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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A prime example of forward momentum.
One of the best things about Bujold's work is that the characters are as realistic as the plots are insane. BROTHERS IN ARMS is case in point. This book is really about the characters: Miles Vorkosigan, the hero of the series; his alter ego, Admiral Naismith; and Mark, a character introduced in this book. Miles is faced for the first time with some hard questions of...
Published on 8 April 1997

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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sci Fi Candy
Another bit of fluff, though much better than "Ethan of Athos". As far as science fiction authors go, McMaster Bujold is one of the better ones at characterization. She usually brings her characters to life for the readers. This book however, suffered from undercharacterization for most of the characters and made me unable to transfer to the world she had...
Published on 28 May 1999


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A prime example of forward momentum., 8 April 1997
By A Customer
One of the best things about Bujold's work is that the characters are as realistic as the plots are insane. BROTHERS IN ARMS is case in point. This book is really about the characters: Miles Vorkosigan, the hero of the series; his alter ego, Admiral Naismith; and Mark, a character introduced in this book. Miles is faced for the first time with some hard questions of identity, questions that don't really get resolved until MEMORY, the most recent book in the series. This book is also about family; Miles and Ivan, Miles and Mark, and Duv Galeni and Ser Galen all have to come to terms with what it means to be related to each other, what it means to be a family. All these characters resonate with emotional truth and are, at times, almost painfully realistic. These characters have souls.

The characters also have problems, and it is their problems which drive the plot. Well, in the beginning, anyway. The plot soon takes on a life of its own. The plot of this book, like its main character, gets by on forward momentum. It rushes, breathless and headlong, from the start to the finish, developing the most incredible twists in its path along the way. The pace is frenetic; the story never stops to rest. It carries you along, helpless, in its wake, and it is one wild ride. I read this novel cover to cover for the fun of finding out what could possibly happen next and for the enjoyment of Bujold's subtle (and not-so-subtle!) humor.

BROTHERS IN ARMS works on several levels. It is both a fun piece of escapism and a work of deep insight, as is all of Bujold's writing. I highly recommend it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fun, fascinating, and funny, 15 Oct 2010
By 
M. Hepworth (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Brothers in Arms (Miles Vorkosigan Adventures) (Mass Market Paperback)
Brothers in Arms is midway through the Miles Naismith/Vorkosigan series (start with "The Warrior's Apprentice"), and marks the point at which the young and callow Miles starts having to grow up and face things. The plot is frankly brilliant, and forces Miles to start making tough choices, while amusing the reader greatly.

The SF setting is far future, with spaceships, wormholes, and a network of human planets in conflict with each other. Miles Vorkosigan is from Barrayar, a planet that spent centuries isolated and developing a militaristic culture, but eagerly embraced new technology when it was redisovered. Miles is a hyperactive crippled overachiever, who on Barrayar is denigrated as a mutant and seen as a political liability for his influential father. In earlier books, he fled Barrayar and in an improbable series of events ended up masquerading as "Admiral Naismith", acquiring a powerful mercenary fleet in the process. Miles tries to balance his two lives, and this conflict drives much of the series.

In Brothers in Arms, Miles and his Fleet arrive at Earth to refit, and Miles has to take up his Barrayar identity again. He quickly finds it difficult to juggle two secret identities, especially when he's not sure which one he wants to be. The plot sees him confronted with consequences from his own heritage, and from his chosen dual life, and forces him to start thinking how, or if, to merge them.

Miles is a classic character: energetic, funny, and emotional. McMaster Bujold writes with a light touch, and there's plenty of humour to be had from the characters, although it's not a comedy by any stretch of the imagination. The plot moves with pace and verve, and the action-packed conclusion is thrilling. "Brothers in Arms" is excellent, but for the full effect you will want to have read the series from the start.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Are we seeing double; or is Miles split?, 29 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This is another volume in the Vorkosigan series, a space opera with plenty of action. It follows the events described in the short story "The Borders of Infinity" where there is an amzing escape from prison. Miles and his mercenary troop reach Earth for repairs, find that their payroll is missing, and discover a plot to replace him, apparently by a clone (but, Miles doesn't think that is possible: his fragile bone structure is not genetic disorder).
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great addition to the series, 17 Dec 1998
By A Customer
This is just a great book - plenty of action, plenty of humor. It's fun to see Miles and crew visit Earth.
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2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sci Fi Candy, 28 May 1999
By A Customer
Another bit of fluff, though much better than "Ethan of Athos". As far as science fiction authors go, McMaster Bujold is one of the better ones at characterization. She usually brings her characters to life for the readers. This book however, suffered from undercharacterization for most of the characters and made me unable to transfer to the world she had created. The nature of this genre is to suspend disbelief to a point, however, I found some of the situations tiresome reading because it just too far fetched. I will say that Miles is one of the most interesting series characters in the history of science fiction. Though this is one of the more billowy books in the series, overall, the series never disappoints.
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Brothers in Arms (Miles Vorkosigan Adventures)
Brothers in Arms (Miles Vorkosigan Adventures) by Lois McMaster Bujold (Mass Market Paperback - 29 Jan 2008)
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