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on 6 July 2015
Essential reading
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on 21 July 2014
interesting read
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 1 November 2014
Nothing to learn from this book.
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on 17 July 2014
superb
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7 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on 1 August 2007
Generally speaking I thought this book was like a breath of fresh air. It is a no holes barred book and cuts to the chase, and even in several incidents uses languages which some feminists would find insulting. Just the day before yesterday I was walking in a nearby town and I was passed by a young woman wearing shorts the length of knickers and literally showing half of her gluteals. I thought that this book asks some tough questions even of feminists. However, one question it did not ask was too what extent are women influenced by the media? This is one of the most insulting things in my opinion about feminism, and I expected Levy to answer it. The fact that we are all programmed and not capable of independent thought, bars any woman who dresses like this from criticism.

I like the fact that the author mentions the history of second wave feminism. The era between the 1960s and 1990s, and how some of todays notions of female empowerment contradict the ideals of second wave feminism. Even so called Third Wave feminists. Whilst, the author criticises women who wear shorts so short they could be knickers and low cut tops. She also criticises women who dress and act like men. My questions to her would be with which women does she have the most sympathy, and which type is most threatening to the male patriarchy and why. Why when there is far more encouragement from the press and media is there not more encouragement for women to dress in male like tracksuits and act like men in a boardroom? Is the media encouraging one in hope to get rid of the other and if so why? The author in my opinion did not answer this question.

Despite this I give the book a high rating. It starts to ask some of the questions some feminists and other people want asked. I like the way it compares feminism of the 1960s and 1970s to modern day culture. The situation in the school is quite enlightening. Especially the part which involves the teachers trying to implement some sort of restrictions on what children can wear to school is very enlightening. I also would like to have read more history about feminism throughout the world. The fact that this book in it's entirety concerns feminism in the U.S.A, and nowhere else in the world. Ignores the history of feminism in other countries.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 30 May 2013
This book, should be mandatory for both genders at a young age. After you read it, it's so easy to figure out what's happening around you, and why. Just looking at genders and the way they behave, finds its explanation in this book.
Recently I was taken for a homosexual by a lesbian couple, and it was quite funny to get into this topic. Levy has done some serious research, and crossed her data accurately. How we went from "don't treat me like a slave" to "please, do treat me like a sex slave" (because this is all i can promote myself as), is still beyond me though. Perhaps if we turned off the TV..
(and started reading books like this)
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2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 31 January 2015
I did really try with this book. It's not often that I do choose to put a book down, but I find the slut shaming and transphobia revolting.
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9 of 26 people found the following review helpful
on 18 December 2009
I am not sure this author did a whole lot of research when undertaking the task of writing this book. Issues were raised which needed to be explored but she did not go into any depth. I really did not learn much from this book.
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2 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on 22 February 2012
I remember when I was younger, the chief complaint by many feminist-minded women was that women were forced to wear less and less clothing by those darn perverted men. Yet, when I asked those women why it was that in the countries where women have the most freedom to behave how they want to, they wear the least clothing, while in the most conservative, male-dominated societies like in the Middle East or Victorian Britain, they cover up, there was always that hesitant silence which always follows when someone's neat preconcepions of the world have just been shattered, as this fact completely undermines all feminist ideology on the subject. Women are NOT forced to behave the way they do - it's part biologically programmed into all submissive genders, and partly the result of the extended adolescence of both genders - I often see women way past their prime dressing like teenagers, trying to look sexy but looking as ridiculous as an old man trying to show off his masculinity. The truth is that in societies where men dominate, the patriarchical ones like Victorian Britain or traditional Islamic societies, women have to cover up. The more freedom women have, the less clothes they wear, at least in civilized societies. Look at women-led organizations like PETA or Femen, for example. No man asked for volunteers to strip in public at a demonstration, those organizations are completely led by women - they only have themselves to blame if no-one takes them seriously anymore. Women have an innate tendency to exhibitionism, which is biologically programmed (or has evolved) in the gender of all species which take the submissive role in courtship. In 95% of all living species, the male takes the role in courtship, and is thus physically larger and more aggressive. In 5% of all species, the female takes the initiative in courtship, and in those species the female is bigger and more aggressive.

Thus, according to current evolutionary theory, the only way things are going to change on earth is when women take the initiative in courtship over a very long period of time. The social engineering I see people here praising is of dubious long-term value. It's like genetic modification, but for a society, not just an individual. Just as the plants we eat should evolve naturally, and suffer from possible side effects when genetically modified, so a society suffers from horrible side effects when we don't allow it to evolve naturally, and try to genetically modify it. Curiously, it is just those people who go nuts about the genetic modification of food who are most in favour of doing the same to our society. The rise of fascism was an inevitable counter reaction to that unnatural and drastic social engineering initially proposed by Marx, and led to the deaths of up to 100 million people. One wonders if all those deaths are considered to have been 'worth it' considering the 'rights' gained, especially as because these rights did not evolve naturally, the world is bound to revert to the stage to which it should naturally have evolved. It is high time that someone tackled this issue, and Ariel Levy is to be praised for at least shining a little more light on a subject which has only been more misunderstood by feminist ideology based on victimization which refuses to take any blame or responsibilty for one's actions - in other words, it is the effect of feminist ideology itself on women which has led to the so-called Raunch Culture.
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2 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on 13 July 2014
Oh look, a Jewish feminist. Surprise surprise. Good goy. Lop another foreskin off. Wimminz. Feelz. Oppression.

The ideology of hurdurherpderpism in a book.
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