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5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful., 6 Nov 2013
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This review is from: Uzumaki: v. 2 (Paperback)
Simply put, a beautiful story.
For horror lovers of course.

More strangeness ensues, people turn into snails, and spirals take over.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A tale of short stories.., 22 Oct 2013
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This review is from: Uzumaki: Volume 2 (Paperback)
I really enjoyed the first book, found it completely original and awesomely creepy! So it was without hesitation the I ordered this the second in the series and of course the third book too.
However, I was a little let down. In this book I was hoping to find out a little more about the whole "Spiral" phenomenon and the likes, but we are just treated to another four or so short horror stories with no real connection to each other or explanation of the events. I found it irritating how with the turn of a page the characters seemed to just completely forget any of these events even happened, events which would put any normal individual in a mental institution.
With that said, if you enjoyed the first book, you will enjoy this one too. But it's basically just more of the same.
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5.0 out of 5 stars CAPTIVATING!, 13 July 2013
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This review is from: Uzumaki: Volume 2 (Paperback)
Vivid and realistic in the typical Japanese comic style realism! Dirturbing as well! Thank goodness its drawings! It would be stuff of nightmares if there pictures were real! Haha!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing Japanese Horror, 20 Feb 2013
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This review is from: Uzumaki: Volume 2 (Paperback)
The manga itself is stunningly beautiful and creepy. If you're a fan of Japanese horror this is a must buy. I had discovered the manga online first and decided I really wanted the comics on my bookshelf.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Genuinely disturbing!, 19 Aug 2008
By 
Mrs. Sharon L. Lawson "Sadakohere" (London, England, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Uzumaki: Volume 2 (Paperback)
If only the Uzumaki film included the sequences in this volume, what an amazing film that would be! May not get past the censors mind you!
Pretty disturbing and awful storyline events that carry on from Uzumaki vol 1 make this an unforgettable read. I had to buy the 3rd volume for the finale. Addictive as the story is so unique so I was quite saddened when I finished reading them.
Highly recommended for anyone of any age (over 16!) who enjoy surreal, unusual stories.
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12 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Upon an Ocean of Looming Shapes, 19 Dec 2002
By 
TorridlyBoredShopper "T(to the)B(to the)S" ("Daddy Dagon's Daycare" - Proud Sponsor of the Little Tendril Baseball Team, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Uzumaki: v. 2 (Paperback)
In my opinion, Uzumaki has to be one of the most disturbing visual remedies I've used to quench the utter state of boredom I sometimes find myself immersed within. Its ocular metaphors, coupling the ingenuity of Junji Ito's mind with believably sculpted pictorials depicting horror after sometimes nameless horror, are something unique in the field of terror.
The concept (taken from the back of the book because of its wonderful description):
Kurozu-cho, a small fogbound town on the coast of Japan, is cursed. But the spirit which haunts it does not have a name or a body, only a shape: uzumaki, the spiral, the hypnotic shape of the world. It possessed the father of teenage Kirie's withdrawn boyfriend, causing him to remake himself in its image before he died. It grows in ferns, in seashells, in curls of hair, in the crooked folds of the human brain.... As more people are caught in the pattern, over the town of Kurozu-cho hangs the spiral of cremated corpses; because even in death, there is no escape.
In this installment:
In Chapter 7 through 12, more issues are fleshed out, leading us away from the strange occurances at Dragonfly Pond and our two mainstay characters, using them somewhat but still dancing in other venues of thought. Briefly, these are:
In Chapter 7, Jack-in-the-box, Kirie catches the eye of a seventh-grader named Mitsuru Yamaguchi, a boy they simply call Jack-in-the-box because of his habit of surprising people by springing out at them from anywhere he can conceal himself. He decides that he must have her because it will surprise people to see him with such an intoxicating vision, constantly dogging her every step as he tries to obtain her. This, of course, leads to an ill-fated accident that Kirie blames herself for, one that invites the horror of the spiral into a cryptically grave-unveiling manner. It also shows us the impact the recent events have been having on the town, with the introduction of burial once again taking place, something that people have deemed necessary after the black-spiral clouds that come from cremating a resident of the town anywhere, not just in the town itself.
In Chapter 8, The Snail, (one of my favorites in the series thusfar) it begins to rain, a signal that the slowest boy in class, Katayama, will be coming to school. In fact, it is the only time he comes to school, and he even does this in the most tardy of fashions. Because of the speed he operates at, he is constantly taunted by one of his peers, Tsumura, who actually strips him down after gym class one day and drags him out in the hall. That's when they notice it, the spiracle impression looming upon his back, one that grows and grows as the days progress. Soon its apparent that there is a change transpiring in Katayama, one that causes him to slink across the ground and elevates the impression upon his back. In this, he isn't alone, either.
In Chapter Nine, The Black Lighthouse, an abandoned old lighthouse begins emitting a strangely spiraled ray from within, one that begins to effect people within the town in many a strange fashion. This alarms many of the town's residents, and they demand a party be sent to check it out. There requests are heard and people are sent, and their fate remains a secret until Kirie's younger brother decides that he and his friends should explore this decrepit monument.
In Chapter Ten, Mosquitoes, the mosquitoes begin to fly drowsy circles that put people to sleep, feeding on blood irregularly, large amounts of it in fact, to the mystery of the doctors within the town. While this is going on, herds of pregnant women are being attacked and admitted into the hospital, plus the killing are elevating at even the hospital itself. Victims with holes bored into them are found within their beds, leading to a question of "what the" thast is answered in a most gruesome manner.
In Chapter Eleven, the umbilical Cord, the pregnant women deliver the most adorable, most behaved, babies ever seen. This, of course, can't be good, nor can't it be dwelt on by me for fear of giving something away.
And, lastly, in Chapter Twelve, The Storm, A hurricane comes aground, stopping over the town and simply hovering. It seems to want something, too, because in the night it can be heard calling out a name, one very familiar to the readers.
All in all, I would say that this is wonderful installment, wetting the appetite for the final portion of the storyline. It does a lot to build on the first Uzumaki book, keeping the proverbial ball rolling without making it a boring spectacle. It isn't for the weak of heart of mind, however, and would only be recommended as bedtime reading to your children after you initially dose them with heaping helpings of horror movies and storylines to harden their soft pallets. O, and its in black and white, for those that think color is the only venue producing meritable works.
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Uzumaki: Volume 2
Uzumaki: Volume 2 by Junji Ito (Paperback - 18 Dec 2007)
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