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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Weber is back on form!
After the (frankly disappointing) 'War of Honor' and 'Crown of Slaves', I was a bit apprehensive about this latest entry in the HH series. The previous books had, in my view, concentrated far too much on machiavellian politics and it did it in a rather flat and uninspired manner. So when I picked up this 800+ page monster I was fervantly hoping for a...
Published on 24 Nov 2005 by Andrew Collings

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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Too long
This boook would have been very very good if it was 1/3 of the size
Published on 22 May 2009 by B. Valentine


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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Weber is back on form!, 24 Nov 2005
By 
Andrew Collings (North Yorkshire, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
After the (frankly disappointing) 'War of Honor' and 'Crown of Slaves', I was a bit apprehensive about this latest entry in the HH series. The previous books had, in my view, concentrated far too much on machiavellian politics and it did it in a rather flat and uninspired manner. So when I picked up this 800+ page monster I was fervantly hoping for a return to his previous form. I am glad to say that it is. Fans of 'Old School' Weber will relish a return to the epic space battles of his earlier books, and for those who liked the direction of the later books there is plenty of political manuevering, only this time around it reads much better. Mr Webers writing still seems to have matured significantly since Crown of Slaves, and this time around your sympathies lay as much with Haven as with Manticore. Be prepared though - he's killing off his characters in job lots! I counted the death of one Major character and at least 4 important secondary characters with several other known faces falling by the wayside. If I have a complaint, it's that Mr Weber still includes massive blocks of unecessary prose at times. Also, Honors list of titles is becoming faintly ridiculous, seemingly taking up half the book itself!
The surprise ending leaves the way open for at least one more book, and I wouldn't be surprised to see the series continuing for two or possibly three more installments. Good to see you back, David.
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tear-jerker of a roller coaster ride., 19 Dec 2005
I was one of the lucky ones who managed to nab an advanced copy of this book a few months before release here, which I then read cover to cover. In fact, my other half had to prise it out of my grubby paws to prevent me re-reading it there and then!
Weber has done it again. While ‘The Shadow of Saganami' was a book I found a little disappointing as the characterisations didn’t have the depths of his earlier works, ‘At All Costs’ has taken my breath away. I have to say, the opening chapters had me bawling my eyes out to the bemusement of those around me, ‘It’s only a book,’ they said, shaking their heads. I miss those that have gone in ‘At All Cost’ (no hints I’m afraid, read it!!), Weber was right to address that time marches on and waits for no man (or woman) and the harsh reality that the good die as easily as the bad in war. If you have been disappointed recently by his works in the Honorverse, pick this one up because you’ll either curse him for pulling all your heart strings or hug him for providing an engrossing read and a exceptional addition to the series.
Political intrigue and star battles lace this roller-coaster emotional ride as the Republic of Haven, Manticorans, Graysons and the newly created Torch go further head to head in a war that no one desires, yet unable to prevent. Poignant upheaval lies behind each chapter as Honor seeks to finally organize her life so that all her ties (emotional and political) compliment each other and consolidate her and those around her.
While fans have complained about the ever increasing political angles, it’s a little hard to avoid due to Honor’s eventual rise in rank and growth in all spheres. Everything today is touched by politics, whether we acknowledge it or not, and to steal Weber’s words; ‘…no captain in Her Majesty’s service can be a virgin where politics are concerned…’ Weber has always been more than just battles. His depth of humour, characterisation and deft twists in plot is what makes him a master of Space Opera.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I Wanted More and Boy Did I Get It!!!, 24 Nov 2005
I had been counting down the days for the next David Weber book, thinking that when it arrived and my misery lifted I would be reading a new installment in the Saganami Island series. Honor Harrington seemed destined to become a back plot character and the new generation would be taking over...
Far from it! The political shenanigans we had in War of Honor have come to fruition and the Star Kingdom of Manticore finds itself on the defensive in its war against Haven. The diplomacy and intrigue now take a rear seat, this is good honest space warfare with Weber at his best.
The Haven offensive has forced Manticore to adopt new tactics and who best to make the enemy suffer with an understrength fleet but our very own Honor Harrington. This book is an emotional rollercoaster and if you can stay on the ride till the end you will not be disappointed.
There are new weapons, new characters and we say goodbye to a few old friends... There is murder, mayhem and missiles... and the revealing of an enemy that could be 10 times worse than Haven ever was on its worst days.
And of course when I was finished I was back to square one and waiting in pain for the next book!!!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning!, 18 Nov 2005
By 
JA Fairhurst "johnfair" (Edgeley, Stockport) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
When I saw the original publicity for this on Baen's web site, I was the one stunned - 300,000 words! The books in David Weber's Harrington series have been gaining additional length as the series continues to tell the story of the greatest war in the explored quarter of the galaxy
