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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The mutt's nuts, and no mistake
This is an utterly fantastic book, marked out by the author's ability to make his central creation more real than most actual people, and for making Cole's personality jump off the page at you so you develop an empathy for the situations he ends up in. Brilliantly self-depreciating (but not overly so) and excellently written this really gets plaudits for taking the...
Published on 15 May 2000

versus
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining thriller
I am reading the Elvis Cole books slightly out of order and each time I am reminded how good the series is.
Cole is a good hearted Private Eye supported by his lethal partner Joe Pike. The joy of these books is the blend of story, character and terrific one liners.
In this one Cole decides to hunt down a missing father, unaware that forgery, the Russian Mafia,...
Published on 6 Mar. 2010 by Nick Brett


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The mutt's nuts, and no mistake, 15 May 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Indigo Slam (Paperback)
This is an utterly fantastic book, marked out by the author's ability to make his central creation more real than most actual people, and for making Cole's personality jump off the page at you so you develop an empathy for the situations he ends up in. Brilliantly self-depreciating (but not overly so) and excellently written this really gets plaudits for taking the nonchalant cool of 40's and 50's detective thrillers and overlaying it with 90's attitudes and perspectives. It is also a brilliantly plotted book, with no aspect of the plot developments and surprises coming over as forced issues, making the book all the more readable. If the frantic and slightly awkward gunplay towards the end is a little at odds with the intelligent cool of the rest of the novel, maybe it doesn't matter all that much as by then you are so sucked into Cole's mindset that you would happily go anywhere the author takes you. Read this book now - I can't impose that upon you strongly enough.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Elvis, the Family Man!, 14 Jun. 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
If you have yet to begin the marvelous Elvis Cole series by Robert Crais, you've got a great treat ahead of you! Few series get off to a stronger start than Mr. Crais did with The Monkey's Raincoat, which won both the Anthony and Macavity awards for best novel while being nominated for the Edgar and Shamus awards as well. Stalking the Angel followed powerfully with classic noir style of the 1930s hard-boiled detective up against evil moderated with wise cracks. Lullaby Town updated the 1930s detective stories about Hollywood, and kept the same cynicism about Tinsel Town. Free Fall looked hard at the corruptibility of the police and found them wanting. Voodoo River added a love interest for Elvis to make him more vulnerable and appealing. Sunset Express showed us the crooked side of criminal defense work in a style like Chinatown. And the books just keep getting better from there in their characterizations, action, story-telling and excitement.
Elvis Cole is the star attraction, the co-owner of The Elvis Cole Detective Agency. He's now 40ish, ex-Army, served in Vietnam, ex-security guard, has two years of college, learned to be a detective by working under George Feider, a licensed P.I. for over 40 years, does martial arts as enthusiastically as most people do lunch, and is fearless but not foolish. He's out to right the wrongs of the world as much as he is to earn a living. Elvis has a thing for Disney characters (including a Pinocchio clock), kids, cats, scared clients and rapid fire repartee. He drives a Jamaica yellow 1966 Corvette Stingray convertible, and usually carries a Dan Wesson .38 Special.
His main foil is partner, Joe Pike, an ex-Marine, ex-cop who moves quietly and mysteriously wearing shades even in the dark . . . when he's not scaring the bad guys with the red arrows tattooed on his deltoids, which are usually bare in sleeveless shirts. Although he has an office with Elvis, Pike spends all of his time at his gun shop when not routing the bad guys with martial arts while carrying and often using enough firepower to stop a tank. Pike rarely speaks . . . and never smiles. A standing gag is trying to catch Pike with a little twitch of his lips indicating he might possibly be amused. But he's there when you need him. He drives a spotless red Jeep.
