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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We all are gettin' older every day...
... so it isn't some great wonder that this also happens to our hero Harry Bosch.

In the last book (The Drop (A Harry Bosch Novel), instead of choosing retirement Harry Bosch returned to the LAPD with a 5 year contract under the Deferred Retirement Option Plan - "The DROP". He now works with the Open Unsolved Unit trying to bundle up Cold Cases.

And...
Published on 11 Dec. 2012 by miki101.Michaela

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bosch not at his best
I always enjoy a Harry Bosch novel, but somehow the plot and characters felt a little tired. Maybe it is time Harry called it a day and spent more time with his daughter. It wasn't hard to guess the outcome (unlike in earlier books in this series) and the whole story felt tame after reading the latest John Sandford book.
Published 19 months ago by jean ennis


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We all are gettin' older every day..., 11 Dec. 2012
This review is from: The Black Box (Hardcover)
... so it isn't some great wonder that this also happens to our hero Harry Bosch.

In the last book (The Drop (A Harry Bosch Novel), instead of choosing retirement Harry Bosch returned to the LAPD with a 5 year contract under the Deferred Retirement Option Plan - "The DROP". He now works with the Open Unsolved Unit trying to bundle up Cold Cases.

And there it comes along ... May 1992 - The Snow White case.
So called because most of the other victims after May 1992, and after four LAPD officers were acquitted for the savage beating of Rodney King, were of colour. What was a very young and very white Danish reporter doing in the middle of the looting and beating that took place for weeks in certain quarters of Los Angeles.
Harry and his colleagues - working under wartime conditions and the supervision of ex-Gulf-War troopers - can only do that much on the crime scene.
Not enough to solve this apparently so futile murder. But there WAS someone to gain of the death of the free-lance reporter...

And now it has come his way - the Snow White. And Harry, the old bloodhound as always, begins to sniff in all possible places to find his The Black Box. He calls it that way because he knows: In every case there is a Black Box, like those who are nearly indestructible and give away - when found - their knowledge about airplane or ship disasters. He only needs to find his special Black Box to resolve the case.
And he will find it. And will try to hunt the culprit(s) down.
But he himself is a hunted, too.
He has lacked of respect for the (In)competence of his superiors at LAPD - especially his current Lieutenant O'Toole more or less friendly nicked "O'Fool" -who refers Bosch to Internal Affairs on what seems to be a petty cause. But it could become very important because it can affect the way Harry may run or not the investigation. And he could lose his job very easily if the complaint remains standing.
But in the very end also the Internal Affairs will be of very, but very very important use for our hero, who has centered a wasp's nest with his investigation.
And - as I said above - we are all gettin' older every day - and so's our Harry.
So also heroes need a helping hand, sometimes...

This book is a perfect read not only for friends and lovers of Michael Connelly and Harry Bosch, but for all those who like their Police Procedures with the very personal touch only an author of this bravura nowadays dares to use on his protagonists.
And that is an experience to value highly - in this times of easy e-books and wishy-washy investigations!
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41 of 44 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars More like the Connelly of old., 16 Jan. 2013
This review is from: The Black Box (Hardcover)
The Black Box is a nice return to form for Michael Connelly and although not as edgy or thrilling as earlier novels, its not far away.

Harry Bosch tries to solve the 20 year old murder of a Scandinavian Photo journalist who was killed during the LA riots. As Harry was the investigator on the case, he has never been able to let go of the fact that the Killer got away with it.

Although short on action (until the finale), the pacing of the mystery is done well and the facts that unfold from an obvious path of enquiry into a much bigger conspiracy are beautifully woven as only Michael Connelly can.

Some repetition lets the novel down slightly. The Internal affairs beef, the "can I trust my partner" exercise and Harry's inevitable clash with his superiors are now well trodden ground.
I also found the appearance of a certain character at the conclusion to be convenient and not really convincing. The violence at the end was slightly out of place with the rest of the investigation, but gripping none the less.

Certainly above average, but becoming a little familiar.