With a timeline that continues straight on from 'War of Honor' and overlaps 'The Shadow of Saganami' those 300,000 words tell the story of Honor's war against the Republic of Haven. Like more recent books in the series, this book focuses on the politics of both star nations as they're caught up in a war neither side really want but neither side can stop as leaders and public alike find the costs unforgivably high on both sides.
This book shows an undoubtedly mature performance from Weber in his depiction of both sides' political leadership - no-one's particularly stupid or venal, nor is anyone magically able to beat the odds. Not even Honor who does pull off some superb attacks but also manages to get clobbered pretty badly herself.
Some people have expressed concern as to the increasingly larger proportion of the story that politics is taking up but given Honor's rank both in the military and society this is almost unavoidable and as I said above, Mr Weber's handling of this aspect has improved immeasurably. Of course, it wouldn't be Space Opera without space combat and you certainly get your money's worth with this book!
All-in-all, the eight hundred odd pages of the book just flew past with barely a chance to draw breath!
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34 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Weber Evil, 18 Aug 2005
By 
Detra Fitch (USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
The Star Kingdom of Manticore and the People's Republic of Haven are still in the bloodiest war ever known. In a previous novel, readers learned that the Havenites believed the Manties, during a cease-fire, altered documents. Therefore, the Havenites fired the first shot, ending the cease-fire without even bothering to notify the Manties. Now the Havenites have reason to believe that the Manties never altered anything. In fact, it appears that one of their own did the altering, hoping to cause the war to continue ... and succeeded.
Haven President Eloise Pritchart wants nothing more than for the war to end. She releases a POW, who happens to be close to Honor Harrington, with a message for Queen Elizabeth. Eloise wants to meet and discuss terms for peace. Elizabeth is given the choice of when and where. Eloise asks that Honor be included, as well as, the treecats.
Honor Harrington is still close to Hamish and Emily (of White Haven). As Honor begins her return to the front, she learns that she is pregnant. Though all know, in the back of their minds anyway, who the father is, no one dares state it aloud. Since being killed in battle is always a possibility, Honor has her unborn child removed from herself and placed in a tube to mature. (Totally safe.) Those on Manticore and Grayson, depending on how they feel about Honor, are either thrilled to learn about an heir or furious and wanting to use the child as a weapon against the mother.
***** First off let me state that I hope the author creates a whole new series about Torch, its teenaged queen, and its Amazonian people. Such potential exists there. Queen Berry Zilwicki came across much better than Queen Amidala could ever hope to have done.
Honor Harrington is something of "a personal bogeyman" for the Havenites. As always, Honor's reputation for unusual strategies grows, with great reason. If a student is only as good as his or her teacher, then the author, David Weber, is down right scary! The planning, tactical details, and battle executions are unnerving to me. I totally believe Weber to be a genius in this regard.
As my husband or I read ANY book by Weber, we lose a lot of sleep. We no longer bother to inform the other of WHY we look so tired and exhausted. We simply look into the eyes of the other and say, with a voice of pure disgust, " Weber Evil." Those two words say it all. This series has my highest possible recommendation! *****
Reviewed by Detra Fitch of Huntress Reviews.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning!, 11 Nov 2005
By A Customer
When I saw the original publicity for this on Baen's web site, I was the one stunned - 300,000 words! The books in David Weber's Harrington series have been gaining additional length as the series continues to tell the story of the greatest war in the explored quarter of the galaxy
With a timeline that continues straight on from 'War of Honor' and overlaps 'The Shadow of Saganami' those 300,000 words tell the story of Honor's war against the Republic of Haven. Like more recent books in the series, this book focuses on the politics of both star nations as they're caught up in a war neither side really want but neither side can stop as leaders and public alike find the costs unforgivably high on both sides.
This book shows an undoubtedly mature performance from Weber in his depiction of both sides' political leadership - no-one's particularly stupid or venal, nor is anyone magically able to beat the odds. Not even Honor who does pull off some superb attacks but also manages to get clobbered pretty badly herself.
Some people have expressed concern as to the increasingly larger proportion of the story that politics is taking up but given Honor's rank both in the military and society this is almost unavoidable and as I said above, Mr Weber's handling of this aspect has improved immeasurably. Of course, it wouldn't be Space Opera without some space combat and you certainly get your money's worth with this book!
All-in-all, the eight hundred odd pages of the book just flew past with barely a chance to draw breath!
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Haven/Manticore War resumes, 15 Dec 2012
This review is from: At All Costs (Honorverse) (Mass Market Paperback)
Having resumed the Haven/Manticore War in "War of Honor", Manticore is in a bad way. Although the incompetent & corrupt High Ridge government had been replaced with the far more heroic Lord Summervale, the build down of the fleet has had tragic effects on the ability of Manticore to fight. Despite only five years previously being on the verge of conquering the Havenite capital, Manticore finds itself on the defensive and has to adopt a raiding strategy to prevent the Havenites from mounting an assault on Manticore itself that they would have trouble repelling.