Robert Parker's Spenser is the obvious character parallel for Elvis, but Spenser and Elvis are different in some ways. Cole is more solitary, usually being alone when he's not working. Cole is very much L.A. and Spenser is ultra blue collar Boston. Cole is martial arts while Spenser boxes and jogs. What they have in common is that they're both out to do the right thing, with money being unimportant. They both love to crack wise as they take on the bad guys. The bad guys hate the "humor" in both cases, and can?t do much about it. The dialogue written for each is intensely rich.
Mr. Crais has a special talent for making you care about his characters, especially the clients and their kids. You'll want to know what happens to them. With a lot of experience in script writing, Mr. Crais also knows how to set the scene physically and make you feel it. He may be out finest fiction writer about physical movement. He gives you all the clues to picture what's going on . . . but draws back from giving so much detail that you can't use your own imagination to make things better.
On to Indigo Slam, the seventh book in the series. The title refers to using an unusual ploy to capture an important advantage.
The book opens with a moving prologue in which a father and his three children enter the Federal witness protection program in a terrifying way. Three years later, Teresa (Teri) Haines, 15, and her brother Charles, 12, and their sister Winona, 9, arrive at Elvis's office to hire him to find their father, a printer, who has been gone for eleven days. He does this every so often. Their mother is dead. Elvis isn't sure whether to turn them in to Children's Services or to forget the whole thing. He decides to follow them, as Teri drives off in a Saturn. He finds them in good shape, and decides to look for their father instead.
In a parallel thread, attorney Lucy Chenier, Elvis's love, arrives in Los Angeles to follow up on an opportunity to become a legal reporter for television station KROK. Elvis presses her into helping with the new clients. In the meantime, something goes wrong with her negotiations and Elvis has to detect what the problem is. The specter of her former husband's opposition to her moving to Los Angeles looms large over Lucy and Elvis by story's end.
The book is really a short story followed by three novellas that are connected by a common set of characters. The first novella focuses on finding Mr. Haines. The second novella looks into what he has been doing while he was away. The third novella is about solving the problems that face the family. In true Crais fashion, the final novella is filled with intense, violent action that will keep you turning pages as rapidly as you can read.
I especially love the local color from Southern California in this book. If you have ever been to Disneyland, you will find the sequence there to be a remarkably interesting and rewarding one from that perspective.
The book's theme is about what love is and how to express it while under fire. I thought that this was Mr. Crais's most tender and touching novel.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Joy, 3 July 2006
By 
Scully Bloke (Wiltshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
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I first came across Elvis Cole PI a few months back when I picked up a copy of the Monkees Raincoat. What an absolute joy is was to find a writter who brings his characters so much to life. This is the seventh Elvis Cole novel, and I am reading them in sequence (which is highly recommended) as some of the themes carry on from one book to another. Cole is such a great character, lonely, independant, funny, still searching for that important person in his life, and an absolutely faboulous PI.

Crais takes you through the simple logic of seeing the evidence, finding the clues in a very nicely written style. To the point but with a great deal of affection for the main character. And then there is Pike, Elvis Coles partner. Silent but deadly. A brilliant series of books.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining thriller, 6 Mar. 2010
By 
Nick Brett (Wiltshire, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
I am reading the Elvis Cole books slightly out of order and each time I am reminded how good the series is.
Cole is a good hearted Private Eye supported by his lethal partner Joe Pike. The joy of these books is the blend of story, character and terrific one liners.
In this one Cole decides to hunt down a missing father, unaware that forgery, the Russian Mafia, the Feds and even Vietnamese gun men are also heavily involved.
Perhaps the story is slightly weaker then usual with some slightly clichéd Mafia characters, but the other stronger characters and the dialogue do compensate. Fast moving if slightly short book (I read it in one sitting) this is a fun and entertaining read.