I will continue to eagerly anticipate Michael Connellys rich narrative works as Harry "walks down those mean streets" once more.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Bosch not at his best, 22 July 2013
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I always enjoy a Harry Bosch novel, but somehow the plot and characters felt a little tired. Maybe it is time Harry called it a day and spent more time with his daughter. It wasn't hard to guess the outcome (unlike in earlier books in this series) and the whole story felt tame after reading the latest John Sandford book.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Connelly, like Bosch, is a shadow of his former self, 19 Dec. 2012
By 
OEJ - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Black Box (Hardcover)
Detective Harry Bosch gets involved in another cold case, that of the unsolved murder of a female Danish journalist twenty years earlier, at the time of the Los Angeles riots. While he painstakingly gathers evidence and develops hunches, he is once again faced with an internal affairs examination. What very few sub-plots there are involve his 16-year-old daughter Madeleine and his slow-burn romance with Hannah Stone.

I have read every single novel by Michael Connelly, and while this is professionally and smoothly delivered, sadly there's not that much substance to it. For several years Connelly depended almost exclusively on Bosch to pay the bills, and in the early days he consistently produced some very satisfying stories. The Black Box is, I think, the first Bosch outing I've not been able to give either 4 or 5 stars, so this is a little sad for me. Every year I look forward to the latest Connelly effort (whether it's Bosch, Haller or a standalone) but this was a 'quality disappointment'. The writing is good from the first page, but it takes a long time before it really gets going - beyond 300 of the 400-odd pages, anyway.

There's nothing new about Bosch investigating an Open Unsolved case, but there were two things missing this time around. First, it was curiously difficult to care (in the same way that Bosch does) for a successful pursuit of justice. Possibly one of the reasons for this is that the suspects are not actually introduced in person - as part of the narrative - until late on, so for a large part of the tale they are no more than names. Difficult to engage with or have any feeling about. The second thing that was missing compared to earlier Bosch escapades was a sense of tension or danger - and when it eventually did turn up, not only was it (again) very late in the story but it was over almost as soon as it started.

Bosch's love-life is getting more and more insignificant these days, and while he may be rather unconcerned about that, it used to make for better reading when he was. Past relationships with the likes of Rachel Smalling and Eleanor Wish had real impact, but his latest companion Hannah Stone doesn't offer very much and at times it almost feels as if he's having dinner with his sister rather than someone he might have real passion for. In some ways his daughter has taken over his private life, but once again, compared to past episodes, not a lot happens in that department. There's another Internal Affairs probe (although it has a new title these days) but it always feels half-hearted and bolted on for no worthwhile reason.

Anyone completely new to Connelly or his pride and joy Bosch will probably wonder what all the fuss is about, why Connelly is one of the most successful crime fiction writers in the world. This won't get many newcomers putting his next novel on their wish-list or rifling through the Bosch back-catalogue. As for established Connelly fans, I think they'd have to be crazy to think that The Black Box is as good as his older stuff. Most of the basics are still there, it's just so diluted compared to Bosch at his best. Also, after a massive 'middle bit', the ending is much too fast and feels rushed. The story could have been improved with a much better thought-out ending, and I would have given it another 100 pages - but they weren't there.

For some reason I kept thinking of one of my favourite Bosch tales Lost Light, which didn't have the most dynamic of storylines but was in my opinion possibly the most memorable of them all because it really got into the mind and heart of Harry Bosch in ways that the author has rarely managed to equal since. The Black Box is quite good and I did enjoy it - just - but it doesn't come up to this author's previous high standards.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars very poor, 11 Dec. 2013
This review is from: The Black Box (Paperback)
i love Michael Connolly books, however this is the worst book he has produced. Given that Connolly himself says that the LA riots and his background as a journalist make this a special book to him, its a shock that this is so bad. I had high hopes given the potential the background to the story hints at at the start but it soon went off to the familiar fight against the department.