Fortunately, unlike the previous book, the rather simplistic politics is played dowm (it's pretty much "Summervale good, High Ridge bad"), but gets back to what most of the fans off the series probably want, which is space battles. But more than that, Mr Weber has actually considered the fact that Honor is something like the fifth ranking Admiral the Alliance has and so she's actually responsible for suggesting military policy and not just enacting it. Over the course of the book, we see strategies, counter strategies, counter strategies to the counter strategies until it all comes to a grand climax at the end with the most titanic clash that the Galaxy has seen (so far).

However, underlying all this is the dark machinations of the Mesan Alignment, who desperately want the two sides back fighting each other. Now that Manticore is expanding into the Talbot Sector, the Alignment is forced to come out of the shadows somewhat and are manipulating the Solarian League into declaring war on Manticore. Faced with a two front war against the two biggest navies in the Galaxy, Manticore must defeat Haven before it faces the even larger threat of the League. In a bid to prevent the Haven/Manticore War from escalating, we see the "Spook Duo" (Victor Cachat and Anton Zilwicki) meeting up with Honor before heading off to Mesa to get proof that they are the ones responsible for the war.

Oh, and in a plot twist that's spoiled by the cover picture, Honor gets pregnant (her contraceptive implant had expired while she was "dead") and marries Hamish Alexander. Perhaps surprisingly, his current wife, Emily, is fine with it (they get married on Grayson, where polygamy is legal).
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4.0 out of 5 stars Keeps the story going, 9 Sep 2011
This review is from: At All Costs (Honorverse) (Mass Market Paperback)
I have been a fan of the honor harrington series (and related stories) for a long time. This book continues the story in a logical fashion. I really enjoy the attempt to portray the complexity of societies and diplomacy with understandable motivations for the bad guys as well as the heroes, and the fact that good people keep shooting at each other as well.
A warning, if you have not read the earlier stories then a lot of this story will not make as much sense, but I would heartily recommend the series as a terrific example of growth of the iconic character (Honor) and escalation of the scale and complexity as she achieves higher levels of responsibility. The very complex multi-stellar and multi-societal universe that has been created is fascinating to explore and the characters are satisfyingly larger than life and interesting for a fan of space opera.
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5.0 out of 5 stars great stuff, but long winded at times, 30 Sep 2009
By 
P. barton (LONDON) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: At All Costs (Honorverse) (Mass Market Paperback)
this is a big book, a big book for a big story and in my mind one of the best space operas written, but i must say at times it does go on a bit, as in long winded, i mean pages and pages of politics and other almost pointless details, the climactic battle comes within the last few pages and is brilliant and leaves things open for another volume ???? who knows, still worth a read and if it is the conclusion then it is a fitting one at that
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5.0 out of 5 stars enjoyed the whole series so far,, 11 Mar 2009
By 
Jean Martin - See all my reviews
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This review is from: At All Costs (Honorverse) (Mass Market Paperback)
At All Costs (Honorverse) Been reading the whole series and although I find the war gamer information distracting these are good tales and have even sent me back to read and enjoy the Hornblower books by C S ForesterThe Young Hornblower Omnibus: Mr. Midshipman Hornblower, Lieutenant Hornblower, and, Hornblower and the HotspurCaptain Hornblower R.N.: "Hornblower and the 'Atropos'", "The Happy Return", "A Ship of the Line"
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At All Costs (Honorverse)
At All Costs (Honorverse) by David Weber (Mass Market Paperback - 25 Sep 2002)
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