If you have not yet caught up with this series, you have a treat in store.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars top of the range, 6 July 2007
I have recently read ALL Robert Crais books in the right order, having had some time stuck in bed from an accident, and I have had a fantastic time, laughing and being enthralled by the magic Pike/Cole or Cole/Pike duet. What a set of characters. Tough guys with humour (at least Cole ;-), always enrolled by a nice girl's smile into new and terrific adventures. These are not just whodunits, they have atmosphere and an addictive cast of characters. You can pick any Robert Crais book at random, they are all good ... (ok maybe Sunset Express is the weakest but that is nitpicking).
This particular story - Indigo Slam - is about counterfeiters, the Ukrainian mob, a very tough young girl who wants to save her dad ... and a lot of cracks from Elvis Cole. Loads of fun, good time guaranteed. Read it !
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another Crais cracker!!, 7 Dec. 2000
Crais has hit the mark again with this craftily scripted story, which wil keep you reading long into the night.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Elvis, the Family Man!, 14 Jun. 2004
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 127,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)   
If you have yet to begin the marvelous Elvis Cole series by Robert Crais, you've got a great treat ahead of you! Few series get off to a stronger start than Mr. Crais did with The Monkey's Raincoat, which won both the Anthony and Macavity awards for best novel while being nominated for the Edgar and Shamus awards as well. Stalking the Angel followed powerfully with classic noir style of the 1930s hard-boiled detective up against evil moderated with wise cracks. Lullaby Town updated the 1930s detective stories about Hollywood, and kept the same cynicism about Tinsel Town. Free Fall looked hard at the corruptibility of the police and found them wanting. Voodoo River added a love interest for Elvis to make him more vulnerable and appealing. Sunset Express showed us the crooked side of criminal defense work in a style like Chinatown. And the books just keep getting better from there in their characterizations, action, story-telling and excitement.
Elvis Cole is the star attraction, the co-owner of The Elvis Cole Detective Agency. He's now 40ish, ex-Army, served in Vietnam, ex-security guard, has two years of college, learned to be a detective by working under George Feider, a licensed P.I. for over 40 years, does martial arts as enthusiastically as most people do lunch, and is fearless but not foolish. He's out to right the wrongs of the world as much as he is to earn a living. Elvis has a thing for Disney characters (including a Pinocchio clock), kids, cats, scared clients and rapid fire repartee. He drives a Jamaica yellow 1966 Corvette Stingray convertible, and usually carries a Dan Wesson .38 Special.
His main foil is partner, Joe Pike, an ex-Marine, ex-cop who moves quietly and mysteriously wearing shades even in the dark . . . when he's not scaring the bad guys with the red arrows tattooed on his deltoids, which are usually bare in sleeveless shirts. Although he has an office with Elvis, Pike spends all of his time at his gun shop when not routing the bad guys with martial arts while carrying and often using enough firepower to stop a tank. Pike rarely speaks . . . and never smiles. A standing gag is trying to catch Pike with a little twitch of his lips indicating he might possibly be amused. But he's there when you need him. He drives a spotless red Jeep.
Robert Parker's Spenser is the obvious character parallel for Elvis, but Spenser and Elvis are different in some ways. Cole is more solitary, usually being alone when he's not working. Cole is very much L.A. and Spenser is ultra blue collar Boston. Cole is martial arts while Spenser boxes and jogs. What they have in common is that they're both out to do the right thing, with money being unimportant. They both love to crack wise as they take on the bad guys. The bad guys hate the "humor" in both cases, and can?t do much about it. The dialogue written for each is intensely rich.
Mr. Crais has a special talent for making you care about his characters, especially the clients and their kids. You'll want to know what happens to them. With a lot of experience in script writing, Mr. Crais also knows how to set the scene physically and make you feel it. He may be out finest fiction writer about physical movement. He gives you all the clues to picture what's going on . . . but draws back from giving so much detail that you can't use your own imagination to make things better.
On to Indigo Slam, the seventh book in the series. The title refers to using an unusual ploy to capture an important advantage.