Its not in the Lost Symbol league of dross but then what is!
Harry has become a cruel stereotype, the sort of cop that a Touch of Cloth uses so well. Hes a maverick that bends the rules and goes against his boss, hes in trouble and goes it alone, hes etc etc etc.
Either retire him or give him his mojo back.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A well crafted entertaining page turner, 26 Nov. 2014
By 
Robin Webster "Robin" (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
‘The Black Box’ is yet another novel in the series about Harry Bosch: for those not familiar with him, he is a hard noised, aging, cold case detective working for the LAPD. The book opens in 1992 and the backdrop is the LA riots, after Rodney King was beaten up by police officers. During the course of the riots, Harry finds the body of a white Danish journalist who had been shot dead. Due to the riots his unit is overwhelmed with work and he only has a short time to examine the crime scene before moving on to the next incident. However, he did recover the bullet and shot off his last two Polaroid rolls of film which detailed the body’s position at the time of death. The case was then handed over to another unit and remained unsolved and was almost forgotten. Twenty years later it was one of a number of cases that was re-opened and because of Harry’s history with it he volunteered to take it on. There then follows a well-crafted entertaining page-turning book as Harry Bosch attempts to find the journalist’s killers and build a case with only the flimsiest of leads which are outlined above. But build a case he does and my admiration goes out to the author Michael Connelly for the way that he manages it. He also leads us to an original unexpected ending. I find it impossible to say more about the story-line without giving too much away. So all I’ll say about the book is if you are looking for a fast moving well-paced easy to read American crime novel that is obviously well researched, this is your book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Better than ever!, 3 Jan. 2014
By 
Marleen (Dilbeek, Belgium) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Black Box (Paperback)
So happy to be back immersed in another enthralling Harry Bosch story! I wished the book didn’t end, or that there were even more Bosch books out there. Now that I’ve read them all, I feel bereft. I guess I’ll soon start reading them all over again.
There’s a unique quality to Michael Connelly’s writing; even more so by creating a character like Harry Bosch, the author has succeeded into bringing to life a totally incomparable and compelling character. Harry's intelligence, his tenacity and determination to fight for the victims is unparalleled. I wish more writers had Connelly’s talent. I am looking to find other authors who provide such an amazing protagonist, but I haven’t really found it.
In the Black Box we find Harry is still working in the open/unsolved unit and he decides to re-open the "Snow White" case. When he was an officer during the 1992 LA riots he came upon a murdered Danish reporter Anneke Jespersen, who was found dead by a National Guardsman. Harry was never able to solve that mystery and it basically went dormant for 20 years. The fact that he never found Jespersen's killer had always gnawed at him and the 20th anniversary sets him to dive back into it.
In the meantime he has annoyed his new group leader (O'Toole; nicknamed the Tool) and pretty soon the PSB (formally Internal Affairs) is investigating Harry for improprieties when he visited his current girlfriend's (Hannah) son in prison. Harry is no longer a regular detective as he is in his four year DROP period and he could be let go for the merest infraction.
For Harry, the search for clues is painstakingly slow. His best bet is “to follow the gun” and when that leads him, bit by bit, step by step, to a very specific group of 5 men (no spoilers!), he decides to work the case solo and drives up north to Modesto while taking a few days of vacation.

What more can I say - This was a superb read. Harry Bosch is better than ever.
I'm also glad about the evolution his personal life is taking. His relationship with Maddie rings very true. They have ups and downs, for sure; probably because they are so much alike. And as all single fathers, Harry makes mistakes. On a side note, it looks like his relationship with Hannah won't last, and I, for one, I'm glad for that; I always thought Hannah wasn't the right partner for Harry.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Harry's changing, 30 Aug. 2013
This review is from: The Black Box (Paperback)
Harry Bosch, Michael Connelly's fictional hero, is celebrating 20 years in the crime-solving business, and The Black Box was promoted well in advance as a novel that would celebrate the life and work of this unconventional character.

The story takes the reader back and forth in time as Harry, who now works in the open-unsolved unit of the LAPD, decides to investigate a cold case, the murder of a young white woman during the Rodney King Riots of 1992. The woman, who was given the nickname Snow White by the press, was shot and killed, almost execution-style, in a somewhat quiet and deserted area of the city. At the time of the murder no witnesses came forth and apart from a bullet, nothing else was found at the scene.

Normally nobody would pay too much attention to the incident, since at the time chaos and mayhem prevailed in the city, but when somebody opened fire against Harry and his partner Jerry Edgar, while they were inspecting the scene, things changed; but yet things remained the same, since there was not enough evidence to carry on with the investigation.

Now, 20 years later, Harry is still haunted by the case and he's determined more than ever to discover the truth. However, the higher-ups in the chain of command are not so pleased with his decision for political reasons; the victim was white. So they try to stop him. And they fail. When it comes to the politicians, in his precinct, or elsewhere, he couldn't care less. What he cares about is the victims, and his personal need to give the relatives, whoever they may be, some kind of closure. So he battles on, though most of the time he's all alone, and little by little he starts to unravel the threads of the mystery.

At the same time he tries to spend as much time as he possibly can with his daughter Maddie, who also wants to be a cop and his girlfriend Hannah Stone, a therapist who has a son in jail, but of course that's not quite easy, since his job is his obsession, it's what he lives for, and it's what more often than not puts him into trouble. Thus it comes as no surprise that he's yet again investigated by the Internal Affairs.

