jumps the fence and brings it straight over to how we would think.
I know what he's getting at, but I couldn't help but think, "But a Roman wouldn't do that. What would he really want to do?
+

2. In Chapter 5, Chandler says the dogs from Philippians 3 are those who say, "I'm not as bad as I was when I was in college. I'm not as bad as I was when I first got married. I'm not as bad as you" (pg. 53). They want to think and say those things for their superior spiritual/moral goodness.

Again, it would have been more help if Chandler would have said who the dogs were and then apply it to the reader's life. Instead, he introduces the dogs and jumps straight to applying it to the reader's life. He shows the kind of people the dogs are, but now I have to figure out who they actually are myself.
+

- He's not quite as interesting a writer as he is a speaker. That's not to say he's never funny, just not as often as I thought he would be.

These are small examples, and I'm glad there are no major examples. I really didn't find much of anything in this book that I had any big problems with.

***Recommended?
Yes. I'm not an avid reader of preacher's application books like this and Judah Smith's Jesus is ____? , but this one was pretty good. While not as engaging as Judah Smith as a writer, Chandler's book is more mature and has more depth to it.

[P.S. Thanks to Netgalley.com and David C. Cook for allowing me a free copy to read and review! The words expressed above are my own opinions of the book. Page numbers are from the Adobe Digital Editions version.]
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To Live is Christ to Die is Gain
To Live is Christ to Die is Gain by Matt Chandler (Hardcover - 9 Jan 2013)
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