The book opens with a moving prologue in which a father and his three children enter the Federal witness protection program in a terrifying way. Three years later, Teresa (Teri) Haines, 15, and her brother Charles, 12, and their sister Winona, 9, arrive at Elvis's office to hire him to find their father, a printer, who has been gone for eleven days. He does this every so often. Their mother is dead. Elvis isn't sure whether to turn them in to Children's Services or to forget the whole thing. He decides to follow them, as Teri drives off in a Saturn. He finds them in good shape, and decides to look for their father instead.
In a parallel thread, attorney Lucy Chenier, Elvis's love, arrives in Los Angeles to follow up on an opportunity to become a legal reporter for television station KROK. Elvis presses her into helping with the new clients. In the meantime, something goes wrong with her negotiations and Elvis has to detect what the problem is. The specter of her former husband's opposition to her moving to Los Angeles looms large over Lucy and Elvis by story's end.
The book is really a short story followed by three novellas that are connected by a common set of characters. The first novella focuses on finding Mr. Haines. The second novella looks into what he has been doing while he was away. The third novella is about solving the problems that face the family. In true Crais fashion, the final novella is filled with intense, violent action that will keep you turning pages as rapidly as you can read.
I especially love the local color from Southern California in this book. If you have ever been to Disneyland, you will find the sequence there to be a remarkably interesting and rewarding one from that perspective.
The book's theme is about what love is and how to express it while under fire. I thought that this was Mr. Crais's most tender and touching novel.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great pace, action all the way through, good characters, 2 May 2001
By A Customer
My first read of a Crais novel and after two pages I couldn't put it down. My weekend vanished into the world of Elvis Cole, private detective in LA. Good storyline with informative descriptions and real characters. Ordering the other books in anticipation of more adventure.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Tracing a missing father proves costly for Elvis., 25 April 2001
By A Customer
Tracing missing persons is bread and butter to LA PI Elvis Cole.Though when Teri Hewitt asks Elvis to trace her missing father,he has one or two reservations. For one,Teri is only fifteen years old,and there's something about her dad's job description as a printer that just doesn't sit right. But Elvis is already hooked.A weakness for the fairer sex,and the insistence of his girlfriend to do the right thing,soon see Elvis in too deep to turn back. While Elvis begins to track Teri's father's movements,the Russian mafia are watching his.And then there are the US Federal Marshals who have one or two questions of their own for the elusive Mr Hewitt. Elvis needs some answers quickly,or his casebook may be closed for good.
As with most Elvis Cole novels,Indigo Slam is fairly compact at 294 pages,but Elvis's snappy repartee and Crais's superb locational descriptions ensure that you are not left feeling short changed.A diverse blend of characters and Crais's insider knowledge make the plot both taut and authentic.A very worthy addition to the Elvis Cole stable.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Elvis must not be allowed to leave the room, 15 April 2010
By 
Gs-trentham - See all my reviews
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The tradition of the externally tough, internally sentimental, wise-cracking Private Eye is alive and well in the inventive mind of Robert Crais. Where Chandler's Marlowe led the way, and Parker's Spenser followed, Elvis Cole fully upholds the style and the standard. Where Spenser has Hawk, Susan and Pearl the dog. Cole has Pike, Lucy and a battle-scarred cat.

In Indigo Slam they duck and dive among a rich supporting cast (some more believable than others) of federal marshals, Russian mobsters, Asian counterfeiters, assorted police and secret service personnel, plus a trio of children. Eight-year-old Charles, forever flipping the finger and f-ing 'm, will make you laugh, fifteen-year-old Teri will bring you close to tears.

The plot is intricate but cleverly constructed to accelerate the page turning; the surprises are frequent. If for me there was one final twist too many, I still closed the book and immediately placed my order for the next. I need to know if Elvis and Lucy really have solved the problem of Lucy's nasty ex-husband.
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Indigo Slam (Elvis Cole 07)
Indigo Slam (Elvis Cole 07) by Robert Crais (Paperback - 15 Mar. 2012)
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