Harry Bosch is maybe older now and a little bit wiser, but he hasn't changed. He's as stubborn, restless and uncompromising as ever. He may have mellowed somehow because of Maddie and Hannah, but that's about it. As they say, you can't teach an old dog new tricks.

The Black Box is not one of the best Bosch novels. The plot is good and the story runs smoothly, but not always, since every now and then it seems to lose its pace. I think that if it was a little bit shorter it would be much better. It is an enjoyable read though.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Still Captivating, 6 July 2013
This review is from: The Black Box (Paperback)
Book 18, in the Harry Bosch series

After 18 novels over a 20 years span one would think Mr. Connelly would ran out of ideas for this series, but it seems this challenge is a no-brainer for a prolific author. "The Black Box" it is both a story of police procedural and one that continues the saga of the protagonist personal life. Harry has aged well through times, now in his 60s he has been working cold cases for years and has become a man sworn to speak for the dead.

This latest opens with a chilling portrait of the war zone that L.A.'s South Central neighborhood became during the riots in the spring of 1992. When the body of Anneke Jespersen, a Danish journalist, is found in an alley, shot to death, Harry investigates, but amid the turmoil the case is not solved.

Fast-forward to 2012, the 20th anniversary of the riots is coming up and there will be a great media attention to unsolved murders. Marty Maycock, the current chief of police assigns Harry to the daunting challenge of closing the Jespersen case.

Of course there are few pieces to go by and Harry never failing zeal and his strong sense of guilt for not having solved the case in the first place provides the spark to get him started. He retrieves the archived boxes of Anneke's belongings and the investigative file. There's not much to go on, but some tantalizing leads develop before the nitwit lieutenant in charge of the cold-case unit tells him to drop it and w ork another case. It doesn't take long before the tenacious detective finds himself caught in a maelstrom of departmental politics and personal danger as he searches for the "black box" (piece of evidence, fact, etc.) But Harry never fails to amaze us and will eventually discover the truth.....

Mr. Connelly excelled as always in building added tension into virtually all of Harry's decisions. He also pays attention to police procedural details while giving his protagonists lots of leeway. There are moments in the novel when the action goes into high gear and Harry transforms himself into a warrior, even in his 60s he still kick butts...all this for our enjoyment, of course I could not stop turning the pages to see what came next. The dialogue and narration are quite lively and fast moving exactly what we expect from the author. The result is a complex tapestry of plots, deftly crafted suspense and well-rounded characters.

Even after all this time Mr. Connelly still manages to keep me a loyal fan...
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3.0 out of 5 stars A good story but badly researched, 16 April 2013
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This review is from: The Black Box (Paperback)
As an avid Micheal Connelly reader I was looking madly forward to this but as a Dane I was mightily disappointed.

It's a well oiled story with a good premise and plot. Bosch is still a fascinating character after so many years and his way to go about solving the crime is still just as riveting a journey as it was 20 years ago.

Usually, Connelly's books feel extremely quite realistic, firmly planted in the communities in which it takes place. I often see the street of Los Angeles clearly in my mind when reading his books. They appear well researched. i guess largely due to Connelly writing about places he has been to, loved and hated for years. The Black Box unfortunately has an aspect in it that Connelly is not so well versed in. It completely falls through because of the Danish angle. Connelly does acknowledge having had help from Danish mystery writer Sara Blædel on the Danish passages and I can find no fault there.

The problem is that when the Danish characters communicate in English, it falls completely flat and paints a miserable picture. I do realize that for most readers this will not matter as they will not pick up on the problem but for a Dane reading this, and perhaps even other Scandinavians, it is quite troubling and at least for me shattering to the reading pleasure that the English used by the Danes is so shoddy. It does not represent the most likely level of understanding of the English language that by far most Danes, particularly of the described background, would display. Even if their skills were poor, the types of mistakes displayed are very unlikely as they do not match up with any of the common mistakes Danes do display in English. The biggest blunder is that a former editor of a major newspaper apparently does not speak English! I actually do not think any Danish editor of a major newspaper for the past many decades would have had the job if he did not speak English. Danes are generally quite proficient in English. Virtually all Danes speak English. It is compulsory in school from the age of nine/ten and it used to be from the age of 11/12.

For me, it has been a frustrating and honestly prolonged read. I am sure that for most these issues will not matter but it is a to me surprisingly flawed book.
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The Black Box
The Black Box by Michael Connelly (Hardcover - 22 Nov. 2012)
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